Tikka T3 Sporter


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Katigroszek
June 9, 2011, 03:37 PM
A friend of mine bought Tikka T3 Sporter 6,5x55 SE (longer bareled version - 24" if I can remember, but no muzzle thread). He wanted to adjust the trigger so he had to remove the stock (the trigger adjusting screws can be reached only with the action removed from the stock). Owner's manual instructed how to make the needed adjustment, so he figured it was "do it yourself" kind of regulation. And then he contacted Tikka distributor to give him momentum figures for tightening the action-to-stock screwes down to the corect torque. The distributor refused to give the needed data, because, he said, it is beyond what the owner should do with the rifle himself or the guarantee is void.

Of course the position of the distributor is idiotic and would not withstand closer examination if my friend would need to exercise his rights, should the need of guarantee repair arise, but does anyone know the exact amount of torque that the gun manufacturer says should be applied to the stock fitting bolts in that rifle model?

Could anyone help me (well, actually him), please?

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DIM
June 9, 2011, 04:25 PM
on t3 tactical I found 45 inch/pound front and 40 rear be optimal I think it should be same for sporter.

vaupet
June 9, 2011, 04:49 PM
don't know about the torque but I am considering the sporter in 6.5x55 myself so I would very much appreciate a range review o some sort.

greetz

Peter

Katigroszek
June 9, 2011, 04:58 PM
You sure about that, DIM? I don't know... T3 Tactical has a plastic stock, if I'm not mistaken, and my friend's Sporter has a laminate one... Doesn't it affect the torque?

It is unfortunately the same with my TRG 22 - when it comes to bolting the action to alu profile user's manual only says: "tighten the fastening screws" :-/ - no exact torque info...

Vaupet - we will probably shoot at long range match on 9th of July (1200m max) so perhaps I will write something if You're interested. What I can say now (I fired only a few shots untill now - owner was "braking in" the barell) is that the stock is pretty comfortable and it roughly resembles the TRG stock - most everybody can get into a comfortable shooting position (well - 5 of us could) with ease. But the magazine well is BIG (large gap around the magazine bottom) and shooting standing in a classic sporting position in not comfy. The gun has all the parts that do not take load during firing made of plastic (including the triggerguard). Plastic magazines feel cheap (but do work well). I do not like the way the bolt dissasembles (but it is done seldom and mostly at home; still - I got spare firing pin for my gun and like the posibility to change it in the field should the pin get damaged i.e. from a pierced primer), but admit that the bolt opens and closes with much less effort than in my gun, that was almost twice that price. Adjustable cheekpiece in very nicely executed! Better that TRG's.

The gun has Sako's own 16mm rail atop the receiver and it accepts all the Sako mounts (including the tactical one piece bases) but has only one groove for mounts' stop-pin, so they can be mounted in one position only (TRG has several grooves for stopping pin, so the mounts can be more finely adjusted in froward-rearward position if needed).

I understand that comparing that two rifles is not wise, as they're entirely different purpose (well, they both should hit what You aim for, but I'm sure You know what I mean) and construction philosophy, but they have some features in common and I got those two and M63 and M80 swedish mausers on hand so...)

viking499
June 9, 2011, 11:52 PM
I was told by Tikka one time that any modifications, other than how it came out of the box, done to the gun by the owner would void the warranty. And all I was asking about was swapping the stock...............

DIM
June 10, 2011, 02:39 PM
I think it shouldn't make much of the difference, they way I found my optimal is by trial, I started with 35 - 30 then 40 - 35, then 45 -40, at that point riffle start to shoot one hole groups so I stopped.

Katigroszek
June 10, 2011, 04:28 PM
Thanks, DIM! I told that to my buddy and he'll see if it works for him. Perhaps it would be wise to repeat Your procedure with that particular gun.

Viking499 - my exprience is that Polish Sako/Tikka distributor has weird ideas about those things too, which does not mean that they will work (in court of law) the way thay thing they will (I'm talking about polish law, so it does not necessarily apply to US regulations). Removing the stock in Tikka Sporter is needed to adjust the trigger, which is described in user's manual delivered with the gun, not some armorer's manual. So making the adjustment is just general maintenance which the gun's manufacturer thought could be made by the owner, not professional gunsmith. Changing the stock is much like it, since it does not require to alter the gun in any permanent way. So the manufacturer could refuse to repair or exchange damaged gun only if the damage itself would result from the aftermarket stock and the way it works with the gun. But again - I'm not sure how it looks in the US.

In my Anschuetz 1907/2013 rimfire gun the heads of the screws and bolts which the gun maker thought should not be touched by anybody but official Anschuetz service are protected by a layer of a lacquer that works as a seal showing that they were not worked by the owner (their adjustment is not covered in owner's manual). None of the stock to action bolts are sealed that way and the owner's manual shows how to change stocks and manufacturer provides special imbus wrench with marks to apply correct torque to different weight stocks... Germans made it clear, Fins are ploting, trying to safeguard from all possible resposibility for their products... but the guns they made are fine.

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