Most American service gun!


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Lone wanderer
May 26, 2011, 12:00 AM
ok, so i got 2 thinking what is the most American Service gun. one that represents America, it's citizens, and what we stand for. feel free to tell me which gun i left out of the poll, no doubt i'll forget one :P

Contenders are:
Colt 1911
M-16
M-14
M-4
Springfield 1903
Henry Repeater
Sharps Rifle
Krag rifle
M1 carbine
M1 Garand

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mdThanatos
May 26, 2011, 12:02 AM
Think you are missing the M1 Garand.

There are too many to really consider though.

M16 standard issue for the longest period of time.

Winchester 66, 73, Colt Peacemaker, guns that won the west.

M1 Garand, very distinct, easily recognizable and will eat your thumb when you don't respect it.

Calhoun
May 26, 2011, 12:04 AM
Um, all of them. It's in the Constitution.

rellascout
May 26, 2011, 12:06 AM
Colt 1911

http://i56.tinypic.com/29c8g1e.jpg

Ole Humpback
May 26, 2011, 12:08 AM
Model 1897 Winchester Shotgun, 1863 Springfield rifle, 1873 Springfield Trapdoor, Browning Automatic Rifle, 1873 Colt Single Action Army, 1862 LeMat Revolver

kozak6
May 26, 2011, 12:11 AM
The Krag was designed by Norwegians, and the Springfield '03 is almost a Mauser.

Colt SAA
Kentucky Rifle

LibShooter
May 26, 2011, 12:14 AM
It's gotta be the Garand.

MikeNice
May 26, 2011, 12:20 AM
Colt SAA
Colt Model 1911
M1 Garand
M 16
Lever Action Rifles

mgmorden
May 26, 2011, 12:25 AM
Gotta be the Colt 1911.

The Garand - lauded as it was - was only in service for 21 years. The Colt 1911 was standard issue for 74 years and still serves in very limited issue situations in active duty. That aside, look at the civilian market today: the Garand is a very nice collectors item. They're expensive though, and there is virtually no interest in a reproduction version by the general public.

On the other hand, 1911's still sell in droves, and some version of it is made by at least half of the major arms manufacturers. Don't get me wrong - I would really love to have a Garand if I could, but all in all as far as in person I've only ever even SEEN maybe 15 to 20 real Garands. I couldn't even begin to count how many 1911's I've seen.

The M16/M4/AR15 platform (they're all pretty close - really variants of the same gun rather than separate ones) is a close second, but I think the 1911 platform is it beat both in service life and civilian ownership.

Murphy4570
May 26, 2011, 12:27 AM
The Garand was invented by a Canadian, remember.

I'd have to say the weapons that America used to become a nation. Captured English muskets, "Brown Bess"es, etc.

HK Jake
May 26, 2011, 12:27 AM
Colt 1911

http://i56.tinypic.com/29c8g1e.jpg

Yes! +1

Lone wanderer
May 26, 2011, 12:27 AM
Cant believe I forgot the Garand. that was the reason i was posting this :P

ColtPythonElite
May 26, 2011, 12:32 AM
Colt SAA

Heretic
May 26, 2011, 12:59 AM
Damn, that was a tough choice. However, my personal opinion has to be the 1911.

gathert
May 26, 2011, 01:08 AM
Owning a 1911 made in 1918, and an M1, my vote goes for those. Had to pick the 1911 though. Shoots like a bear, but it super accurate and tons of fun to shoot.

Nushif
May 26, 2011, 01:34 AM
Thus far I'm the only one who voted M14 ... here's my reasons why:

The M14 just blatantly seems like a brainchild of the US. It has a very classical stock with this "marksman concept" in mind and while being modifiable it is still truly a product of necessity, rather than some deliberate planning. IT feels like the step between a high volume low caliber PDF style weapon and this truly american concept of a "battle rifle" (read, big, accurate, grossly oversized in every aspect and for some reason more fitting for the last war.)
In short, it keeps the hallmarks the US military prides itself in, while showing the ingenuity of our military as a whole, or rather our lack of predictable planning, which in a twist of irony makes us exceedingly annoying to fight.

Apocalypse-Now
May 26, 2011, 01:38 AM
ok......

Ramone
May 26, 2011, 01:43 AM
Gotta be the Colt 1911.

The Garand - lauded as it was - was only in service for 21 years. The Colt 1911 was standard issue for 74 years and still serves in very limited issue situations in active duty. That aside, look at the civilian market today: the Garand is a very nice collectors item. They're expensive though, and there is virtually no interest in a reproduction version by the general public.

On the other hand, 1911's still sell in droves, and some version of it is made by at least half of the major arms manufacturers. Don't get me wrong - I would really love to have a Garand if I could, but all in all as far as in person I've only ever even SEEN maybe 15 to 20 real Garands. I couldn't even begin to count how many 1911's I've seen.

The M16/M4/AR15 platform (they're all pretty close - really variants of the same gun rather than separate ones) is a close second, but I think the 1911 platform is it beat both in service life and civilian ownership.

I would have said the same thing, almost word for word.

The M1Garand is a fine weapon, but even in WWII, the first ones issued to Marines in the Pacific were rejected- the Marines liked their tried and true 1903A1.

It continued to serve through Korea, and was still in use as a Sniper's Rifle in Vietnam.

My uncle, now in his 80s, was one of those Marines that turned down the new M1Garand on Tarawa, and still Has a CMP 1903A3(s). He can still out shoot me with it, most days.

IMO, the 1903Springfield, and the 1911 are the American firearms that made the last century. The M16 (AR15/M4/whatever) is the one that brought us into the 21st Century, and after 48 years (first issued in 1963) it is a classic in it's own right.

Maverick223
May 26, 2011, 01:50 AM
I voted Winchester, specifically one of several lever rifles (but mainly the '73, '92, '94, and '95)...a classic of the old West that is still used today. The M-70, albeit a outstanding rifle, is based upon the Mauser, so not a contender for the "most American" firearm. The same can be said for the M-1903 Springfield. The M1 Garand is a close runner up IMO.

:)

Arkansas Paul
May 26, 2011, 02:01 AM
Colt SAA.

amprecon
May 26, 2011, 03:28 AM
Dude, where's my Tommy Gun? :confused:

The quintessential firearm that the world recognizes, aside from the ol' Colt SAA and Colt 1911.

CharlesT
May 26, 2011, 04:23 AM
Glock 19

*snickers*

Apocalypse-Now
May 26, 2011, 04:35 AM
i don't see Jennings or Lorcin on that list! :eek:

MachIVshooter
May 26, 2011, 04:37 AM
I'm gonna have to say, as important as they are, the Garand and the M1903 are less qualified than the rest. The Garand was designed by a Canadian, the M1903 by a German.

The Norwegian Krag really shouldn't even be on the list. Not only was it designed across the pond, but also built there. About as American as a Renault.

kozak6
May 26, 2011, 05:02 AM
John Garand became an American citizen in 1920.

Winchester 94 is another good choice.

Ole Coot
May 26, 2011, 09:42 AM
Tough choice and I have to pick three and being from KY the Kentucky rifle, all those westerns in the '50 bring in the Colt SAA, but for more men who served or not the 1911. Three different yet recognized by most as American. I didn't include a service rifle, the jury is still out on this one.

rellascout
May 26, 2011, 09:56 AM
Dude, where's my Tommy Gun?

The quintessential firearm that the world recognizes, aside from the ol' Colt SAA and Colt 1911.

+1 on how we could have over looked this one.

USAF_Vet
May 26, 2011, 10:12 AM
Of the guns on the list, I'd go with the M-16 family. I'm a younger guy, veteran of the ongoing conflict, and that is what I trained with. Not new by any standard, coming up on 50 years of service, but tried and true, fairly reliable and it doesn't seem to be going away any time soon.

2nd place on the list would be the 1911. Seems to be the one design most often copied, but purely American. I would have rather carried a 1911 over the Berreta M9.

+1 for the Thompson. Quintessential firearm of the prohibition era, used by G-men and Gangster alike, continued on to dominate the battlefields of WWII.

But the M-16 has my vote. M-4 just being a variant of the M-16 doesn't need to be on the list, imo.

LHRGunslinger
May 26, 2011, 10:13 AM
The M1903 was a near direct copy of the Mauser 98

GrimCPT
May 26, 2011, 10:15 AM
1911 for sure

CajunBass
May 26, 2011, 10:19 AM
Kentucky/Pennsylvania Long Rifle.

Carl N. Brown
May 26, 2011, 10:21 AM
For 2011, everyone will have 1911 in the back of their mind.

But, when Englishman Bram Stoker armed his protagonists to storm Dracula's castle in his 1897 novel, he had them choose Winchesters. Can't get much more American than Winchester rifle.

USAF_Vet
May 26, 2011, 10:23 AM
The M1903 was a near direct copy of the Mauser 98

I read something that asserted the Germans actually sued us for design or patent infringement because the Springfield 1903 was a near copy of the Mauser K98.

But, since the Germans were defeated in WWI, we pretty much told 'em to stuff it.

gdcpony
May 26, 2011, 10:30 AM
1911.
The Springfield shouldn't even be on the list. It is such a copy of a Mauser they paid for the rights!

Tokarevsrule
May 26, 2011, 10:33 AM
Mosin Nagant! We won the cold war so now we shoot their guns and ammo:D!
My other votes are 1911 and Garand

stevereno1
May 26, 2011, 10:38 AM
I think if you asked our enemies, they'd say the M16/M4. I voted M16

Loosedhorse
May 26, 2011, 10:45 AM
As has been pointed out already, ask any civilian outside the US what an American gun is, and they will tell you:

http://images.picturescraze.com/picture/3/t/thompson_submachine_gun-6344.jpg

Followed closely by the Winchester 94, and the Colt SAA. Those in military circles will probably point to the M4/M16.

jiminhobesound
May 26, 2011, 11:44 AM
The M1 Garand is the icon for the highest point of guts and the US culture and what we are supposed to be.

wlewisiii
May 26, 2011, 11:59 AM
The Garand liberated Europe. 'nuff said.

Vern Humphrey
May 26, 2011, 12:21 PM
There are just too many American arms of special note and history:

The Pennsylvania (Kentucky) Rifle.

The Rifle Musket (invented in America.)

The Colt Revolver

The M1 Garand

All these would qualify.

Black Butte
May 26, 2011, 12:24 PM
Colt 1873 peacemaker because it is associated with the western frontier, which of itself, is uniquely American. More so than the M1 Garand, anyway, because John Garand was originally a Canadian.

Vyacheslav
May 26, 2011, 12:37 PM
is there one that weighs about 500 pounds and cant be moved from in front of the television?

mgmorden
May 26, 2011, 03:19 PM
But, when Englishman Bram Stoker armed his protagonists to storm Dracula's castle in his 1897 novel, he had them choose Winchesters. Can't get much more American than Winchester rifle.

Yes but IIRC Quincy was the only American in the entire novel. Hard to say that a British guy arming mostly British characters with a certain weapon makes it more American ;).

SlamFire1
May 26, 2011, 03:25 PM
Lever actions are a America only invention. Russia bought some Winchesters M1895's and that is about the only use by a European power that I can think of.

The Browning Auto 5 was an America first invention. Pump shotguns are characteristic of Americans.

mgmorden
May 26, 2011, 03:31 PM
Russia bought some Winchesters M1895's and that is about the only use by a European power that I can think of.

Pst. Russia's in Asia ;).

Just One Shot
May 26, 2011, 03:34 PM
It has to be the 1911 hands down. There's probably more 1911s in homes across America than any 2 of the others on your list and that number increases practically every day.

Maverick223
May 26, 2011, 03:35 PM
is there one that weighs about 500 pounds and cant be moved from in front of the television?Yeah, not funny. :fire:

Is there one that comes to the aid of USSR/Russia, most of Europe, and a good part of the East when most of the civilized world is about to fall to the Axis powers...yeah, yeah there is...the Garand (and during WW-I, the M-1903).

Ole Humpback
May 26, 2011, 03:45 PM
is there one that weighs about 500 pounds and cant be moved from in front of the television?

This gun weighs 100 tons and is by far the most powerful non-nuclear weapon on Earth: the Mark VII 50 Calibre 16" Rifle. But, its attached to this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9pDXk7oblfk&feature=related

By the way, heres a little large bore awesomeness from the first Gulf War:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9HzVBVIjM6s&feature=related

And Pac-Ex 1989, Operation Sea Wolf IIRC:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qVyYmQkARl8&NR=1

mgregg85
May 26, 2011, 03:45 PM
I'd leave off the 1903, wasn't it mostly a copy of the mauser?

farson135
May 26, 2011, 03:51 PM
mgmorden- Russia is in both Asia and Europe, i.e. Eurasia.

OT- The M1911 got my vote but if I could choose three the others would be the SAA and the Kentucky Rifle.

19-3Ben
May 26, 2011, 03:52 PM
Maverick, lighten up. He meant it as a joke.

I voted Winchester. Sure, the 1911 is a very popular pistol even 100 years after it's introduction, BUT Winchester, Henry and Marlin lever guns were already top sellers 40 years before the 1911 was introduced!

THE classic American hunting rifle is the 30-30 levergun. The classic old west rifle was that very same gun (or a different chambering of similar gun).
Everyone owns one, or has a father/grandpa/uncle/etc... who owns one.
Even the antis have never ever gone after leverguns.

While I can appreciate the arguments for the 1911 or the SAA, I can't see a handgun being the "most American gun".

We're a nation of riflemen!!!!

AZ
May 26, 2011, 03:54 PM
I voted for the SAA. Had it been on the list the Kentucky Rifle would've been my choice, the revolution and the wild west, that's what foreigners associate America with.

JohnBT
May 26, 2011, 03:59 PM
I vote for the Saturday Night Special. A common gun for the common man.

Maverick223
May 26, 2011, 04:07 PM
Maverick, lighten up. He meant it as a joke.In which case a smiley (or most anything else to signify a joke) would have went a long way.

While I can appreciate the arguments for the 1911 or the SAA, I can't see a handgun being the "most American gun".

We're a nation of riflemen!!!!+1; "You cannot invade the mainland United States. There would be a rifle behind every blade of grass" (whether or not Fmr. Japanese Admiral Yamamoto actually said this is immaterial).

:)

Cosmoline
May 26, 2011, 04:15 PM
Can't get much more American than Winchester rifle.

But this is about issued military service firearms. So leverguns are not on the list. I think the military should have gone with a Savage levergun instead of the Krag or the Springfield, but they didn't

Likewise, while flintlock long rifles became a symbol of American independence and served in the War of Independence and 1812, the Army was slow to adopt them as an official firearm. And what they ultimately came up with wasn't as good as what the civilian market was producing.

I think the 1911 is a good choice overall. It's big, throws a large slug and is a JMB design. But for contemporary America, nothing captures the good and bad of our military and foreign policy better than the AR 15 platform. Its reliance on high tech solutions, its adaptability to gadgets, its precision and its vulnerabilities all represent modern US military strength.

Maverick223
May 26, 2011, 04:22 PM
But this is about issued military service firearms. So leverguns are not on the list.Winchester M-1895:

http://homesteadfirearms.com/cart2/cartimages/product/399winbay.jpg

I'd say that it qualifies despite the limited service life, due to its connection with TR.

:)

19-3Ben
May 26, 2011, 04:28 PM
But this is about issued military service firearms. So leverguns are not on the list.

Per the OP:
the most American Service gun. one that represents America, it's citizens, and what we stand for.

There are plenty of guns that represent our military. But how many ALSO represent the citizens? The impact of the levergun on the every day civilian is a testament to is success as an "American" gun that has served admirably in both military and non-military circles for the last 150 years.

Edit to add:
Maverick- good catch there!

Cosmoline
May 26, 2011, 04:31 PM
Yeah but no levergun was a major US service rifle. It's purely a civilian firearm design, apart from a few uses in the CW and when the Turks and Russians were using them. The 1895 was an issued military arm in Imperial Russia and used in very limited numbers by the Rough Riders and maybe some others. But I'm not even sure those were musket style 1895's. IIRC they were civilian purchased 1895's.

The one in your photo is in 7.62x54R--hardly what one thinks of as an American icon

http://homesteadfirearms.com/appraisals/1895/1895variations.htm

Ole Humpback
May 26, 2011, 04:34 PM
Winchester M-1895

Russia bought something like 300000 of those rifles and had them chambered for 7.62x54R for use in WWI. Teddy outfitted the Rough Riders with 1895's in 30-40 Krag.

19-3Ben
May 26, 2011, 04:34 PM
Yeah I know. But don't you just WANT a levergun to win? I mean, c'mon. It's a levergun!!!!

rcmodel
May 26, 2011, 04:43 PM
More folks my age owned a Daisy BB gun then any of those other guns mentioned.
I'll vote for that!

rc

Maverick223
May 26, 2011, 04:51 PM
The one in your photo is in 7.62x54R--hardly what one thinks of as an American iconTrue, I believe that the officers in the Rough-Riders used the carbine version (and was definitely chambered for the .30-40Krag).

That said it's downright un-American to dislike the lever rifle...standard arm of the US and Jesus alike. :p

Gig 'em
May 26, 2011, 05:22 PM
Distinctly classic pure American would have to be the M1911, SAA, or Winchester. An argument can be made that the Winchesters did not have the longevity of service as the others, but they are still things of beauty. I'm going to call it a toss up between the legacies of the SAA and M1911. That being said the beautiful distillation of the genius of Sam Colt and John Browning in the iconic M1911 is still being copied to this day and will be for many for decades. Then there's the Thompson submachine gun... :D

M60
May 26, 2011, 05:51 PM
The Winchester lever action.
The Colt Single action.
The "Tommy gun".

Maverick223
May 26, 2011, 07:03 PM
That being said the beautiful distillation of the genius of Sam Colt and John Browning in the iconic M1911...Samuel Colt had nothing to do with the M-1911...he was long dead by the time JMB designed the pistol.

:)

easyg
May 26, 2011, 07:22 PM
I think if you asked our enemies, they'd say the M16/M4. I voted M16
Yep, the M16 is recognized as a US weapon all around the world by friends and foes alike.

It has a very distinctive appearance that is easily recognized.

Carter
May 26, 2011, 07:30 PM
I think that this question would depend highly on the generation that is answering it. I'm sure WWII Vets would be more likely to say the garand and modern day vets/soldiers would say the m-16.
To those that have fought us recently I'd say the m-16 does scream American.

However, a lot of those weapons have been used by various US allies so they are not totally uniquely American.

The 1911 though just screams 100% american to me. Its got the beloved .45 acp round and carried for decades. IDK if other countries used it or not, but its probably one of the most collectable/sought after and recognized handgun in the US.

kozak6
May 26, 2011, 07:39 PM
I like the M14. The story of its development and cartridge are are classic American stubbornness.

talldragon
May 26, 2011, 10:03 PM
Not a front line rifle, but definately a mass produced weapon and U.S. made.. :)
As far as handguns go, M1911A1; Hands Down :cool: :D
http://www.directcon.net/gmc248/first_iwo_jima_flag_raising.jpg


http://www.longhunt.com/schematics/popup_m1carbine.html

http://www.carbineclub.com/

kenhwind
May 26, 2011, 10:22 PM
There are several choices for sure, but IMO the "Thompson Submachine Gun" is truly the American gun. Notoriety from the 20s and 30s by being used by the gangsters and bootleggers, and used valiantly by LEO, and the Marines guarding the US Mail and in the banana wars, and of course used by all branches of our Military during WWII.

happygeek
May 26, 2011, 10:54 PM
Nobody has mentioned the M2? Designed by JMB, been in service since the 1920s, used in dozens of roles, and still going strong. It's pure awesome to shoot too.

Black Butte
May 26, 2011, 10:57 PM
How about the Tommy gun? Used by the mobsters during prohibition and during WWII.

FROGO207
May 26, 2011, 11:04 PM
WELL------You said most American service gun and of those on the list IMHO it would be the 1911 hands down. There are many other great firearms in use by the various branches of the service. Now for the civilian answer I would say Peacemaker hands down followed closely by a Winchester lever gun.

azmjs
May 27, 2011, 01:47 AM
The SAA is the most distinctively American firearm, the M1 Garand the most distinctively American service rifle.

Many countries use m-16 pattern rifles. There are many semi automatic pistols in the world that operate in a similar way. Single action cowboy style guns are iconically and uniquely American.

50 cal
May 27, 2011, 01:58 AM
+ 1 on the m2. I own one of these. I think the reason I bought it was because it was the most american gun I could think of. Its been around longer than any gun in american military history and is still serving today. The ma-deuce deserves 1st place in the most american gun. It is a testiment to the brilliance of John Moses Browning. Nobody could improve his design in over 90 years.

Heretic
May 27, 2011, 02:00 AM
For 2011, everyone will have 1911 in the back of their mind.

For 2011, I have a 1911 in the back of my pants.

Gig 'em
May 27, 2011, 02:20 AM
Thank you Maverick223. I realized my flub when I read back over it just now. Oops. What I should have said was design genius of John M Browning and manufacturing quality/genius of Colt Arms, Samuel Colt's descendants. Excellent pistol anyway you look at it though. :) Thanks.
-Gig 'em-

happygeek
May 27, 2011, 02:26 AM
+ 1 on the m2. I own one of these. I think the reason I bought it was because it was the most american gun I could think of. Its been around longer than any gun in american military history and is still serving today. The ma-deuce deserves 1st place in the most american gun. It is a testiment to the brilliance of John Moses Browning. Nobody could improve his design in over 90 years.


:what: How much did that cost? I looked them up on Google before and if I recall correctly the government pays around $15,000 for one. There couldn't have been all that many registered prior to 86. It takes one heck of a range to shoot one on too.

doc2rn
May 27, 2011, 02:39 AM
American 180! Nuff said.

Ignition Override
May 27, 2011, 05:02 AM
The M-1 Garand.

makarovnik
May 27, 2011, 05:06 AM
Peacemaker. The gun that tamed the west.

kingcheese
May 27, 2011, 06:34 AM
Ma Duece, does that count?

if not, anything in 45acp is american, i personally like the M3 grease gun(think it was an m3)

achildofthesky
May 27, 2011, 06:47 AM
Why the CZ 527 American of course...

ol' scratch
May 27, 2011, 09:03 AM
As much as I love the Garand, I think the 1911 would be the choice. The reason is that John Garand was a Canadian.

RugerMcMarlin
May 27, 2011, 11:10 AM
I would like to suggest the original reach out and swat someone.

THE KENTUCKY LONG RIFLE

NMPOPS
May 27, 2011, 11:32 AM
The OP said American Service Firearm, so that rules out Winchester lever action . My vote goes to the 1911.

"Don't piss down my back and tell me it's rainin"

Vyacheslav
May 27, 2011, 01:44 PM
Yeah, not funny.

Is there one that comes to the aid of USSR/Russia, most of Europe, and a good part of the East when most of the civilized world is about to fall to the Axis powers...yeah, yeah there is...the Garand (and during WW-I, the M-1903).

oh, you mean one that can't get its nose out of everyone else's business and is part of the reason that kosovo is filled with parasitic bosnians, or one that couldn't even make it to berlin before the supposedly weak soviet army. they should make a gun like that, sell it at mcdonalds

summerhelp
May 27, 2011, 04:10 PM
or one that couldn't even make it to berlin before the supposedly weak soviet army

Why would we loose people to take Berlin when after the war Berlin is/was going to be in the Soviet occupied zone.

When I first read the title I though the OP was asking what the most American gun was and I voted for the SAA. After reading closer that it had to be a servie weapon my vote goes to eaither the M14 or the 1911. The M14 cause we ran with it when every other country in the world rejected it. The 1911 cause of how long it served and that its a .45 which is a truely american round.

amprecon
May 27, 2011, 04:15 PM
Actually, Northern troops purchased lever actions for use during the Civil War, maybe wasn't officially adopted by the gov't, but it was officially used.

Vern Humphrey
May 27, 2011, 04:27 PM
Actually, Northern troops purchased lever actions for use during the Civil War, maybe wasn't officially adopted by the gov't, but it was officially used.
The Union Army purchased about 110,000 lever action Spencers and used them extensively -- mostly for cavalry.

The Henry rifle was privately purchased -- some of Bank's men had them at Milroy.

68wj
May 27, 2011, 04:35 PM
I wish I could vote for 2 options, but I can't...
http://i63.photobucket.com/albums/h152/bryanseye/1911Anniversary.jpg

Maverick223
May 27, 2011, 04:39 PM
oh, you mean one that can't get its nose out of everyone else's businessAnd yet you poke your head in here with your vile slanderous comments and low road attitude. You have made your distaste for Americans and the United States as a whole clear...perhaps you should find some other place to spout your degenerate remarks.

Searcher4851
May 27, 2011, 05:20 PM
Rewckon I'm stuck between the 1911 and the SAA. Tough choice. So many good possibilities. Lever gun, tommygun, M-1, M-14, M-16. Only thing I don't recall seeing listed is the Sharp's.

Ryanxia
May 27, 2011, 07:07 PM
Colt SAA
Colt 1911

Gotta go with the 1911

22-rimfire
May 28, 2011, 08:23 AM
M1 Garand is in my opinion the most recognizable and significant US standard issue rifle in the last century. The 1911 is the most recognizable sidearm.

Sav .250
May 28, 2011, 08:36 AM
+1 on the winchester 94!

Heretic
May 29, 2011, 11:52 AM
So many awesome choices! I need some duct tape for my head!

Smaug
May 29, 2011, 06:33 PM
I voted single action army.

To my perception, I think it is the M16; that's what the rest of the world sees our troops carrying.

But to many other countries, we are associated with cowboys, because of Bush and our relatively liberal gun laws. So I voted SAA.

EddieNFL
May 29, 2011, 06:54 PM
1911...for the reasons mgmorden mentioned.

bannockburn
May 30, 2011, 10:15 AM
I would pick three from the list:

M1 Garand

M1911

M-16

bbuddtec
May 30, 2011, 10:36 AM
Another for Ma Deuce :)

sublimaze41
May 30, 2011, 12:04 PM
Love the Garand but the 1911 just smells American.

Gig 'em
May 30, 2011, 02:38 PM
Gotta love a Ma Deuce. She just makes me smile.

Vern Humphrey
May 30, 2011, 03:26 PM
Gotta love a Ma Deuce. She just makes me smile.
Me, too -- I commanded a Mechanized Rifle Company (A-1/61 IN) in Viet Nam. Getting into action with all those Ma Deuces is a blast!!

GCBurner
May 30, 2011, 04:35 PM
The Pennsylvania or Kentucky Long Rifle was the original All American gun, both in war and peace. That's why the Army uses it on the Combat Infantry badge.
http://www.americal.org/awards/cib.gif

Crash_Test_Dhimmi
May 30, 2011, 06:06 PM
The Makarov :p

JK

1911 All the way

50 cal
May 31, 2011, 12:58 AM
Shot my ma deuce today. Every time is like the first time. I found out what a troy built push mower engine looks like 30 feet in the air after an api round hits it. Lots of fun.

SharpsDressedMan
May 31, 2011, 09:52 PM
This one about sizes up the good old USA: The M2 Browning .50 BMG. Been in service longer than ANY US military weapon, and still going. It's tough, goes anywhere, and kickss ass, just like our country and our military. Beat that!

northark147
June 1, 2011, 10:46 AM
+1 for Ma-Duece... Its the biggest, Its the baddest

on the down side

Its known to get itself in a jam every now and then AND

is there one that weighs about 500 pounds and cant be moved from in front of the television?

I say it comes pretty close in some configurations.

Can it please get added to the poll so I can vote...

Stevie-Ray
June 1, 2011, 02:26 PM
1911 for sure. But as a close second, I'd have to go with Ma Deuce. I really want one badly.

Cosmoline
June 1, 2011, 03:51 PM
The Pennsylvania or Kentucky Long Rifle was the original All American gun, both in war and peace. That's why the Army uses it on the Combat Infantry badge.

Actually that is a Springfield Arsenal Musket M1795, and not a rifle at all.

http://www.army.mil/symbols/CombatBadges/infantry.html

But certainly if we're talking about non-issued firearms the long rifle is hugely significant. Technically though it's a hunting arm used in war, and not a service weapon per se. In some respects though what could be more American than having the most American service gun not be a service issued firearm at all, but one brought by men of peace to stop the Redcoats in the War of Independence and 1812? Is the idea of a military issued firearm even really American?

Ignition Override
June 1, 2011, 11:54 PM
At least one person here feels that the country which produced the M-1 Garand during WW2 (and many Mosin Nagants during WW1, under contract) might need a memory refresher.
This nation also lost many merchant seaman steaming around Murmansk- to German "U-boats"- while supplying shiploads of guns and some P-39 Aircobra aircraft etc to its besieged ally.

50 cal
June 2, 2011, 01:50 AM
As much as I love my ma deuce, I have to agree that the kentuckey long rifle is the most american service rifle, and will always be. On second thought, any weopon that was used in those days to win our freedom deserves credit. Swordes,knives,rocks,etc.

merlinfire
June 2, 2011, 08:50 AM
Its got to be the 1911, especially if you take into account length of service (its still in service in some units). No other long arm or handgun even comes close

Vern Humphrey
June 2, 2011, 12:33 PM
Another problem with the militia was lack of standardization. How can you resupply a regiment with ammunition when every man has a different caliber gun?

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