SIG 1911 GSR- Ultra Mini Range Report


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Cthulhu
January 16, 2004, 02:42 AM
Last night I got to put a very limited amount of rounds through a sample GSR SS. It showed excellent fit and finish, and the slide traveled smoothly yet with no play, similar to a Springfield TRP. The slide, while decidedly Sig inspired, looked appropriate and businesslike on the railed frame. Somehow I managed to cycle the gun with 100% sucess despite a lack of front slide serrations. The external extractor seemed to do its job, inelegant as it is. Functioning of the gun and Novak SS mag was perfect for me with Win Win-Clean (no, I didn't pick the ammo) which, as most people know, puts it reputation for being "clean" before traits like accuracy or feed reliability. The three dot sights were easy to pick up and the accuracy was extremely good, putting all rounds except my hand cycled first shot into a 2" continuous string at 15yds. The aforementioned first shot was a flyer about an 1" away high left, though I'm not arrogant enough to assume it was attributable to a problem with the gun. It was most likely due to it being my first shot ever with this unfamiliar firearm. I'm sure it is capable of better accuracy than I displayed, but I did not have SIG's blessing to really ring it out.

Gripes? The grip safety is ill conceived for human hands. At least this pair of human hands. Instead of a memory bump it has an elongated protrusion that was obviously precision engineered to focus the recoil energy into a sharp point in the middle of the palm. It would be the first thing I would have attended to.
It also displayed the same problem as the early Smith 1911s in that the amount of pressure on the Schwartz-style grip safety and the particular grip chosen has a noticible effect on the trigger pull. Grip the gun high and the trigger was 3-5 lbs heaver than a lower grip that squeezed the GS more. For an all steel 1911 with a rail, it had a surprising amount of muzzle whip. It may be that the springs aren't quite up to snuff or the slide has a different mass and recoil velocity, but the muzzle jump seemed more pronounced than a standard 5" 1911. It reminded me of shooting a Commander with weak springs, rather snappy, but not really difficult to shoot rapidly.
Although I did not experience any problems, other people shooting this particular example reported issues with the Win Clean, mostly failures to feed during a string.

I don't see any reason that the issues with feeding and and grip safety
couldn't be easily resolved before the rest of the guns hit the street. The example I fired had a 3 digit serial, so they may have already worked them out. Price should be comparable with the Kimber Tac Pro, so its in the high mid range for a regular production 1911. Should be attractive to those who like big bore pistols with light rails (you know who you are), and those who can handle mixing a little Sig 220ST into the 1911 gene pool. Those who fall into neither will probably want to wait for the non-railed GS.

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Maddock
January 16, 2004, 08:19 AM
Thanks for the report.

WhoKnowsWho
January 16, 2004, 09:14 AM
Interesting, thanks!

45R
January 16, 2004, 10:59 AM
Thanks for the report. I cant wait to see the production model range report. It looks promising.

George Hill
January 16, 2004, 12:17 PM
Somehow I managed to cycle the gun with 100% sucess despite a lack of front slide serrations.
LOL, That was funny.
:D

Trigger
January 16, 2004, 12:26 PM
Does it have the "Shwantz" grip safety as well?

I'm hoping that they have one at the GAT guns (West Dundee) factory shoot in February. Any place local renting them yet?

Climb14er
January 16, 2004, 12:37 PM
How many rounds did you put through the GSR? I've read some other reports of shooters having only three rounds to try at the Sig demos.

Cthulhu
January 16, 2004, 01:54 PM
As I mentioned in my post, it appears that it does indeed have the Schwartz style grip safety like the S&W 1911, and displayed the same problem with the grip safety pressure/trigger relationship that the early Smiths had.

How many rounds did you put through the GSR? I've read some other reports of shooters having only three rounds to try at the Sig demos.

I must have been lucky. I fired 2 mags loaded with 7 rounds a piece.

Trigger, I can't say with 100% certainty, but they should have one to fire at the factory shoot. Only one way to find out.


<edjtd fur speling>

ajacobs
January 16, 2004, 04:16 PM
I have not handled one so certainly you know better but my understanding is that the sig is series 80 which can directly effect the trigger as the trigger disengages the saftey. The Kimber II and the S&W use the swartz wich is disengaged by the grip saftey.

On another point:

Are you saying the drip saftey has a "dorsal fin" like the old colt XS series?

Edit: It looks like it does now from the picture on sig's website. I never noticed it before.

M1911
January 17, 2004, 04:15 PM
Are you saying the drip saftey has a "dorsal fin" like the old colt XS series?I sure hope not. I shot a Colt XS with one of those grip safeties and hated it.

Sean Smith
January 17, 2004, 05:05 PM
I belive the grip safeties are identical between the old Colt XS vs. the Sig GSR.

Note that the current Colts with beavertails (Special Combat Government and Gunsite) don't use the XS beavertail, but rather the nice Smith & Alexander.

Cthulhu
January 18, 2004, 03:34 AM
Actually, I must correct the earlier post. I assumed that the trigger pull issue was due to the pressure of the GS on the firing pin block. Having disassembled the pistol, I discovered that it is indeed a series 80 type, so the trigger controls the FP block. I believe that the trigger issue is due to the trigger being rough and inconsistent, and the grip safety pressure needed to deactivate it is on the high side, so I read it as a false indication of the presence of a Schwartz style safety. After handling and dry fire, the trigger has smoothed up and lightened some, and the GS is feeling lighter. The "dorsal fin", as it has come to be known, is still deplorable. I prefer the Wilson/S&A style or the Ed Brown, and I would require that the Kimber have its protrusion shaved off as well. At least swapping it out won't impair function or safety of the design.

BluesBear
January 18, 2004, 01:33 PM
Those who fall into neither will probably want to wait for the non-railed GS. Any idea when the non-rail GS will be available?

Since it is Series 80 instead of Schwartz, when they make it without a rail I'll be interested.

Trigger
January 19, 2004, 09:21 AM
I had a chance to check out the sig 1911 this weekend thankfully to a great guy at the gunshop and here are my thoughts on the gun.

-Slide-frame fit is pretty good.
-Strongly, and I mean strongly dislike the keyed locking mechanism on the right side of the SLIDE!. It looks like the lock that is on the Springfield's MSH but this is built into the slide.
-Dislike the light rail but some may prefer it.
-The grip safety is intolerable. I just coouldn't stand it.
-Trigger is not only ugly but had a some creep to it.
-To me it just doesn't have the 1911 lines to it.

It'll be interesting to shoot though. It's definately an attempt at lawyer proofing the gun.

Logistics
January 20, 2004, 02:05 AM
I would have to agree wholeheartedly with Cthulhu's staggeringly accurate "mini range report". I too have handled and shot a few rounds through Sig's newest in the lineup. I "played" with it for over an hour total and came to many of the same conclusions. The grip safety is diffrent just for the sake of being diffrent, not functional. The locking mechanism is in a horrible place on the side of the slide destroying the clean lines of the firearm. Lack of front slide serrations are a nice touch, while again on the downside, this $1000 pistol has the trigger of an Armsco or or the "similar" S&W 1911. Hopefully after a few rounds it could find it's way to being halfway decent. Accuracy of this pistol was good as was it's feel in the hands. Fit and finish was above average, however it was very jumpy and I felt kicked alot for a pistol of this weight. In conclusion, for less than $1000 I think I would rather have a reworked P220 or for slightly more I would be happier with a Springfield TRP. However to truly make a fair decision I would want to wait and see for the blued steel version and wait another year for Sig to work out some of the bugs (if any) in the production of this pistol possibly refining it further. Is it a good pistol??? Go decide for yourself!

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