Holstering the Glock or XD with a round in the chamber


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Got_Lead?
May 28, 2011, 03:04 PM
When I carry my XD, I do carry it with a round in the pipe. However, I have to admit, that 5 pound trigger with no thumb safety makes me a little nervous, especially when holstering. I know there is the "New York" trigger spring for the Glocks, and XD's can be had with thumb safeties, but I'm kind of a purist, and like the pistol "as originaly designed". But it's kind of like having a 1911 cocked with the safety off, or carrying your revolver around with the hammer back. It does have my attention, always.

Is there anyone else that feels similarly?

I don't fault either of these fine pistols, but it just seems they could go bang pretty easy if the trigger ever got snagged up on anything.

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Strahley
May 28, 2011, 03:08 PM
Just pay attention to what you're doing while holstering. I have never once been worried about the gun going off while holstering

Think about it...the trigger guard will block anything in front of the gun on the way down. If something is sticking out to grab the trigger, it'll be blocked by that. If something is already inside of the trigger guard (i.e. a finger) then you weren't paying attention in the first place

basicblur
May 28, 2011, 03:32 PM
'Proper' way to holster an XD is to place your thumb on the rear of the slide-doing so removes the web of your hand from the grip safety.
Check out the last picture on the page here (http://corneredcat.com/Holster/belt.aspx).

Unlike the picture, I place the pad of my thumb on the rear of the slide-I find it:
1. Moves the web of my hand farther away from the grip safety (than the pictured method).
2. Provides more tactile feedback using the pad of my thumb.
3. Offers more strength to prevent in adverent movement of the slide.

'Course, it goes without saying? that your finger should be outside the trigger guard!

The Lone Haranguer
May 28, 2011, 03:43 PM
Use a rigidly constructed (leather or plastic is fine, just so it doesn't collapse) holster that covers the trigger. Be sure there are no intervening objects (shirt tails, drawstrings and such) between the gun and holster. If you feel any kind of hanging up or catching when reholstering, STOP! and find out why. And, most importantly, keep your finger off the trigger.

Mike J
May 28, 2011, 03:53 PM
I agree with basic blur-as long as you keep your hand off the grip safety it while holstering it should not be an issue. While I do not own a Glock I would think as long as you pay attention you should be fine. Like others have said use a good holster that covers the trigger guard.

Big_John1961
May 28, 2011, 03:59 PM
What is the point of a defensive handgun that you have rack the slide before it's ready to shoot? I want that sucker ready right now. No BG is going to wait for you to get ready. Be careful with your manual of arms and you'll be fine. These pistols were designed to be carried with a round chambered.

Gryffydd
May 28, 2011, 04:26 PM
I wouldn't even worry about this on the Glock as long as I was sticking it in a decent holster, but how on Earth could you worry about holstering an XD? I think the grip safety is mostly superfluous, but it definitely eliminates the discharge on holstering concern.

TonyT
May 28, 2011, 04:34 PM
I wouldnever use a gun for self defense which had an external hammer or any external safety. I see no problem with training oneself to keep ones finger off the trigger exept when firing and al;ways carry with a round in the chamber - it would be useless to carry a pistol without a round in the chamber.

jon86
May 28, 2011, 05:05 PM
If it makes you nervous, first take the holster off of your body/belt. Carefully insert gun into holster. THEN put holster on your body. A properly holstered firearm will never fire.

withdrawn34
May 28, 2011, 06:03 PM
The great thing about an XD is that it has a grip safety. Just keep your hand off the grip safety (putting your thumb on the back of the slide helps) and reholster.

Of course, that is not an excuse to forgo the normal rules of reholstering (making sure no objects, especially any shirt tails are in the area), but it does add an extra step of peace of mind. I really enjoy it. To be honest, I've really come to love the grip safety. I wish Glocks had one.

Also, keep in mind there is very rarely any need to reholster quickly. There is no rush. Take your time, and be safe.

HK Jake
May 28, 2011, 11:57 PM
Take your hand off the grip safety, and holster.

918v
May 29, 2011, 12:08 AM
Some people are better off carrying tazers.

jon_in_wv
May 29, 2011, 01:36 AM
I also do NOT like the idea of carrying a weapon like the Glock or my M&Ps in a holster that isn't rigid. I prefer kydex or a Crossbreed holster. I won' t carry it in an un-molded holster that would require "wiggling" the gun down into a collapsed holster or its mouth. I've used a Perters Custom Holster for my M&P for years now through thousands or holsterings and I have no fear its going to discharge when doing so.

leadcounsel
May 29, 2011, 02:50 AM
Been doing it for years and never an issue. Ensure there's no chance of anything (including your finger) in the trigger well. As long as the holster covers the trigger entirely you're fine.

Zerodefect
May 29, 2011, 06:48 PM
Just be careful and use stiff kydex.
I prefere Raven Concealment holsters and Crossbreed.

With my Ravens type OWB holsters I'll reholster normally at 3-4oclock.

With Crossbreed holsters that I wear further back 4-6oclock, I'll open my right hand and feel for the holsters opening location with my fingertips and drop it in. That keeps the trigger covered on one side, and the leather pad covers the other side. No snagging.

rogerjames
May 29, 2011, 06:59 PM
I don't get it... If you follow the basic safety rules, every pistol is equally safe. If you are are a dumbass, then you should be nervous around every pistol.

I am about to have my first child so I will have to get used to not leaving chambered pistols sitting around...

That being said... if you are nervous about handling your gun, you shouldn't be handling it.

You're post is making me nervous already. Hopefully you will never be in the lane next to me at the range.

sixgunner455
May 29, 2011, 09:34 PM
He has a legitimate concern. It's called "Glock leg."

It's just like what it sounds - something gets into the trigger guard while holstering.

The solution? Be careful, think about what you're doing, and holster slowly. If you can't get comfortable doing that with your XD or Glock, then carry something else.

Sebastian the Ibis
May 30, 2011, 12:16 AM
I second the Kydex. No matter how rigid the leather is, it is going to go soft here in hot humid Florida. Once the leather goes soft you either have to take your holster off, reholster the gun and put it back on, or open the holster up with your fingers, or wiggle the muzzle of the gun in. Options 2 & 3 are just stoopid, and 1 is impractical.. so go for Kydex.

Dimis
May 30, 2011, 12:25 AM
if you are reholstering the danger is over (in a defensive situation)
and we practice the ways we are supposed to fight

if the threat is over take all the time in the world to reholster and even look at what your doing if you have to

never rush the reholster of your weapon because it will never matter how fast you can put it back vs how fast you can get it into action and use it

placing it back in the holster can take as long as you will ever want to take

just my 2

bigfatdave
May 30, 2011, 10:33 AM
never rush the reholster of your weapon

Use a rigidly constructed (leather or plastic is fine, just so it doesn't collapse) holster that covers the trigger.

Just keep your hand off the grip safety (putting your thumb on the back of the slide helps) and reholster.

And there's your three steps to not having your weapon go "bang" when you put it away.

I check for holster safety before carrying with a given gun/holster combination, if anything short of a dedicated effort and a tool can get the trigger moving while the gun is in the holster, the combination fails, if anything threatens the trigger while putting the gun in the holster, the combination fails. (modification may solve those problems, in some cases)

Get quality gear and a belt/holster that keeps the gun-slot where you left it, and understand the passive safety features of your gun, which you should have done with a tool you may use for saving your life already.

ny32182
May 30, 2011, 10:50 AM
I see this behavior from (almost always new) competitors at matches all the time: They load up, then slam the gun back into the holster. I cringe, I advise them against it, but some keep doing it anyway. In this case I know the adrenaline is flowing since you're about the hear the buzzer, but it bears repeating again; there is no need to rush the holstering. Use a stiff holster, make sure clothing is out of the way, and there is nothing to worry about. I've also developed a habit of stepping my strong side leg inward during the holstering of a hot pistol, just as one last safety measure. I don't do it all the time, but if the position affords, I usually will.

Rifleman 173
May 30, 2011, 10:55 AM
Around where I live, we've had 3 police officers accidentally shoot themselves with XD pistols. One guy had to go out on permanent disability. One guy was unloading his gun to clean it, another guy was holstering his on a range when it went off and I'm not sure about the 3rd guy's shooting incident. The guy going to clean his XD put a bullet through his hand and damaged too many nerves in it to go back to work. The officer on the range badly hurt his leg last year and is still off work from his shooting. I carry a Glock and have carried one for about 20 years or so and have never had any problems with putting it into a holster at all. Just try to be careful when you seat it so that the trigger does not catch on the edge of the holster. But even Glocks have had their share of problems when it comes to NDs and ADs.

HoosierQ
May 30, 2011, 11:26 AM
<removed by QB>

rcmodel
May 30, 2011, 11:34 AM
If you kept pressure on the grip safety. the gun could fire.

With no pressure on the grip safety, the gun can't fire.

As noted above, put your thumb on the back of the XD slide when re-holstering and you cannot be squeezing the grip safety down.

rc

harmon rabb
May 30, 2011, 07:31 PM
With a XD, what's there to worry about? Hold the gun so your right thumb is on the rear of the slide and so the grip safety is not engaged.

Zerodefect
May 30, 2011, 09:38 PM
if you are reholstering the danger is over (in a defensive situation)
and we practice the ways we are supposed to fight

if the threat is over take all the time in the world to reholster and even look at what your doing if you have to

never rush the reholster of your weapon because it will never matter how fast you can put it back vs how fast you can get it into action and use it

placing it back in the holster can take as long as you will ever want to take

just my 2

Except if you're only transitioning back to your rifle. Then you're in a hurry to reholster.

Which is why I prefere 1911's during carbine classes.

ET
May 30, 2011, 09:56 PM
It's not the gun, it's the gun owner. Accidents happen mostly because the gun owner is negligent. Whether it's pointing the gun at an unintended target, pulling the trigger thinking that the gun is unloaded or, in this case, reholstering the gun in a less than safe manner. It always comes down to the gun owner being safe with a gun. Improperly reholstering a gun is just as dangerous as any other activity involving a gun. You Tube has several videos showing instructors shooting themselves while reholstering their guns. Anybody can have a moment of stupidity, even instructors. As with any other activity involving a loaded gun, one must be 100% safe when handling their gun. It always comes back to gun safety. It's not the gun, it's the gun owner.

engineermike
May 30, 2011, 10:29 PM
Would some one please tell me why every body thinks that each encounter with a Bad Guy is going to be a quick draw contest? I believe you have to see the treat before you can shoot. (Its the law in most states) So why not take a little time and practice drawing your pistol and chambering a round and see where that gets you. If you do not like the results then maybe a revolver is a better option. If you don't see a threat coming then having a chambered round in you pistol will not matter anyway. Also if you happen to have your gun taken away and the Bad Guy is pointing it at you then you will have a few second advantage because he is going to have to chamber around before he can use it on you. (Its called tactics) Check around because people flash themselves more often than one would think. (Even professional gun handlers) I don't carry 3, 4, or 15 clips with me either, they are too heavy and if I'm in a situation where I'm gonna need that much ammo them I should not have been there in the first place. With a little practice I've found that I can identify a target while drawing my pistol and loading a round into the chamber and firing and not much difference in the time it take to draw load and fire as draw and fire.

sixgunner455
May 31, 2011, 04:11 AM
engineermike, you are having a "my gunfight" moment. You are envisioning what you think will happen when you are called upon to use your weapon, and basing your tactics around the tunnel vision your are allowing yourself to be stuck in.

You cannot guarantee that you will have two hands available to get your gun into action. This is truth, and it allows for Murphy to interfere with what you think will happen in your hypothetical situation. Maybe your other hand is disabled by the initial attack. Maybe it's pushing a bystander aside, or holding a screaming, frightened child behind you. Maybe it's trying to wipe blood out of your eyes while you scramble for cover. Maybe it's desperately keeping the bad guy's weapon hand from getting lined up and close enough to hurt you or someone else. And while your other hand is doing all that, your shooting hand is supposed to magically get your gun out and chamber a round all by itself, with no fumbling??

I don't think so. Think about other possibilities than the assumptions you are making that tell you chamber empty is the way to go. Maybe, for you, for some other reason, it is. But for fighting, for actually protecting yourself, it's a questionable decision, at least. Many police officers in this country carry Glocks, and most carry some other form of auto pistol. Are you really saying that you think that they should be carrying chamber empty? Really?

I hope you're saying, 'oh, of course not, they should carry their guns loaded.' If it's okay for them to carry hot, why not everyone else?

We carry guns to fight with. I say that because we carry them to protect ourselves and our loved ones with, and in order to do that, we have to be prepared to use them to fight with. If we aren't mentally prepared, the gun is useless. If the gun isn't physically ready to go, it is just as useless. A pistol carried for protection should be ready to use, immediately, one handed. Draw it one handed, shoot it one handed. If you can, if you have time, sure, use two. But don't expect to be able to, and practice accordingly, and carry accordingly. Plan for it not to go your way, in other words.

I fully agree with some of what you said - if you aren't comfortable with a gun that doesn't have a safety or a long trigger pull, then carry a gun that has the systems that make you comfortable.

Shadow 7D
May 31, 2011, 05:23 AM
The way it was explained to me
To avoid Glock Leg, one should
Keep the booger hook
OFF the bang switch

If you aren't comfortable with the platform, find one you are.
As for an Israeli draw, it was designed for a standard manual of arms for a service that was stocked with every form of surplus they could beg, borrow, or buy...
AND, isn't used by them today, rather they have a standardized their inventory with modern weapons...

bigfatdave
May 31, 2011, 07:04 AM
engineermike, I hope your wishful thinking doesn't leave you behind if you actually need a weapon someday.

basicblur
May 31, 2011, 11:33 AM
Would some one please tell me why every body thinks that each encounter with a Bad Guy is going to be a quick draw contest?

Hey engineermike-you'll probably enjoy reading this article (http://thinkinggunfighter.blogspot.com/2010/09/myths-of-israeli-method-of-carry-or-why.html)-'specially after you've been accused of tunnel vision! :D

HoosierQ
May 31, 2011, 01:32 PM
If you kept pressure on the grip safety. the gun could fire.

With no pressure on the grip safety, the gun can't fire.

As noted above, put your thumb on the back of the XD slide when re-holstering and you cannot be squeezing the grip safety down.

rc


Yeah...I totally got that backwards didn't I...what a dope. In point of fact, I was trying to convey the message that RCMODEL has pointed out...I just got it totally bass-ackward. I was hoping to have said, ensure pressure is not placed on the grip safety...but failed miserably. My apologies.

engineermike
June 2, 2011, 12:03 AM
All I now for sure is, there are a lot of people pack'n and no body shoot' n. Pull your gun and shoot some bystander and see what happens, let your gun go off accidentally and a your bullet hits some bystander and see what happens. As for only one hand I think that depends of the hand that you don't have, doesn't it. Now I see why there are gun laws.

Mike J
June 2, 2011, 01:40 AM
engineermike-Modern handguns are designed to be carried with a round in the chamber. If you do not feel comfortable doing that it is your choice. As for me I know that things can happen really fast & I want all the help I can get. If carrying without one in the pipe is a good idea why doesn't law enforcement train their officers to carry that way. With proper safety protocol & equipment (a holster that covers the trigger guard) I see no reason not to carry with a round chambered.

REAPER4206969
June 2, 2011, 02:01 AM
Now I see why there are gun laws.

More reading, less posting.

sixgunner455
June 2, 2011, 03:38 AM
Wow. Guess I wasted my breath.

Shadow 7D
June 2, 2011, 03:47 AM
yup, some people never git it
others are troll bait

Jackal1
June 2, 2011, 06:21 AM
As mentioned earlier, you should reholster while carefully avoiding the grip safety. But I did not see anyone list both reasons why:

Sear blocked by grip safety (firing pin will not be released)
Slide blocked (slide will not move out-of-battery)


cheers

FoMoGo
June 2, 2011, 08:11 AM
All I now for sure is, there are a lot of people pack'n and no body shoot' n. Pull your gun and shoot some bystander and see what happens, let your gun go off accidentally and a your bullet hits some bystander and see what happens. As for only one hand I think that depends of the hand that you don't have, doesn't it. Now I see why there are gun laws.
That is why I commonly carry 2 handguns.
I never know what may happen, and can get to a firearm with each hand.
Both are chambered.
You dont touch the trigger till you are on target and ready to stop a threat, and no bystanders are accidentally shot.
Guns dont just "go off".
I see carrying an unchambered semi auto like I see carrying a revolver with an empty cyl.
Both require 2 hands in an emergency situation.
Always plan for the worst case scenario.


Jim

msparks
June 2, 2011, 12:18 PM
My normal summer carry is one of the MIC holsters that goes of the grip area. One of the beauties of this type of carry when I put the holster on I have it pointing in a safe direction. My other holster is a Blackhawk Serpa, again very little change of AD with this style of holster.

Jonah71
June 2, 2011, 12:39 PM
I carry the G-23 chambered at all times. As long as you have a proper holster it's no more dangerous than a DA revolver. I was more concerned when I carried the taurus 24/7 pt pro chambered with the lever safety on. It was very easy to accidentally push it to the hot position and with the SA trigger I was concerned about safety. But the 5+ lb pull of the Glock...it doesn't worry me. I just pay attention when holstering.

engineermike
June 2, 2011, 02:18 PM
Well a gun is never pointed to a safe direction. But thanks everyone for telling me I don't get an opinion. Again, everyone pack'n but no one shoot' n. I'm an old man and it won't take any bad guy long to take me out but that's the way it is. So long "Red Necks".

Zerodefect
June 2, 2011, 02:39 PM
All I now for sure is, there are a lot of people pack'n and no body shoot' n. Pull your gun and shoot some bystander and see what happens, let your gun go off accidentally and a your bullet hits some bystander and see what happens. As for only one hand I think that depends of the hand that you don't have, doesn't it. Now I see why there are gun laws.

Wut?

http://i584.photobucket.com/albums/ss290/zerodefect2533/014.jpg

Shadow 7D
June 3, 2011, 05:39 PM
I know, lets go to...
Black powder
no too dangerous
How bout a 'safety gun'
OK post the Ivor Johnson pics...

Or a gun that has more interlocks that a damn weedeater or Chainsaw, Oh, wait, thats basically an XD.

451 Detonics
June 3, 2011, 05:55 PM
I second the Kydex. No matter how rigid the leather is, it is going to go soft here in hot humid Florida.

I lived in south Texas and Louisiana for years, never had a good quality leather holster go soft. They go soft because they are either cheap or someone feel the need to oil or condition them. All a good leather holster needs is an occasional application of the appropriate color shoe polish. Some of the leather holsters I use today are well over 30 years old and are as stiff as they were when new. Kydex on the other hand is harder on the finish, noisy, does not conceal as well....

As for holster the Glock or similar guns...maintain your holster and buy high quality, use your index finger to guide the gun in by having it along the receiver covering the trigger guard. If something feels wrong stop and look.

Ala Dan
June 3, 2011, 06:17 PM
To Quote An Unnamed Source-

"Just remember too keep your BOOGER PICKER
OFF of the BOOM SWITCH"~!

Shadow 7D
June 3, 2011, 07:15 PM
shhh....
your giving out all the secrets...

foolsgold80z
June 3, 2011, 10:35 PM
deleted

Big_John1961
June 3, 2011, 10:47 PM
to quote an unnamed source-

"just remember too keep your booger picker
off of the boom switch"~!

lol! :D

wheelguy
June 4, 2011, 05:22 PM
A holster related problem that hasn't been mentioned yet - retention straps. If you don't move the strap out of the way while holstering, it could flop inside the trigger guard and pull the trigger for you. Thus, cops with Glock leg syndrome - where a retention method is required.

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