Who here DOESN'T own a .22lr?


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Cryogaijin
May 21, 2011, 05:55 AM
It seems to me that a .22lr is the most common, most versatile, most useful firearms training tool out there. For the cost of 20 rounds of many other calibers, you can have 500 rounds of .22. And the rifles are inexpensive, often VERY much so for their quality.

Every firearms owner I know has one. I'm curious who doesn't have one.

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Ohio Gun Guy
May 21, 2011, 06:43 AM
^just one.....;)

RugerBob
May 21, 2011, 06:50 AM
I bought a 22lr semi auto handgun a few weeks back. Its the 1st 22 I have ever owned. The only reason I got it was ammo costs.

Charleo0192
May 21, 2011, 08:52 AM
I have only one .22 myself. Great for the range as the ammo is so cheap. Also comes in hand when you have someone with you who doesn't care much for recoil.

Carl Levitian
May 21, 2011, 09:20 AM
About half the guns I've ever owned at any one time in my life have been .22's.

When I was a teenage without a lot of money, I shot a lot of .22's just because I could do a lot of practice cheap.

When I was a young man and the better half and I were raising a family of three children, I shot a lot of .22's because they were cheap.

When all my kids got to shooting age, they got a new .22 rifle, and the family shot a lot of .22's for practice, because they were cheap to shoot.

When my son went through police academy, he was the best shot in his class because of the heavy practice growing up.

When my daughter became a state parole agent, she was top shot in her group, I'd like to think because of all the junior league practice growing.

Now that my wife and I are both social security retirees, we still shoot a lot of .22's because we like to go to the range twice a week in nice weather, and a bulk box of .22's won't kill the social security check.

Yeah, we do a lot of .22's. Always have, always will. I see way too many of these young guys who go out and buy a center fire pistol as their first gun, and never get to be a really good shot. I can only guess that they lack a father or uncle, or grandfather who would have taken them out as a kid, with a brick of .22's and an afternoon to kill learning the holy trinity of sight picture, breath control, and trigger squeeze. No range session is complete without a .22.

Carl.

CZguy
May 21, 2011, 10:05 AM
Carl Levitian nailed it. .22s have been my lifelong favorite.

4D5
May 21, 2011, 10:22 AM
There's quite a few in the safe.

Couple 10-22s with several upgrades
S&W 15-22 < way fun to shoot
S&W Model 41
S&W Model 17
Several Rugers in various configurations
Several Buckmarks in various configurations
High Standards
And then there are the suppressors to go on quite a few:cool:

They all compete for space with all the other friends in the safe.

InkEd
May 21, 2011, 10:30 AM
I think it is one of those sooner or later type things. That is to say it is inevitable, if given enough time. Pretty much any serious gun owner will at one point have at least one. It's like if you own a muscle car, sooner or later, you will "have to" see how fast it can go. How you test it may vary (race track, on the street, dyna machine, etc) andthe same with a .22lr (semi-auto, revolver, long gun, etc) BUT no matter HOW you do it, you WILL do it.

Kliegl
May 21, 2011, 11:19 AM
I respect my muscle cars too much to see how fast they can go. They are 40 years old, after all. 100 is fast enough.

22s are extremely useful.

Ryanxia
May 21, 2011, 12:36 PM
Technically I do not own a .22 atm. I used to have 3, I sold 2 and gave 1 to my grandfather. That being said, the one I gave him I cleaned for him a year ago and it's still sitting in my gun safe. A nice Ruger 10/22 is somewhere on my list of next purchases :)

The 2 I sold were; Marlin 22 bolt action rifle & NAA PUG .22 Magnum. Didn't care for either.

jahwarrior
May 21, 2011, 12:56 PM
i don't. i've only ever shot handguns or rifles chambered for .22 a handful of times. looks like i'm gonna have to finally break down and get my daughter that pink Cricket she's been bugging me for.

Doxiedad
May 21, 2011, 01:17 PM
I don't own a .22 LR yet.

9MMare
May 21, 2011, 01:33 PM
I dont have one.

They're fun to shoot but I see no purpose for one (for me). I'd like to spend my $ on more practical firearms, as my only interest is self-defense (and my 2 .45 SAs for mounted shooting).

I spend my time practicing with my 9mm SD weapon & ammo.

Wish list: smaller, thinner carry weapon and a decent car handgun, both likely 9mm. Maybe a shotgun for home defense.

The only reason I'd get one would be for hunting small game should the SHTF...and my pursestrings dont extend that far right now.

glock36
May 21, 2011, 01:47 PM
I don't have one as of yet, but am looking at 3 for my boys

ShroomFish
May 21, 2011, 02:34 PM
I love my .22's and I will never not own one :P

3 marlin 60's
1 winchester single shot passed down from my great granddad
1 (or 2) random single shot rifles from from granddad and great granddad
1 random .22 mag lever action
3 .22 revolvers
And i few more I cant think of....

texgunner
May 21, 2011, 02:44 PM
I have two rifles and five handguns in that caliber. It's a useful little round.

oldfool
May 21, 2011, 02:50 PM
four Browning 22 rimfire rifles
two Ruger 22 rimfire pistolas and one S&W and one AutoMag
one Hi-Std and one Taurus and five S&W rimfire revolvers
one Hi-std 22 rimfire derringer
one Marlin and one Savage rimfire rifles
two "little people" rimfire rifles (Chipmunk & Crickett, one black, one pink)

I guess I don't "qualify" :)

Walkalong
May 21, 2011, 09:53 PM
Two rifles. Two pistols. Want more.

JCallaway82
May 21, 2011, 09:56 PM
I've got a cheap Marlin Model 60 SB stainless just for random plinkin' and I let my fiance shoot it a lot when we go to the range because she doesn't like the kick of the other guns so much. lol


Other than that, it basically sits there. But I guess it is mandatory to have.

Aren't we all
May 21, 2011, 11:18 PM
I've totally worn out a .22 Henry Pump:what:

And I do not know anyone who does not have a .22 something..

Mikenmel08
May 21, 2011, 11:36 PM
A decked out 10/22
And a GSG-5 SD MP5 Clone that is a blast to shoot.

CraigC
May 21, 2011, 11:38 PM
I have an even two dozen and typically don't take folks very seriously when they speak negatively about the lowly .22LR. With rare exception, if you don't have at least a couple, odds are you're probably not a serious shooter.

ol' scratch
May 21, 2011, 11:55 PM
I own three. :neener:

Marlin 795
Kimber Model 82 Government
Ruger Mark III Target

9MMare
May 22, 2011, 12:12 AM
I have an even two dozen and typically don't take folks very seriously when they speak negatively about the lowly .22LR. With rare exception, if you don't have at least a couple, odds are you're probably not a serious shooter.

Interesting point of view. If one is interested in self-defense (not gun collecting, not 'fun' shooting, not 'plinking')....why would that make someone not 'a serious shooter?' Probably?

Is there something about the .22's **stopping power** that I've missed? Because outside of my competing in mounted shooting...THAT is all I really ask of a gun...stopping an attack and reliably going bang every time.

I'm not offended, because I'm not real concerned about .22s, but if you have more to support the effectiveness of .22s *for my needs*, I'm interested in hearing it.

toivo
May 22, 2011, 12:24 AM
OK, I have a disease... My last inventory of .22 rimfires shows 17 rifles and 6 handguns. Some of them I shoot all the time, and others go in and out of the rotation, but I do shoot them all.

I shoot rimfire more than anything else, about evenly split between rifle and handgun. Next comes shotgun, then centerfire handgun, and last is centerfire rifle.

mljdeckard
May 22, 2011, 12:26 AM
I didn't for a long time, but I do now. A conversion kit for my 1911, my dad's old 10/22, and my old F.I.E. nylon 66 knockoff O got when I was a kid, my dad handed back to me.

CraigC
May 22, 2011, 12:52 AM
If one is interested in self-defense (not gun collecting, not 'fun' shooting, not 'plinking')....why would that make someone not 'a serious shooter?
Not necessarily. Bottom line is that it is a physical and economic impossibility for most shooters to practice as much with a centerfire as you can with a rimfire. I burn through 2000-3000rds a month in .22LR. Even with my cheapest .38Spl handloads, it would be over $400 a month in ammo. Versus around $100 for .22LR. Trigger time = skill and trigger time is cheaper and easier with a .22LR.

Yours is a question of intent. If all you're doing is making noise, then no, it's not very productive. Fun but not productive. If you take your rimfire shooting as serious practice, then there is no better tool for building shooting skill and that equals proficiency a centerfire-only shooter can only dream of.

9MMare
May 22, 2011, 01:07 AM
Not necessarily. Bottom line is that it is a physical and economic impossibility for most shooters to practice as much with a centerfire as you can with a rimfire. I burn through 2000-3000rds a month in .22LR. Even with my cheapest .38Spl handloads, it would be over $400 a month in ammo. Versus around $100 for .22LR. Trigger time = skill and trigger time is cheaper and easier with a .22LR.

Yours is a question of intent. If all you're doing is making noise, then no, it's not very productive. Fun but not productive. If you take your rimfire shooting as serious practice, then there is no better tool for building shooting skill and that equals proficiency a centerfire-only shooter can only dream of.

This was a total consideration for me. $ vs practice. That is one reason I went with 9mm. Of the calibers that 'most experts' consider for self-defense, it was the cheapest (as someone else said, you never see police depts carrying .22).

It made little sense for me to practice with a lower caliber and less kick than I would need in a RL situation. So I do my practicing with 9mm. It certainly provides a closer experience to RL since that is what I carry.

Are you saying that people cant achieve the same proficiency practicing with other calibers? (probably not) Or just that they can practice more, cost-wise, with .22?

I agree, it would have been fun to practice with .22. I shot a friend's sometimes and it was fun....if anything, too easy! But it didnt replicate the same experience as my carry 9mm, so I think that time spend practicing with my carry gun was/is better spent.

BTW Craig, the guys at the range watched me as I came along with my shooting and after awhile, suggested that I join the IDPA group for practice. They said that at SD distances, I had good proficiency and was just wasting ammo after a certain point ( I would keep shooting until I my arms/hands tired and then could develop bad habits) Not to stop doing that, but to expand my experience.

CraigC
May 22, 2011, 01:19 AM
If you practice with a .22LR of the same platform as your carry gun, yes, it does translate. Recoil is but one of many factors present in shooting. The fundamentals are the same and the fundamentals are the most important. There's nothing you can't do, do it better and more often with a proper .22LR. I can easily attribute 90% of my centerfire shooting skill to lessons learned with a rimfire. Ten years ago I shot two deer in such quick succession that my hunting partners thought it was somebody else with an automatic. It was me with a .30WCF levergun. I didn't learn my proficiency by shooting thousands and thousands of centerfire rounds. I learned it with .22's. The only reason I'm able to hit small objects at 50yds with a 1911 is practice with a .22 conversion. The only reason I'm able to fire five rounds through a single action revolver, reload and fire five more in 18seconds is rimfire practice. The only reason I'm able to hit a Coke can from contact distance to 15yds, point-shooting with a Colt SAA is rimfire practice.

Unfortunately, yours is an all-too-common misconception. Properly applied, rimfire practice will make you a better shooter. No matter what.

9MMare
May 22, 2011, 01:32 AM
Unfortunately, yours is an all-too-common misconception. Properly applied, rimfire practice will make you a better shooter. No matter what.

You may be right then. Altho I'm not sure why. I'm not sure why the same number of rounds shot with 9mm (or .40 or .38 or .45) would be less worthwhile than .22. But there may be something.

I'm not knocking .22 (except IMO it is not a useful SD round), just that for me, it seemed to make more sense to spend my $$ and practice time on my carry gun.

Would I like to have the time and gun and $$ to plink with a .22? Sure. It's very fun. But I dont. My time is measured and as such, is spent on my carry weapon. I'm open to your claim that practicing with a .22 is more beneficial, but I'd need to see some concrete data on that.

ol' scratch
May 22, 2011, 08:36 AM
I don't think it is the time, but the expense. I can't reload for what it costs me to shoot .22. I still do reload and shoot lots of centerfire. I got back into .22 after developing a very nasty flinch from shooting my 'big' gun. The only thing I have been able to do to correct it is hours spent popping off .22. It is liberating not concerning myself with picking up brass either.

As far as a SD round, a lot has to do with shot placement. Are there better options? There sure are, however; a well placed .22 shot is better than a miss with a .45.

BIGGBAY90
May 22, 2011, 08:40 AM
Never had as of yet

The Lone Haranguer
May 22, 2011, 08:54 AM
My .22s had to be - reluctantly - sold to pay for trivial things like rent and car payments, so I don't have any at this time. But I would never consciously choose to not have one (or several).

ATBackPackin
May 22, 2011, 09:02 AM
Right now I have a Ruger Single Six and a Marlin 981. Very soon I am going to trade-in/sell so I can get a Ruger Mark III 22/45. I'm going to do the same thing with the rifle as well, but not sure what I am going to get. Any suggestions??? I do not want a bolt action and I'm not a fan of the Ruger 10/22.

Shawn

del4
May 22, 2011, 09:27 AM
9mmare, if you can afford to shoot until you're tired with 9mm then a .22 is a moot point for you. If you are "the man with one gun" or one caliber, that's great. I shared your same thought process in the past. But most of us can't or don't want to spend that much on shooting. Plus, .22's are a lot of fun and they are practical to a large degree.

22-rimfire
May 22, 2011, 10:33 AM
I'm not knocking .22 (except IMO it is not a useful SD round), just that for me, it seemed to make more sense to spend my $$ and practice time on my carry gun.

Yeah, tell this woman that a 22LR does not make a reasonable caliber for a self defense tool. http://peachtreecorners.patch.com/articles/police-release-911-tape-reporting-duluth-shooting-6?icid=main%7Chtmlws-sb-n%7Cdl1%7Csec3_lnk1%7C213916

So you shoot a gun at the exclusion of others that in all likelihood you will never use for self defense. Makes perfect sense to me.

Shooting 22's will make you a better shooter.

I own more 22's than any other caliber and more than all the others lumped together. No point in listing 22's as nobody would be interested in reading the list. I don't qualify for this thread.

Onward Allusion
May 22, 2011, 10:44 AM
In my experience, a lot of people who are not shooting sports enthusiasts do not have more than 1 or 2 guns and they're usually not in .22LR. I know more than a few that has a handgun or shotgun for home protection and shoot it once a year, if even that. Usually it's a 9mm or 12 shotgun.

BTW, yes I have 22LR and it was my 2nd caliber. The first being a .25ACP 'cause I bought the thing for protection (when I was a total newbie 25 years ago).

9MMare
May 22, 2011, 12:37 PM
Yeah, tell this woman that a 22LR does not make a reasonable caliber for a self defense tool. http://peachtreecorners.patch.com/articles/police-release-911-tape-reporting-duluth-shooting-6?icid=main%7Chtmlws-sb-n%7Cdl1%7Csec3_lnk1%7C213916

So you shoot a gun at the exclusion of others that in all likelihood you will never use for self defense. Makes perfect sense to me.

Shooting 22's will make you a better shooter.

I own more 22's than any other caliber and more than all the others lumped together. No point in listing 22's as nobody would be interested in reading the list. I don't qualify for this thread.

At least Craig was constructive and offered information.

You just sound offended that I dont 'like' your preferred caliber.

I barely even understood what you wrote...are you saying that I shouldnt practice with my gun because in all likelihood I'll never really need it in self defense? Cuz that's about the silliest thing I've ever read here and alot of other people here are wasting ammo too.

I dont shoot for fun...I realize that is not the common view around here. The enjoyment I get from shooting is a by product of my desire to be proficient with my chosen self defense weapon. I find standing on the firing line boring after awhile....but I certainly enjoy the challenge of IDPA practice. It is great training and fun.

And the .22s lack of stopping power is a BIG reason that I do not consider it a reasonable SD round. Sorry if that bothers you.

spelsh
May 22, 2011, 12:41 PM
Not yet :(

But I'm saving the cash up for one!

9MMare
May 22, 2011, 12:51 PM
9mmare, if you can afford to shoot until you're tired with 9mm then a .22 is a moot point for you. If you are "the man with one gun" or one caliber, that's great. I shared your same thought process in the past. But most of us can't or don't want to spend that much on shooting. Plus, .22's are a lot of fun and they are practical to a large degree.

I'm a woman :) Hence the 'mare'.

And going to the range once a week, spending $25 on ammo didnt seem all that much. (That was 2 boxes of 50 when I had to hunt for $12/box). Now it's easier to find cheaper 9mm again.

Cheaper than most of my other hobbies, that's for sure!

smallbore
May 22, 2011, 12:53 PM
Two rifles & two pistols.

E304life
May 22, 2011, 12:53 PM
Some how I do not own a .22 yet. Surely my next firearm will be a .22lr Sig p22x. I've discovered how fun pistols are and now i NEED a .22 to become proficient without going broke.

del4
May 22, 2011, 01:09 PM
Sorry, I thought it was like 9mm nightmare. : )

valnar
May 22, 2011, 01:21 PM
I don't own one. My weakest round is .38sp.

Mike J
May 22, 2011, 01:41 PM
I don't have anything really special just a couple of Marlin model 60's & a Heritage single action revolver. As others have said .22's can be a lot of fun & the price is right.

I believe shooting just about anything can improve us as shooters. I haven't done it lately but there for a while I was spending 10-15 minutes a night in the yard with a cheap Daisy CO2 pistol. When I went back and shot my centerfire pistols my groups had shrank considerably.

Prion
May 22, 2011, 01:44 PM
I don't, I prefer centerfire because I like the BOOM!

22-rimfire
May 22, 2011, 02:25 PM
You just sound offended that I dont 'like' your preferred caliber.

And the .22s lack of stopping power is a BIG reason that I do not consider it a reasonable SD round. Sorry if that bothers you.

Doesn't bother or offend me in the least.

I barely even understood what you wrote...are you saying that I shouldnt practice with my gun because in all likelihood I'll never really need it in self defense? Cuz that's about the silliest thing I've ever read here and alot of other people here are wasting ammo too.

It is not silly at all. I don't spend my life and my resources preparing for something that will likely never happen. Practice is good with your 9mm. Never hinted that it was not. But there are a lot of people wasting ammo in pursuit of reaching some skill plateau of self defense skill that simply is not necessary unless it's fun, you live in a place that you believe requires you to take measures for your self defense, or you regularly come in contact with people that are potential threats to your person. As a woman, you have a different perspective than I do about potential threats.

You will improve as a shooter overall shooting 22LR handguns and rifles if it is fun for you. If it is not done for recreation, then I would stick to the 9mm. Everything doesn't have to be done in preparation of some low probability event.

If money is an issue, you can retain or develop most of the skill you have developed with the 9mm shooting a 22. It does not seem to be an issue for you. So, it is all a mute point. No argument here. Keep shooting.

Statements or opinions offered on THR are not necessarily directed to every member who might be a gun nut. There is another potential audience where a common sense approach has validity.

Added later: 9MMare, you're pretty perceptive. I actually stated that at one point in my post (about the amount of practice) and then deleted it out to simplify my message to you and others. We all need practice. The lowly 22LR is quite a useful caliber and should never be discounted as insignificant or impotent. I don't carry a 22 by the way.

The-Reaver
May 22, 2011, 02:38 PM
I have one pistol and three rifle's one pending sale right now.
I love .22's they are the most fun out of anything I own.

oldfool
May 22, 2011, 02:47 PM
9mmare
"If one is interested in self-defense (not gun collecting, not 'fun' shooting, not 'plinking')....why would that make someone not 'a serious shooter?' Probably?"
"all I really ask of a gun...stopping an attack and reliably going bang every time."

If you have the wherewithal and willingness to send 15,000 or more rounds downrange annually with your choice of centerfire, then you probably have no real "need"

but... it could still be an asset to you
those who say you should practice with your self defense rounds are right
but those who say you should practice ONLY with your self-defense rounds are missing part of the picture

you cannot correct technique problems you do not recognize
there are thjngs that can be better seen and recognized shooting 'recoilless' rimfire that may not be recognized if shooting only hefty centerfire rounds, and neither intuition nor pride is a substitute for that
you cannot blame misses with 22 rimfire on anything but yourself, not if you know what your guns "can do"

some say using high X rifle scopes is just a crutch
I say it's a great tool for teaching you what you are not doing consistently enough, not an exclusive tool, but a useful tool
I say the same about rimfire practice with "same frame" or "conversion kits" in handguns
try that, and if you do not hit same/same with both rimfire or magnum centerfire (or 9mm), ask yourself why

your "need", maybe not
but some of us do benefit from it
collecting is good, plinking is fun, but "serious shooting" never was about caliber only

shoot well, be well, and always mind your backdrop

PS
no deliberate offense intended, ma'm
but you do seem to be saying "I do not do that, therefore I know"
and telling others here that do do that, that they don't know
you could, of course, be right

Sebastian the Ibis
May 22, 2011, 05:00 PM
I don't own a .22 anything and never have, even though I have shot a lot of .22's

I grew up in the city so real firearms were out. I pretty much learned to shoot accurately with a crossman, and then an RWS airrifle in the basement and the backyard.

Now that I'm grown up, I still live in a city (Miami) and there is no where to plink, which is what .22's are great for. I get to the range about once or twice a month, when I do I want to practice with my SD pistols, or my HD long guns 7.62x39 or .223. I'm sure shooting .22 rifles would help my accuracy cheaply, but I just don't see a great need in light of the foregoing.

effengee
May 22, 2011, 07:06 PM
I know alot of people who don't own a .22 lr but we have one for each of the kids and one each for me and the Mrs. and the old pistol we got as a housewarming gift.

3 Marlins (2 semi, 1 bolt)
2 Mossbergs (1 semi, 1 bolt)
1 Ranger (bolt)
1 Stevens (semi)
1 Remington (bolt)

1 Charter (SA/DA)

ErikO
May 22, 2011, 10:54 PM
None as of yet but Walther P22 and Bersa T22 will be inbound shortly. :)

carbuncle
May 23, 2011, 12:23 AM
I have never owned a .22, but .22s occupy 2 of the top 3 spots on my list of future acquisitions and one of them will be my next firearm purchase.

jbkebert
May 23, 2011, 12:35 AM
We have at least a dozen and will probably buy more.

fbernar
May 23, 2011, 12:54 AM
I don't have one, but tomorrow that will most likely change. I came across a Marlin 60 w/ a Nikon Prostaff 3-9x40 scope at the store and I think I might buy it. Hear that they are excellent for dove season!

JohnBiltz
May 23, 2011, 01:00 AM
Guess I'm not a serious shooter. I've owned a couple in the past and thought about a 10/22 pretty seriously not too long ago but I don't own one now and really don't miss one.

Busyhands94
May 23, 2011, 01:04 AM
my mother would not let me get a "real" gun, but i do have an NAA companion (.22 LR equivalent) and an NAA super companion (.22 Magnum equivalent) i don't know if it counts because it's a cap and ball but i don't have a gun that will fir .22 LR cased ammo.

doc2rn
May 23, 2011, 01:28 AM
My first was a Ruger Standard, did double duty as HD weapon in my dad's sock drawer. He went in halves with me on my 11th birthday. I took him to the range a couple of years ago, now my 1950s colt sits in his sock drawer, and I feel much better about that. ;)

shiftyer1
May 23, 2011, 02:06 AM
I have several, I didn't know it was possible not to own a .22.

Johannes_Paulsen
May 23, 2011, 02:41 AM
I don't, although my father did, and I used to use it for target shooting back in the day. I might get a Walther P22 one of these years as a plinker, but there are a lot of other things I want to buy (firearms and non-firearms related) before I'll devote the money to that....

Erik M
May 23, 2011, 07:23 AM
Marlin Model 60 was my first gun, first thing I did was buy the ATI Dragnov stock for it. I lost the front sight and havent been able to shoot it in years. I think brownells or numrichs sells them. someday i will get around to it. Until then I will keep plinking with my Heritage rough rider .22/.22mag

CHEVELLE427
May 23, 2011, 07:40 AM
1/3 of my collection is 22's.

fun to shoot
cheep to shoot
anyone can handle the noise and recoil
shtf a 22 might be the number 1 gun to have for survival , (food getter, zombie wounder)
one could carry a pocket of 22 lr all day long and not run out of ammo

i see a lot of talk about the Walter p22 had 1 for 1 day at the range it sucked for accuracy, i was told they were out fast , i guess after shooting any target 22 pistol anything less is just a plinker anyway.

for the money i would look for a HS SK100 OR A BROWNING NOMAD you wont believe how accurate they are, i have 1 of each and just bought another nomad that should be here next week. mags are high but accuracy is outstanding, i also have a decked out ruger mkII bull barrel target that cant hold a candle to the plan Jain 60's guns.

Screendmon
May 23, 2011, 07:56 AM
I dont have one, right now.

pockets
May 23, 2011, 07:57 AM
Nope, I don't own 'A' .22lr ............
A quick inventory check and (among all of the others) it appears that I own 29 handguns and 17 rifles chambered for .22LR .
Of my most recent pistol purchases in the past couple of months, 3 out of 5 have been .22's (the other two were .380acp and 9x19mm). Been a big fan of .22LR for many decades.
.

merlinfire
May 23, 2011, 09:32 AM
My first gun that I ever had I bought for myself when I was 22. It was a 22, a 10/22. Every time I think of selling it, I say to myself: "How can I not have a .22 rifle in my collection of arms?" And so I don't.

ForumSurfer
May 23, 2011, 10:07 AM
I like to shoot. I like to shoot a whole bunch of rounds. I like to shoot a whole bunch of rounds real often. My kids like to shoot now. They like to shoot all dang day on Saturdays. 22's let me do just that.

My eldest just shot his first centerfire pistol Saturday. I loaded him up with 1 round mags just to be safe, then slowly upped the round count. 15 yards, first 10 rounds were all with in a 6" shoot-n-c target. I've seen grown men at the public range who can't duplicate my pre-teen's efforts (factor in the fact that a glock isn't exactly built for a pre-teen's hand and his feat becomes all the more impressive!). I'm %110 positive that this has to do with being well prepared and already having lots of trigger time to get his grip, trigger pull and technique well established prior to ever shooting centerfire. I think 22's make great practice for any level shooter. If you can afford to have yourself and your family send at least 2000+ (since we shoot outdoors, that number doubles during the summer)rounds a month downrange with another caliber, that is great for you. I can't.

Anything that turns a day of shooting into a family outing is more than worthwhile in my book.

husbandofaromanian
May 23, 2011, 10:18 AM
My hobby is shooting 22lr at long distance (300yards). My firearm is a TC Contender(G2) pistol (with Bullberry 10.5" barrel) and a Tac-65 silencer. Sitting on top is a Super Sniper 16x. This is plinking to the extreme. It is a lot of fun.

For carry defense I carry a p3at. For car defense I carry a Judge. BUT THE 22LR IS THE FUN GUN. The centerfire guys had better have their firearm tuned in and practiced up if they want to take on my 22lr. I can group 1.5moa at 300 yards on a regular basis (windless conditions).

AZ Hawkeye
May 23, 2011, 04:38 PM
I don't own one.

USAF_Vet
May 23, 2011, 04:43 PM
The first gun I bought for myself was my 12gauge. The second gun I bought for myself was my .22LR.

It's great for plinking, teaching the kids shooting fundamentals, squirrel hunting, etc. I don't see any need for a .22 hand gun, but I'll probably pick up a .22 revolver at some point for S&G.

smalls
May 23, 2011, 09:26 PM
I unfortunately don't. I used to shoot my dad's growing up, though. I think I might pick one up after I buy my 1911.

xfyrfiter
May 23, 2011, 10:29 PM
2- 10/22 rifles, 1 single shot that has been in the family more than 60 years, 1 bolt action tube mag, 1- 22/410 over under. Kinda like potato chips, no one can own just one.

Isaac-1
May 24, 2011, 02:53 AM
First off yes I have .22's and am shopping for another one now, I am looking for a full size frame .22 handgun or maybe some model with a .22 conversion kit.

I grew up in the country, and as a teenager would carry a gun when going out into the woods or fields around the house (you never know when you might need to defend yourself from a wild animal, coyote, pack of wild dogs, hogs, etc. ), that gun was almost always a slide action .22.

GrimCPT
May 24, 2011, 09:52 AM
i don't currently have a 22lr. . . or any rimfires for that matter.

ForumSurfer
May 24, 2011, 10:24 AM
One thing that prevents many people from enjoying a 22 is lack of appropriate shooting environments.

Reactive targets like spinners, plates, paintballs, evil soup cans or what have you are what make shooting 22's FUN.

Every once in a blue moon I will visit a local indoor range instead of shooting outside on my property. Shooting alone gives me a chance to prepare for many things, except distraction. Occasional I'll visit the range just to shoot with other shooters. In that environment, I discovered that punching holes in a static piece of paper while standing in a designated spot where double taps or rapid fire are banned...well, it gets really boring really fast with a 22.

Case in point: I have a good friend that thought shooting 22's just completely sucked. She was an indoor range shooter because that was all she had access to. I invited her out to my place to shoot a few times. I offered her my 22 revolver to shoot with, to which she replied that 22's were boring and she didn't understand what all the fuss was about. I gave her a box of cci and setup a few spinners, a race tree, some tin cans and a resetting 4 plate spinner target. As soon as one or two shots connected, she was grinning from ear to ear. Next time she came over, she brought a ton of 22 ammo. :)

Red Cent
May 24, 2011, 08:42 PM
9MMare, step outside the box. Between CraigC and Oldfool, your "argument" will not work.
If shooting a 22 will not make you a better shooter, then I suppose you are against dryfire practice.No recoil, no "feel of recoil".
This is another old shooter who has this to practice:
(22s)
http://i229.photobucket.com/albums/ee189/redcent69/Lever22s001.jpg

To be proficient with these:
http://i229.photobucket.com/albums/ee189/redcent69/Win1873comparison.jpg

And that is a 22 3rd from the top that gets me familiar with the aluminum framed 38s.
http://i229.photobucket.com/albums/ee189/redcent69/Handguns/rugers003-1.jpg

And I use this:

http://i229.photobucket.com/albums/ee189/redcent69/Handguns/MKIIIholster005.jpg

to train for this:

http://i229.photobucket.com/albums/ee189/redcent69/ColtNationalMatch.jpg

Since I have taken up PCCA with this (big hands-experimenting with grips):

http://i229.photobucket.com/albums/ee189/redcent69/Handguns/DanWesson010.jpg

and this:

http://i229.photobucket.com/albums/ee189/redcent69/Handguns/SmithWessonM60-10002.jpg

Guess what revolver caliber I am getting.

Red Cent
May 24, 2011, 08:49 PM
And CraigC. I'm fairly fast but I don't think I can do the point shooting thing.

sv51macross
May 24, 2011, 09:04 PM
I was working with a limited budget and had other priorities, so I bought an AK, first gun I owned and fired. It showed too when I finally got around to taking it to the range to sight it in.

But a .22 is on my short list, right after a pistol and my CPL. There are a ton of really cool .22s and options for those choices. I'd probably get a 10/22, as cliche a choice as that may be, since they're the Honda Civic of the .22lr world.

CZguy
May 24, 2011, 09:08 PM
I'd probably get a 10/22, as cliche a choice as that may be, since they're the Honda Civic of the .22lr world.

True enough, but don't forget the Marlin model 60, the Toyota Corolla of the .22LR world. :D

ForumSurfer
May 24, 2011, 10:16 PM
True enough, but don't forget the Marlin model 60, the Toyota Corolla of the .22LR world.

Haha! I think the marlin 60 is more like the kia, though. It just doesn't get much cheaper! Still, the marlin 60 is more accurate than most people who are shooting it. I have 2, and I can hang with my buddy's tricked out 10/22. :)

AethelstanAegen
May 24, 2011, 10:29 PM
I actually don't yet own a .22lr. I'm planning to correct that in the near future. My younger sister shot one this weekend and really liked it (a 10/22), so beyond just being a cheap practice gun, I think a .22lr will have her (and some of the other family members a bit shy of the greater kicking rifles) more interested in coming out to shoot with me. I'm thinking of getting something in a lever action as that fills a nice void in action-types so far in my collection.

bubbacrabb
May 24, 2011, 10:38 PM
I find the 22lr not only a cheap way to practice, which being a reloader and I cast bullets, i can make some cheap centerfire bullets. Its a great SHTF type weapon. If something happened and you had to take off with just what you have on you why not have a 22 pistol with you in your bag? What else can you carry 1000 rounds with and food and water? Not much. Im not saying dont have a centerfire weapon with you, but you cant beat the 22lr when space and weight are involved. Accurate, and good up to deer size game in my opinon. And Im not saying its optimum, but in a survival situation i'd take that shot.

CZguy
May 24, 2011, 10:49 PM
Accurate, and good up to deer size game in my opinon. And Im not saying its optimum, but in a survival situation i'd take that shot.


I always remember my Grandfather saying that during the depression more deer were killer by a .22 short than any other cartridge. Those old guys knew how to get up close and make a head shot. (quietly)

ArfinGreebly
May 25, 2011, 03:21 AM
I have some .22 LR pieces.

An assortment of rifles (including my first, a 10/22 40th anniversary carbine), and a few Ruger MkII pistols.

I was already aware that practice with .22 LR was a good and inexpensive way to keep the fundamentals anchored.

The essential manual of arms isn't really all that different between my service caliber pistols and the Rugers, but a number of you have pointed out that it's also good to have pattern copies of service pistols/revolvers in .22 LR, because the size, weight, balance, and manual of arms are not "similar," they are identitcal.

I have a Smith & Wesson 586-7 revolver in .38/.357, and I ran across their .22 LR version of that same frame (model 617) and wondered why you would do that, when you can make a .22 revolver or pistol that weighs less. You know, why make a heavy .22 clone of a .357 mag?

Ah, well, I get it now.

I can't afford to shoot the .357 enough to get truly proficient with it.

However, for the cost of shooting the 586 regularly for six months, I could buy its .22 clone, and shoot it regularly for the next six months. Seriously. If I shot a modest 100 rds of .38 FMJ weekly, that would be about $200 a month. In six months, that adds up to $1,200 which not only pays for the model 617, but enough .22 LR to shoot 200 rds a week for six months.

Now, if you're not going to actually shoot the thing, it's kinda pointless to blow more than $600 on a .22 LR revolver. If, on the other hand, you mean to practice until you're instinctive and intuitive about hitting any size target at any range, then it would be foolish to not get the .22 version. (Unless, of course, you have a sponsor and can afford to just shoot until you go blind at no cost to yourself.)

*Sigh*

I guess I need to start looking for some pairings for my service pistols in .22 LR.

Who wants to be my sponsor?

:D

CraigC
May 25, 2011, 11:28 AM
I have a Smith & Wesson 586-7 revolver in .38/.357, and I ran across their .22 LR version of that same frame (model 617)
Not technically. While visually similar, the 586 is an L-frame and the 617 is a K-frame. Noticeable difference in size and weight but the grip frames are the same. But an excellent point all the same.

RimfireChris
May 25, 2011, 12:55 PM
I have several. Used to have a Marlin 60 and 795, traded them for other purcases. I still have my 981TS, the wife's 60, the nephew's Mossberg 801 Plinkster half-pint, a P22 and a Taurus 990 Tracker, which is currently on "vacation" in Miami. :rolleyes: I love them because I can afford to shoot them alot. I have at least 5-10 more on my want list.

ny32182
May 25, 2011, 01:00 PM
A few months, or maybe a year ago I bought a CMMG .22 conversion kit for an AR15, just because I figured I should have something capable of shooting this cartridge, and in case I ever ran into any very timid new shooters. However I've only used it a couple times; maybe 300rnds total. All my other limited .22 shooting has been with other people's guns.

I'm a Master class IDPA shooter and consider myself to be fairly serious about that. If I thought a .22 would make me better, I would have one. However, .22 has not appealed to me as a training tool and here is why:

-Recoil is obviously well under that of competition loads (9mm minor PF in my case). A lot of IDPA skills revolve around stringing together very rapid shots, and in my opinion you want to get your rhythm going around the actual recoil impulse. Consistency is a key theme for me, and if I was shooting a bunch of different cartridges with different recoil characteristics, I believe it would throw me off. I proved this to myself in the other direction once: I figured my .40 Glock wasn't seeing enough action, so I took it out with major PF loads to shoot in a USPSA-like outlaw match one time (many of the same type skills excersized). It did not go well. The reason is that the extra recoil threw off my expected timing of the sights up/down cycle, trigger prep in that space; etc. It affected the accuracy of followup shots almost every time. .22 would have the same effect/opposite direction; I am sure.

-Secondary concern for me is the reloads; I seriously doubt that a magazine for a Glock conversion feels like, or even has the top shaped exactly like a magazine with 9mm loads in it.

-Therefore I would view .22 practice as much more similiar to dryfire practice than live fire, and I already do dryfire as often as I can, and I can do it at home. If I take the time to go to the range for live fire practice, that is what I want; real live fire and all the characteristics thereof.

If you "just" want to shoot more rounds for cheaper, obviously the .22 is great. However if you are practicing for a very narrow/specific purpose, with specific goals in mind, the question I would ask myself is, whatever I am doing, be it dry, with .22, or with centerfire, is it actually moving me toward that goal in a measureable fashion?

03Shadowbob
May 25, 2011, 01:45 PM
I have more 22s than all other guns combined. I was raised on 22s which is also why I feel like I am a better than average shot.
There is definitely something to be said, though, about not growing up in an area where you can just take the 22 out back or out in the woods and have a great time for almost no money. Growing up in South Florida, I remember being able to go just west of Military Trail and shooting anytime I wanted. Hell I used to ride my bike with my old Remington Targetmaster positioned across the handlebars and the cops could care less. Nowadays, you can forget about shooting outside here unless you use the sheriff's range once a month. Not too much fun to shoot 22s inside against paper. Just my opinion though.

FIVETWOSEVEN
May 25, 2011, 02:42 PM
I don't have my own .22 just yet, If I want to shoot .22 I just borrow one from someone.

Red Cent
May 25, 2011, 03:38 PM
The 22 helped me attain this. 'Course an hour of dryfiring every evening. Shooting competition every Saturday and Sunday for seven years. Winning local, state, and regional competition on the way. You and I know that shooting is somewhat like golf. Well, in May of 2007 I put the game of my life together.

http://i229.photobucket.com/albums/ee189/redcent69/ChampionshipBuckle002.jpg

I am more proud of the fact that out of a total of over 500 shooters, I came in 35th with a roster of the world's best.

What do you shoot in IDPA? Does the qualification of ES in PCCA help?

ny32182
May 25, 2011, 04:33 PM
Red Cent, very nice! I definitely have nothing that says "World" and "Champion" on it.

PCCA, I have seen Dean's announcements but am not familiar enough with it to know how it compares to IDPA. So far in 2011 I have been to three state/regional matches and managed a top 3 in SSP each time. Like many, I know I can get better, and just need to design and execute the path to get there! I did take these pics a few days ago for unrelated reasons.

Regarding Cowboy, I don't know too much about it, but one of the old IDPA MD's at my gun club is currently more into cowboy than anything else, and he was telling me a little about it and letting me shoot his guns on the practice range one time. They were really very light in terms of recoil, and if I'm not mistaken he was saying there is no PF requirement, so those loads were perfectly legal. If that is the case and .22s really can handle very much like competition loads, I'd probably be all over them for practice too.

monet61
May 25, 2011, 10:04 PM
Between rifles and handguns, I own 9.
10-22
(2) Marlins
MK nothing Ruger .22 semi auto
(2) Double nines
no name .22 revolver
Mossberg Plinkster
Japanese single shot .22 short

I love .22's. Taught my daughters on them. Now I'm teaching their kids on them. Great family fun.

09prknotts
May 25, 2011, 10:09 PM
Don't own one at the moment, Ive owned 2 in the past and just sold one a few months ago to fund another gun purchase. I do plan on buying another .22lr in the near future.

JTHunter
May 25, 2011, 10:23 PM
Two .22 LR's have gotten away from me: a Marlin 39A levergun and a Ruger SA (one of the old round barrel pistols).
I've kinda made up for it though. :D
Ruger 10/22 Carbine,
Marlin 881 bolt,
a Ruger Convertible revolver (.22LR/.22 Mag),
and a Marlin 983 bolt in .22 Mag.

I will eventually inherit a Marlin "Glenfield" (?) .22 LR SA w/ tube mag.

Red Cent
May 26, 2011, 10:28 AM
ny32182, which club and what is the MD's alias.

http://pocketcarrycomp.com/aboutus.aspx

shiftyer1
June 9, 2011, 02:25 AM
My mom grew up shooting .22 every sunday. The kids weren't allowed inside on sunday. Shooting at tin cans, light bulbs etc. She shoots 1 or 2 rounds every 15 years or so of various calibers. Mostly when some guy starts talking foolish while we're all around shooting. One year it was a 12ga with a slug and another it was an sks.

All that .22 practice must have done something, she don't miss. I left her an old 12 ga. for home defense but she's starting to show a little interest in handguns.

03Shadowbob
June 9, 2011, 07:49 AM
Here's the newest one. A beatiful Marlin 60 topped with a Centerpoint scope. Great setup for under $200.
http://i150.photobucket.com/albums/s113/BJCWALL/guns/1895NagantMarlin60001.jpg

LibShooter
June 9, 2011, 08:20 AM
I'd probably get a 10/22, as cliche a choice as that may be, since they're the Honda Civic of the .22lr world.

A Honda Civic took me nearly 250,000 miles at nearly 40mpg. So that's good.

tcrace
June 9, 2011, 09:25 AM
Two Marlin bolt actions, one Henry, one 10/22, a 22/45, and Rough Rider. I like to shoot larger caliber rifles and handguns too but can't imagine life without a 22 and I've had quite a few of both over the years. If you don't own a 22 rifle, pistol, or revolver don't walk, RUN to your LGS and purchase one ASAP. Just kidding of course, if you have no desire to own a 22 that's ok because that leaves more for those of us that do :)

sfrank711
June 9, 2011, 09:42 AM
I don't and haven't ever owned one. I'm relatively new to the sport/hobby/lifestyle and given the fact that my financial resources aren't unlimited, I took care of my more pressing needs first. Meaning, a 12 GA short barreled shotgun for HD and an M&P .40 for carry and personal protection. Definitely plan on taking that step eventually but undecided at the moment whether it will be my next one. I tend to approach new purchases methodically while addressing as many needs/wants as possible with one transaction. Which in turn, leads to some compromises but hopefully being completely satisfied with the purchase I've made and not feeling led to make another one. And so, my issue is should I go with a cheap, fun, easy to shoot .22 or opt for a centerfire rifle with more range, more adaptability (hunting, longer range target shooting, etc)? I'm hesitant to buy a .22, even as affordable as they are, with the suspicion that I will soon want to buy a heavier, more powerful rifle. Anyone have any thoughts?

CajunBass
June 9, 2011, 10:03 AM
I don't have "A" 22.

I've got several of them.

03Shadowbob
June 9, 2011, 12:06 PM
sfrank,
It's my belief that everyone needs a 22 rifle and a pistol and no "collection" is complete without them. I do believe that 22s are a great entry rifle and at $100 used, hardly a bad investment or bad decision. Shooting rifles is different than pistols and a 22 is good cheap entry level learning. Depending on whether you want a bolt action rifle or a semi auto you can reasonably get both a 22 and a larger bore rifle that have very similar platforms.
Regardless, it is your wallet and do what you feel is best.

Cryogaijin
June 9, 2011, 12:49 PM
It's my belief that everyone needs a 22 rifle and a pistol and no "collection" is complete without them. I do believe that 22s are a great entry rifle and at $100 used, hardly a bad investment or bad decision. Shooting rifles is different than pistols and a 22 is good cheap entry level learning. Depending on whether you want a bolt action rifle or a semi auto you can reasonably get both a 22 and a larger bore rifle that have very similar platforms. Pretty much this exactly. It always strikes me as a bit odd when I talk to someone who doesn't have a .22. Thus this thread. A .22 is a prefect teaching tool with which to work out your form and biases. And it is unlikely to contribute to poor form by teaching a flinch.

IMO everyone needs at least one.

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