Speer Reloading #10 vs #14


PDA






biogenic
June 4, 2011, 01:41 AM
Any big difference between a Speer #10 and the new Speer #14 manual ? Wanna buy one the #10 is about $7 and the #14 almost $30....

If you enjoyed reading about "Speer Reloading #10 vs #14" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
cfullgraf
June 4, 2011, 09:21 AM
For the cartridges in the Speer #10, there probably is not alot of difference in the data in the #14. But, I do know the 22 Hornet data has changed. Speer now recommends using small pistol primers in the 22 Hornet in their #14 manual. So others may have changed.

There are cartridges listed on Speer #14 that are not in Speer #10. There have been many cartridges introduced since Speer #10 was originally printed.

Unless you are adding to an extensive reloading manual library, i would get the Speer #14.

Walkalong
June 4, 2011, 11:41 AM
Yep, or find #13 on sale. I bought the #14 and have stuck with #13. I do not care for the new format. There is a little bit of new data in #14 though.

mbopp
June 4, 2011, 01:16 PM
Since I have both a #10 and #14......
The #14 one has some newer powders listed that aren't in the old book.
And the #10 came out before Hodgdon made 296 / 110 (and 231 / HP38) the same powder. I still use the data in #10 since I have a can of old H110 in the cabinet.

Clark
June 4, 2011, 02:53 PM
"Speer 3" 1959 44mag 240 gr JSP--------23.0 gr 2400 1564 fps
"Speer 6" 1964 44mag 240 gr JSP--------23.0 gr 2400 1564 fps
"Speer 7" 1966 44mag 240 gr JSP--------23.0 gr 2400 1564 fps
"Speer 8" 1970 44mag 240 gr JSP--------24.0 gr 2400 1574 fps
"Speer 9" 1974 44mag 240 gr JSP--------19.5 gr 2400 1344 fps
"Speer 10" 1979 44mag 240 gr JSP&MSP 22.2 gr 2400 1392 fps.
"Speer 11" 1987 44mag 240 gr JSP&MSP 22.2 gr 2400 1452 fps
"Speer 12" 1994 44mag 240 gr JSP&MSP 17.7 gr 2400 1271 fps
"Speer 13" 1998 44mag 240 gr JSP&MSP 21.0 gr 2400 1434 fps


Vernon Speer was an awesome guy, but he is no longer with us.

gamestalker
June 4, 2011, 06:21 PM
The #10 is a good instructional book and has a lot to offer in that respect. But the data is old, in many circumstances the bullet and powder has beocme obsolete.

NC Cruffler
June 5, 2011, 09:14 AM
Powder formulas change over the years.
Better to keep up with the times. Also, I've found it helpful to use several different (Hornady, Speer, Lyman, VitaVouri and Sierra) manuals on hand to compare loads.

biogenic
June 6, 2011, 02:52 AM
Good stuff - thanks !

Clark
June 6, 2011, 03:46 AM
NC Cruffler
Powder formulas change over the years.
Better to keep up with the times. Also, I've found it helpful to use several different (Hornady, Speer, Lyman, VitaVouri and Sierra) manuals on hand to compare loads.


I thought that the chemical formulas stay the same, but powder varies in speed from batch to batch due to manufacturing tolerance.
The bulk powder is then loaded as with charges appropriate to speed of the batch, while canister powder is blended to an exact speed per a specification with tight tolerances.

I thought that the variation in load books year to year and brand to brand was the result of the unscientific process of lawyered up committees agreeing on fashionable trends in hand load recipes.

ranger335v
June 6, 2011, 05:24 PM
The only valid reason to buy newer loading manuals is for new powders and cartridges. The 'changes' some worry about mostly reflect the differences in the test weapons and the components they have to work with. Since manuals rightly make no claim to be more than a guide and we all have to work up to our own max charges it seems that agonizing over a listed two grain difference of Hodgbones H-1111 powder in one book vs another for my.335 Whizbanger Super Long Magnum is meaningless.

Byron
June 7, 2011, 06:04 PM
The Speer #10 was made before attorneys got involved.Some loads such as 357 Mag are hotter. Any reloader will work up the loads.I find the #10 to still be my favorite manual. I have used the SP and SR primers in my Hornet with no real difference. Byron

MichaelK
June 7, 2011, 06:38 PM
When #10 was published the test data was still being generated with copper crusher equipment (CUP).

By the time #14 was published, most of the data was being generated via piezo-electric instrumentation, and published in PSI.

Being able to measure the pressure in real-time has given the engineers a better ability to "see inside" the cartridge, resulting in numerous alterations to loads, almost always down. Blue Dot loads in .357 for example.

junebug
June 7, 2011, 06:55 PM
Clark
Since you have the older manuels ,do they have any loads for the .303 savage in them ?
I have an old model 99 or 95 not sure what to call it ,it was made in 1895 acording to the serial # and would like some load info. Thanks.

murf
June 7, 2011, 08:39 PM
junebug, look on handloads.com. there are a couple for the 303.

murf

Clark
June 7, 2011, 08:45 PM
OK I scanned Lyman 44 1967 and will pm.

junebug
June 9, 2011, 12:29 AM
Thanks Murf and Clark.Appreciate the help.

junebug

Ol` Joe
June 9, 2011, 12:05 PM
If all you want is load data the web sites of the various powder companies has the latest for free, and they have their newest powders covered. They also cover all the latest cartridges, something most manuals are a couple years behind on. try to find much data in the books on the 6.5 Creedmore or 338-08 Federal.
If you have a specific bullet in mind you want to load for, the bullet companies will often help, but won`t give out their entire chapter of data. One bullet and powder and they`ll work with you if they have tried it and have the info.

bigedp51
June 9, 2011, 12:33 PM
Vintage 1968 Lyman data..............sigh :cool:

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o254/bigedp51/308-762-a-1.jpg

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o254/bigedp51/308-762-b-1.jpg

I prefer the good old days when all the pressures were listed in CUP and you could shoot .308 and 7.62 NATO cartridges without someone telling you your rifle was going to blow up.

As you can see below you can put 32 psi in your tires but if you put 220 kPa in your tires they will blow up and kill everyone in a 300 yard radius. :rolleyes:

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o254/bigedp51/IMGP3024.jpg

Please note CUP is also read as psi and 1/2 a grain of powder won't blowup your rifle.

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o254/bigedp51/168match.jpg

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o254/bigedp51/762match.jpg

If you enjoyed reading about "Speer Reloading #10 vs #14" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!