Ruger 1022 Questions


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fbernar
June 10, 2011, 02:55 AM
Greetings everyone! I am very new to rifles and I have gone to the range before to shoot my 10/22 and noticed that the stock barrel gets VERY hot when I shoot quickly and in volume.

1. I am thinking about getting the Tapco Intrafuse stock and was wondering if the stock barrel gets too hot to allow for the Tapco stock to be used if shooting in volume? Will it burn the plastic used to make the Tapco stock?


2. Also, is the Tapco stock good for target shooting (non-competitive) of about 35 to 100 yards or should I go a different route? Is it good for using scopes (I have a Nikon Prostaff 3-9x40) or is it more built towards using tactical optics such as a redot or something along those lines?

3. I see a lot of people recommending the VQ trigger mods as one of the first things to do to increase accuracy on a 1022. Not specific to a Ruger, but is a trigger pull under 3 or 4 pounds safe for a rifle that one would possibly allow children to plink with or would it increase the accidental discharge risk?

Thanks in advance!

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Davek1977
June 10, 2011, 03:24 AM
I don't think you have ANYTHING to worry about. I run Tapco furniture on my AK, and while the barrel will actually be smoking and way too hot to touch after a few mag dumps, the Galil hand-guard has never shown any indication of warping or melting, and these temps would be much higher than those you'd generate with a .22LR

Breakmyfootoff
June 10, 2011, 03:26 AM
1: I've had a 10/22 in a synthetic stock before and rapidly shot several magazines (including 50 rounders) through it with no problems. I wouldnt think you'd have any problems from heat.

2:The original stock is probably going to be more accurate however, as the Tapco collapsible stocks tend to have some wobble to them. I painted the original stock on my current 10/22 flat olive drab green, which gives it a distinctly military look and keeps the functionality of the wood stock. That might be something you want to try first since it only costs about 5.00 compared to the 100.00 for the Tapco, and I think most would agree that the original stock is far better than the Tapco. Either stock will work fine with both types of optics you mentioned.

3: Accidental discharge can occur with any trigger, teaching proper safety habits and close supervision is the key to shooting safely with your children. My 9 year old has a Savage bolt action 22 with the accutrigger set at the lightest setting (2.5 lbs) and he shoots my Glocks, AR, and AK, but I'm on him like a hawk, and proper gun safety is just normal for him since it's been the way I've made him shoot from day one.

fbernar
June 10, 2011, 03:27 AM
I don't think you have ANYTHING to worry about. I run Tapco furniture on my AK, and while the barrel will actually be smoking and way too hot to touch after a few mag dumps, the Galil hand-guard has never shown any indication of warping or melting, and these temps would be much higher than those you'd generate with a .22LR

Ok good to hear! I don't want to dump out 100 rounds just to smell plastic melting! haha :)

fbernar
June 10, 2011, 03:29 AM
Breakmyfoot,

Thanks for the feedback! My issue is that I don't want to have to drill into the synthetic stock to install a swivel stud so I can use a bipod. The RFP stock (synthetic) also has a barrel band and I am not sure how it would look together. I have another thread on a swivel stud that you can view here:
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=596233

Breakmyfootoff
June 10, 2011, 04:17 AM
If it were me, I'd just go ahead and try drilling the stock for the swivel stud. I think that would be a more solid mount as opposed to the stud clamped in the barrel band anyway. It's only my opinion, but I think it'd look fine. Worst case scenario is it doesnt work out and you end up having to buy an aftermarket stock anyway, in which case you havent really lost anything.

fbernar
June 11, 2011, 02:37 AM
I'm not a tool person. :(

Average Joe
June 11, 2011, 02:36 PM
Yes they get hot. Its normal.

Onward Allusion
June 11, 2011, 03:24 PM
1. I am thinking about getting the Tapco Intrafuse stock and was wondering if the stock barrel gets too hot to allow for the Tapco stock to be used if shooting in volume? Will it burn the plastic used to make the Tapco stock?

First hand experience... I have the ATI stock and no it will not melt or warp, but it is not as accurate as the OEM wood stock.

Maverick223
June 12, 2011, 12:36 AM
1. No worries here.
2. Wouldn't be my choice for the stated purpose, but that depends upon what you consider an acceptable group to be. As mentioned in the other thread, I own and like both the Fajen Legacy adjustable variant as well as the Boyd's "Tacticool". There are plenty of other options, but of the ones I tried the aforementioned worked best for me. You may find a different one that works better for you, but I would recommend one that is well bedded, free-floating, and tight (typically precludes collapsible/folding stocks).
3. 3lbs is generally considered to be the limit of safe trigger pressure for sporting use. For target use most anything is acceptable. Children need only be taught safe handling (no matter the trigger pull, safety engagement, loaded condition, or anything else), the rules needn't be modified.

:)

fbernar
June 13, 2011, 09:46 PM
Thanks guys. Would you say the Fajen or Boyd stocks are less or more accurate than stock?

Maverick223
June 14, 2011, 12:01 AM
The Fajen definitely promotes accuracy when compared to the factory stock. As are many aftermarket options (though, as noted earlier, some are worse...just depends upon workmanship and feature-set).

:)

Onward Allusion
June 14, 2011, 12:05 PM
fbernar (http://www.thehighroad.org/member.php?u=154793)
Thanks guys. Would you say the Fajen or Boyd stocks are less or more accurate than stock?

IMO, Fajen stocks are both good-looking and functional (i.e. accurate).

Red Cent
June 14, 2011, 07:32 PM
Semantics. No stock is accurate but lends to the intrinsic accuracy. A wooden stock, lamianted or not, lends to accuracy. Proper bedding of the barreled action in a wood stock, laminated or not, lends to accuracy. In a 10-22, a good barrel lends to accuracy. The factory 10-22 usually has an atrocious trigger pull because of weight and rough surfaces.

The PC hammer and adjustable sear is the best way to go. Drop in.

The bedding of the barreled action is another book.

No need to reinvent the wheel. Everything you wanted to know.........

http://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=220

Jon_Snow
June 14, 2011, 08:18 PM
A wooden stock, lamianted or not, lends to accuracy.

Are you saying that wood stocks are inherently more accurate than synthetic ones? If so, why? My understanding is that synthetic is often preferred since it won't warp nearly as much with changes in humidity/temperature. I'll also observe that most of the benchrest shooters I know prefer McMillan and similar fiberglass stocks due to their stiffness.

To the OP, I love the Fajen. Regardless of any inherent accuracy difference between wood vs. synthetic, the ability to adjust it just right for you will make a world of difference.

fbernar
June 14, 2011, 08:44 PM
What stocks are these?

http://i1183.photobucket.com/albums/x469/hoytcanon/034RFC.jpg

http://i1183.photobucket.com/albums/x469/hoytcanon/0312.jpg

I see that the barrel is floating and I [somewhat] understand how it works with point of impact changing in humidity and heat. Since I live in central Florida where humidity is very high and where the heat is intense, I think that this may help me - correct? Well the stocks above seem to have short barrels or maybe that is me just being a rifle noob. Is that the case? Or are they long and normal sized barrels and I am just stupid?! :)

Also, where can I buy the stock posted above? Is it made for a .920 barrel or stock? I prefer to shop on sites that have different methods of shipping (offering over night or 2 day) as I am impatient. :)

fbernar
June 14, 2011, 09:13 PM
Also, is the above stock okay/good for shooting outdoors and hunting squirrel sometimes? I am 25 and in good shape so I don't THINK the weight would matter. I would not be hiking for miles or anything like that. I would also attach a stud for a bipod in the immediate future upon deciding on a stock.

Maverick223
June 14, 2011, 11:23 PM
All three of the above appear to be Boyd's Evolution stocks (with the one in the top link having a something like the "Tacticool" finish, the one shown top of bottom link finished in "Black Widow" and the bottom "Sky"). IMO they are a very good stock for the money.

:)

fbernar
June 15, 2011, 01:33 AM
Good for hunting as well? .920 barrel good for hunting?

fbernar
June 15, 2011, 03:23 AM
Ended up making a move on a sale Boyd is offering.

Bought the following:

Stock - Evolution Sky (http://www.boydsgunstocks.com/EVOLUTION-RUGER-10-22-RIGHT-OR-LEFT-HAND-p/600-511.htm)

Barrel - ER Shaw Fluted .920 18" (http://www.boydsgunstocks.com/RUGER-10-22-920-BARREL-p/100-505.htm)

Ordered with next day air delivery since I am impatient. Will be adding a stud or two for a bipod and maybe a vertical grip. What do you guys think? Great for hunting squirrel and varmint?

Maverick223
June 15, 2011, 10:07 AM
Good for hunting as well? .920 barrel good for hunting?Personally I think a bull barrel is unnecessarily heavy (with the exception of the Tactical Solutions barrel whick is lighter than a OEM sporter barrel) for hunting, but that is up to the shooter. If weight isn't an issue that barrel should serve you well.

Let us know how it performs.

:)

Red Cent
June 15, 2011, 11:50 AM
The factory barrel can be made to be as accurate as a "match"/bull barrel.
There is a combination of services performed by some that helps accuracy significantly.

The factory barrel is loosely chambered. The specs are generous to accomodate the worst of rounds maker.

The process on the factory barrel consists of removing metal and squaring the chamber end of the barrel. Then the barrel is "rechambered" to a match chamber such as the Bentz. This requires the bullet and the case, when chambered, to enter the rechambered portion under tight specs. With a true match chamber, the 10-22 would have difficulty in extracting a live round the chamber is so tight. Some barrel makers document this warning with receipt of barrel.

The bolt face/breech face is squared and metal removed to provide a more precise headspace securely trapping the case against the chamber. Locked up at both ends spells accuracy.

But the bull barrel looks much better in that stock you selected.

Okiebate
June 15, 2011, 12:25 PM
Oh no.. started on the 10/22 this could go on for pages...
But anyway my buddy has a 10/22 with a tapco stock on it and he loves it. Theres so many things you can do to those guns, just have fun with it.

JG727
June 15, 2011, 12:47 PM
fbernar,

I really love The High Road, but if you want really specific knowledge for your 10/22 I HIGHLY recommend that you at least check out a few threads at Rimfire Central (http://rimfirecentral.com).

those guys and gals are experts, and more than willing to help out anyone who posts a question.

They have entire areas just devoted to 10/22 stock, 10/22 actions, etc.

fbernar
June 15, 2011, 01:22 PM
Thanks guys! I'll try the other forum for 10/22 specific questions and will take the advice given. The parts come in Friday along with a VQ hammer. I'll let you guys know how it goes after that!

Maverick223
June 15, 2011, 06:34 PM
The factory barrel can be made to be as accurate as a "match"/bull barrel.I don't doubt that those modifications help (as would cutting a more precise crown), but I seriously doubt that you can achieve "match grade" accuracy out of the Ruger barrel, simply because the rifling isn't cut (or rather pushed through) to precise specifications. Honestly though, the "poor accuracy" of the stock 10/22 is greatly exaggerated, the rifle (as delivered) is usually capable of more than acceptable hunting rifle accuracy (I haven't seen one that didn't produce dead squirrels at 25yds., or better, with relative ease).

:)

Red Cent
June 15, 2011, 09:33 PM
There are some renowned firms that perform the aforementioned process. Some 10-22 owners love to build sleepers by this process. You would be very surprised with the results. It is not a cure-all but an inexpensive way to trap some suckers. A bunch are MOA out to a 100 yards.

fbernar
June 16, 2011, 05:48 AM
How do you cut a precise crown on a ER Shaw fluted barrel @_@

Maverick223
June 16, 2011, 10:24 AM
There are some renowned firms that perform the aforementioned process. Some 10-22 owners love to build sleepers by this process. You would be very surprised with the results. It is not a cure-all but an inexpensive way to trap some suckers. A bunch are MOA out to a 100 yards.I don't doubt that at all...wouldn't be surprised if it gave some of the lower-end bull barrels a run for their money either, just doubt that it could complete with folks that build a match-grade bbl like Lilja. Pretty cool little project nonetheless, do you happen to know what it will set you back?

How do you cut a precise crown on a ER Shaw fluted barrelIt's already there...as is a Bentz chamber, so you're good to go. You have a pretty good bbl, and would have to spend a fair amount more to yield significantly better accuracy.

:)

Red Cent
June 16, 2011, 11:46 AM
One of the better known.

http://www.ct-precision.com/

If a person lacks the tools and the ability to perform these tasks, a "give me the works" would not be that expensive. And you have recourse with Randy.

This guy is legendary for his work.

http://sites.google.com/site/quesplace/

http://dearbornsguns.webs.com/ratesservices.htm

Maverick223
June 16, 2011, 01:43 PM
Thanks for the information, I was aware of most of all of the folks listed, but didn't know anyone moved the barrel back and re-chambered it (as you mentioned), nor would thread the bbl & action instead of using the OEM "V-block". Purty neat!

:)

Onward Allusion
June 18, 2011, 06:00 PM
Last night...I combined a basic stock Ruger 10/22 action/trigger with a stock 16.5" barrel, dropped it into an Blackhawk Axiom stock w/cheek piece and added a TruGlo red dot on top. Went to the range and tried it out today at 25 yards... After zeroing, it hit the same bullet hole shot after shot. I know it was only 25 yards, but I was very surprised because the barrel and the action was on different guns and they never did this well. The only thing that changed was the addition of the Axiom stock. I think it might be something to do with the free floating barrel.

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