Lee .356 sizing die


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Sapper771
May 21, 2011, 08:56 PM
I just started casting my own boolits (frustrated, but loving it!). I am using a Lee 6 cavity 125gr .356 9mm mold. I am casting air cooled wheel weight alloy. They are casting out of the mold at .358-.359. They are weighing in at 126gr-127gr . My Lee .356 bullet sizing die is sizing them down to .355. Is this normal? I have taken sample measurements and they are all the same. I am measuring with a Frankfort Arsenal dial caliper ( which may not be accurate).

While we are on the subject, I have been seeing a lot of conflicting info while doing my research on casting with wheel weight alloy, specifically air cooled vs. Water quenched.
I have read that air cooled wheel weight alloy is good up to 1000 FPS. Another source states that air cooled is good up to 1200 FPS. Yet another source states that it is good up to 1400 FPS as long as the right lube is used (I am currently using Lee Liquid Alox). I am looking to load cast, air cooled, wheel weight alloy bullets at a standard velocity (1050-1100 FPS ? ) . These rounds will be fired through a Lone Wolf barrel in my G17. I am looking at W231 and WSF as far as powder goes ( heard that WSF is excellent for this application). I guess I am just looking for a little clarification.

Any advice or info would be greatly appreciated.

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Walkalong
May 21, 2011, 10:37 PM
The size needs to match the barrels size. I would think .355 would be borderline problematic, depending on pressure.

Slug the bore and you will know what to size them to.

Air cooled wheel weight bullets should shoot fine at any sane 9MM/125 Gr velocity with no leading, assuming they fit the bore.

Sky King
May 21, 2011, 11:13 PM
Using your dial caliper measure a know jacketed bullet to see if your caliper is indeed accurate. Then you'll know if your .356 sizing die is .355 or .356. I slugged my 9mm using egg shaped fishing sinkers in a well oil barrel. With that I size my cast bullets at to .357.
Because I have found out that after a couple of months of sitting on the shelf they shrink .001, and even if they don't I would rather have them .001 larger to prevent leading due to gas cutting the lead from an under sized bullet.

eam3clm@att.net
May 22, 2011, 12:49 AM
The TL design and 9mm will give you a hard time adding to the problem you are learning as you are going. First slug your bore and see what size it is. This will tell you what diameter to start with +.oo1 is a good start but I have a 9mm that shoots good with .358 bullets. Some of my lee sizers do size small and they can be opened out a little. I will also suggest you check out the cast boolits fourm as there is a good thread about TL boolits

Sapper771
May 22, 2011, 08:20 AM
Thank you all for your help.

I slugged the barrel. Groove diameter of my Lone Wolf barrel is .355".

Also checked my caliper on a few Hornady 124gr XTP bullets......yeah, its the caliper. That means my sizer is sizing the bullets correctly and I need to get a better caliper.

Thanks again.

bds
May 22, 2011, 01:26 PM
Yes, LW barrels are consistent at .355"

I am using a Lee 6 cavity 125gr .356 9mm ... These rounds will be fired through a Lone Wolf barrel in my G17. I am looking at W231 and WSF as far as powder goes (heard that WSF is excellent for this application). I guess I am just looking for a little clarification.
I have used both W231 and WSF with good results. I am using G22 with LW 40-9 conversion barrel.

Hodgdon's data (http://data.hodgdon.com/cartridge_load.asp):
124 gr LEAD RN WSF .355" 1.169" Start 4.0 gr (945 fps) 22,200 PSI - Max 4.7 gr (1055 fps) 27,300 PSI

125 gr LCN W231 .356" 1.125" Start 3.9 gr (1009 fps) 25,700 CUP - Max 4.4 gr (1086 fps) 31,200 CUP

Sapper771
May 22, 2011, 02:17 PM
bds,

Thank you for the load data. Its about to be put to use.

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