How much ammo can one travel with


PDA






BIGGBAY90
June 10, 2011, 09:45 PM
How much ammo can one travel with from one state to another in an automobile, is there a limit on what can be carried

If you enjoyed reading about "How much ammo can one travel with" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
DougW
June 10, 2011, 09:53 PM
Around here, how much can you carry?:neener:

Don't know about NY, but there are no restrictions around here.

guntech59
June 10, 2011, 09:59 PM
No restrictions in NYS.

Old krow
June 10, 2011, 10:01 PM
17860 rounds of 5.56 is about where I draw the line.

oneounceload
June 10, 2011, 10:07 PM
How strong are your shocks and springs?

Friends went X-country the other year....they shoot sporting clays......they started with almost 30 flats............that's over 750#............

I guess if you have a 1-ton duelly and a gooseneck, you could haul a LOT

Kliegl
June 10, 2011, 10:31 PM
This is the United States of America, and whatever amount of whatever legal
items you want to carry in your car is your own business.

bigfatdave
June 11, 2011, 12:02 AM
1- why would there be a limit?
2 - how much time do you spend getting your vehicle searched anyway?

weeniewawa
June 11, 2011, 12:23 AM
look at the weight ratings on your tires

Hocka Louis
June 11, 2011, 10:26 AM
I flew to the interior of Alaska with 10 rounds of Buffalo Bore Low-Recoil .44 Mag. Otherwise...

But, wait a minute! A national limit on moving ammo!? Fuel. Public roads. Fire safety. Creating a public danger. I LOVE it -- thanks!!!!

Attorney General Eric Holder

geekWithA.45
June 11, 2011, 10:28 AM
The only restriction I know if is 11 lbs in an airplane. By car, none at all.

Larry Ashcraft
June 11, 2011, 11:03 AM
We once went to the NRA Whittington Center with 7000 rounds of ammo in a Ford Taurus. Granted, a large part of it was 22lr, but there was plenty of shotgun and centerfire stuff too.

It never crossed my mind that I might need someone's "permission" to do that.

BIGGBAY90
June 11, 2011, 12:29 PM
Do you think if you got pulled over by a le that there would be a problem

22-rimfire
June 11, 2011, 12:38 PM
No limits as far as I know. One case of 22LR is 5,000 rounds. Wouldn't be very hard to transport 50,000 rounds in a normal car.

Why would a LEO be even interested or notice unless there were suspicions the transporter was hauling other stuff?

Ramone
June 11, 2011, 02:38 PM
waitaminnit...

Some states have some odd ball resrictions on some types of ammo- I am not sure about Jersey& Hollowpoints, but I am pretty sure that Mass has a out right ban on possessing .50BMG ammo.

Edited to add: Apparently I misunderstood MAs laws- it seems you need a liscense to possess ammo of any type, and while FOPA _should_ cover you, it might not.

I don't know about limits on quantities, but you might run across some limitations on types in certain states.

danprkr
June 11, 2011, 02:44 PM
In TX? All you can carry plus one box.

Justin123
June 11, 2011, 02:48 PM
The problem lies with what will be done to you for carrying a bunch of ammo regardless of the legality.

NavyLCDR
June 11, 2011, 02:52 PM
The only restriction I know if is 11 lbs in an airplane.

That is only a specific airline restriction, not a statutory restriction.

Bigdog57
June 11, 2011, 03:16 PM
Down here, a cop might ask where you are going to shoot? If you have something 'interesting', he might come on out to shoot it a bit.
With our drought going on though, they'd probably bust your chops if you had tracers..... ;)
Had one TPD cop who was more interested in my C&B revolver than my buddy's full auto toy next bench over. He had a ball cracking off that BP!

Gotta love Florida cops. :cool:

BIGGBAY90
June 11, 2011, 04:15 PM
the problem lies with what will be done to you for carrying a bunch of ammo regardless of the legality.
good responce-----i wonder

hammerklavier
June 11, 2011, 04:19 PM
A while back there was a thread about the Hoover dam, they wouldn't let anyone drive across with more than -- was it 500 or 1000 rounds of ammo?

rcmodel
June 11, 2011, 04:36 PM
How much ammo can one travel with from one state to another in an automobile,It depends on whether or not your car catches on fire and a TV news crew shows up.

I watched a Live Action News report on a pick-up truck fire on I-35 last year, and the breathless lady reporter said:
"Firefighters & Police had found an automatic rifle and a huge cache of ammo in the truck.
Traffic was being detoured until the situation was once again under control it it was safe to pass by.
Stay tuned for a follow-up story!
Pant! Pant!"

Turns out it was a slightly charred Ruger 10/22, and a half a brick of fricasseed .22 RF ammo!

rc

ElvinWarrior
June 11, 2011, 04:45 PM
Tooling down the road, hauling your 3/4 scale reproduction civil war gatlling gun hanging off your bumper...

Me thinks it's not the 10,000 rounds of 45/70's thats going to get the red lights flashing.... but rather, that damned gun....

Sincerely,

ElvinAWarrior... aka... David, "EW"

Hocka Louis
June 11, 2011, 06:00 PM
Maybe she was breathless because she finally met a guy with a gun and was turned on. She does work in a newsroom after all...

22-rimfire
June 11, 2011, 08:52 PM
I have read that having ammunition in your car in NJ can be a problem if you are not on your way to the range.

ihctractor
June 11, 2011, 09:09 PM
I believe the maximum gross weight on national highways is 80,000 lbs.
Not sure how many .22 rimfires that converts to but I'll bet it's more than I'll ever have to worry about:)

BIGGBAY90
June 11, 2011, 09:26 PM
I have read that having ammunition in your car in NJ can be a problem if you are not on your way to the range.
I wonder about that, must check it out

Zach S
June 11, 2011, 09:44 PM
Depends. If you drive a tin can with a sewing machine motor, like a Smart ForTwo, you cant take as much as I could in my 93 Caprice Wagon...

x_wrench
June 11, 2011, 10:02 PM
It depends on whether or not your car catches on fire and a TV news crew shows up.

I watched a Live Action News report on a pick-up truck fire on I-35 last year, and the breathless lady reporter said:
"Firefighters & Police had found an automatic rifle and a huge cache of ammo in the truck.
Traffic was being detoured until the situation was once again under control it it was safe to pass by.
Stay tuned for a follow-up story!
Pant! Pant!"

Turns out it was a slightly charred Ruger 10/22, and a half a brick of fricasseed .22 RF ammo!


now isn't that a typical media reaction. talk about making a mountain out of a mole hill! somehow, it seems really strange that so many people just blindly believe anything they are told from reporters. how is it that they have any real credibility concerning firearms with reporting like that? and yet, they are our biggest opponent. how does that work? oh yeah, they OWN the BOOB TUBE STATIONS!

Sooner1911
June 11, 2011, 10:13 PM
MY understanding from reading Chapter 3 of the NYC administrative code dealing with firearms, it is illegal to possess ammo in the city (all 5 boroughs) unless you have a firearms permit. I would not want to get pulled over any where in the city, for example going through from CT or LI on the way to Jersey or points west with any ammunition. Given the attitude here, I am sure it would be guilty until proven innocent. Anywhere else, I have been popped for speeding with a trunk full of shotguns and shells on the way to the range. They didn't ask and I didn't tell.

Malamute
June 12, 2011, 01:33 AM
I know someone that sells ammo. I believe they take 5-7 pallets of ammo at a time, perhaps more. They use a 1 ton dually and heavy duty cargo trailer. I sort of recall hearing that they carry up to 12,000 lbs per show at times, tho I may be low on the weight. Don't believe they have to do anything special to cart ammo around.

BIGGBAY90
June 12, 2011, 03:02 PM
i know someone that sells ammo. I believe they take 5-7 pallets of ammo at a time, perhaps more. They use a 1 ton dually and heavy duty cargo trailer. I sort of recall hearing that they carry up to 12,000 lbs per show at times, tho i may be low on the weight. Don't believe they have to do anything special to cart ammo around.
must be an ffl holder

swinokur
June 12, 2011, 03:13 PM
As mentioned, the Hoover Dam separates AZ and NV and had a 1000 round limit IIRC. The new bridge bypass solves that issue now

Malamute
June 13, 2011, 01:03 AM
BIGGBAY90

Quote:
Originally Posted by malamute
i know someone that sells ammo. I believe they take 5-7 pallets of ammo at a time, perhaps more. They use a 1 ton dually and heavy duty cargo trailer. I sort of recall hearing that they carry up to 12,000 lbs per show at times, tho i may be low on the weight. Don't believe they have to do anything special to cart ammo around.

must be an ffl holder


Why? It doesn't take an FFL to sell or buy ammo, nor transport so far as I know.

WardenWolf
June 13, 2011, 01:15 AM
If you get found with an excessive amount of ammunition in many states, you can expect to at least spend a night in the police station while they question you and / or try to find something to charge you with, often threatening you with severe charges to try to get you to plead guilty to something lesser that will still strip your firearms rights. That happened once to some poor guy driving through New Jersey with legally transported firearms.

Bottom line: while it may technically be legal, some states have very vaguely worded statutes that they can use to detain and even charge you if they want.

Crash_Test_Dhimmi
June 13, 2011, 02:14 AM
American Airlines are real #*$&%#'s when it comes to ammo. 11 lbs is what the website tells you. But you have to dig deeper to realize that it is 5lbs max per bag. so to carry 11lbs (TSA max) you will have to have 3 bags checked. So 3xs whatever insane bag fees, and AA hoses you. Im surprised they havent figured out they could probably charge you an additional ORM-D fee on top of everything. No one tell them that.

Davek1977
June 13, 2011, 03:37 AM
must be an ffl holder

No, there is no federal laws limiting the amount of ammo one can own or transport at any given times. Some states may have laws regarding this, but having FFL means nothing in terms of transporting laege amounts of ammo

MachIVshooter
June 13, 2011, 04:41 AM
The problem lies with what will be done to you for carrying a bunch of ammo regardless of the legality.

And what would that be?

Aside from killing your shocks and wearing out tires quickly, there's no problem with loading your vehicle to GVWR with ammo.

I believe the maximum gross weight on national highways is 80,000 lbs.

For standard trucks, yes. There are exceptions/exemptions/provisions for larger, though I don't think the desire to haul 200 million rounds of ammo qualifies under any of them

Jeff F
June 13, 2011, 10:37 AM
I believe the maximum gross weight on national highways is 80,000 lbs.

Only true in certain states. Here we pull triples and super side dumps and our permits are good for 137,000 Lbs gross.

BIGGBAY90
June 14, 2011, 09:39 PM
If you get found with an excessive amount of ammunition in many states, you can expect to at least spend a night in the police station while they question you and / or try to find something to charge you with, often threatening you with severe charges to try to get you to plead guilty to something lesser that will still strip your firearms rights. That happened once to some poor guy driving through New Jersey with legally transported firearms.

Bottom line: while it may technically be legal, some states have very vaguely worded statutes that they can use to detain and even charge you if they want.
I wonder

The Lone Haranguer
June 14, 2011, 10:40 PM
There are a number of limitations (depending on the state) on how to carry your ammo. I know of no limitations on how much you can carry.

GRIZ22
June 15, 2011, 01:27 AM
I have read that having ammunition in your car in NJ can be a problem if you are not on your way to the range.

It may arise someone's suspicions if you had ammo in a car in NJ but its not against the law to have ammo in your car except...hollowpoints...less you are going to the range or hunting. Yes NJ law says you can be arrested for one hollowpoint bullet and in the past there have been. The hollowpoint law has only been used as an add on charge if you are caught in some other violation for the past ten years or so. I've asked people to cite a case or a news article of someone being charged with only hollowpoints in the past ten years but no one has been able to do so.

But yes, possession of hollowpoints in NJ if you are not home, bringing them home from the store, going to the range, or going hunting is against the law.

EOD Guy
June 15, 2011, 01:43 PM
The only restriction I know if is 11 lbs in an airplane.
That is only a specific airline restriction, not a statutory restriction.

No, it's a legal restriction imposed by the International Civil Air Organization and is incorporated by reference in the DOT Hazmat Regulations in 49 CFR. The actual regulatory limit is 5 kilograms, gross weight. It is stated in section 2.3.2.1 of the Dangerous Goods Regulations.

swinokur
June 15, 2011, 02:06 PM
from Alaska Airlines web site:


Firearms / Shooting Equipment

The following items may be included in your normal baggage allowance. Excess charges will apply for additional pieces of baggage. All items must be suitably packaged for transport.


Shooting Equipment
One rifle case with rifles, scopes, one shooting mat, noise suppressors and small tools, or
One shotgun case with shotguns, or
One pistol case with pistols, noise suppressors, one pistol telescope and small pistol tools
Ammunition—On Alaska Airlines flights 001-999 and flights 2000-2999, up to 50 lbs.(domestic) and 11 lbs. (international - where permitted) may be checked. Customers checking in or connecting to Alaska Airlines flights 3450-3499 are limited to 11 lbs. of ammunition. Ammunition must be securely packed in the original manufacturer's package or in a container designed for ammunition and of sufficient strength to protect it from accidental crushing or discharge (i.e. wood, fiber, plastic, or metal). The projectile must be no larger than 11/16" in diameter, the size of a dime. Ammunition may be checked with or separately from the firearm. Spent ammunition shells will be accepted in checked baggage provided they meet the same acceptance procedures as live ammunition (e.g. packed in a crush-proof case).

NavyLCDR
June 15, 2011, 03:47 PM
No, it's a legal restriction imposed by the International Civil Air Organization and is incorporated by reference in the DOT Hazmat Regulations in 49 CFR. The actual regulatory limit is 5 kilograms, gross weight. It is stated in section 2.3.2.1 of the Dangerous Goods Regulations.

How do you explain this:

from Alaska Airlines web site:

Ammunition—On Alaska Airlines flights 001-999 and flights 2000-2999, up to 50 lbs.(domestic) and 11 lbs. (international - where permitted) may be checked.

and this:

http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=ecfr&sid=dd8b86986c8a9a435f069a9375f2ea55&rgn=div8&view=text&node=49:2.1.1.3.11.1.25.5&idno=49

Title 49: Transportation
§ 175.10 Exceptions for passengers, crewmembers, and air operators.
(a) This subchapter does not apply to the following hazardous materials when carried by aircraft passengers or crewmembers provided the requirements of §§171.15 and 171.16 (see paragraph (c) of this section) and the requirements of this section are met:

(8) Small arms ammunition for personal use carried by a crewmember or passenger in checked baggage only, if securely packed in boxes or other packagings specifically designed to carry small amounts of ammunition. Ammunition clips and magazines must also be securely boxed. This paragraph does not apply to persons traveling under the provisions of 49 CFR 1544.219.

Also, the table in 49 CFR 172.101 lists the quantity limititation for cartridges, small arms in passenger aircraft/rail as 30 kgs. But that doesn't even apply to ammo carried onboard by passengers in checked baggage due to 49 CFR 175.10.

EOD Guy
June 15, 2011, 05:11 PM
Navy LT:

The ICAO/IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations (DGR) are primarily intended for international transport of dangerous goods by air. However, all US air carriers follow those regulations for all flights, including domestic. Alaska Airlines is an exception for domestic flights only because of it's customer base.

DOT has authorized the use of these regulations by air carriers within the US in lieu of 49CFR. That's why they are incorporated by reference into 49CFR and why DOT can enforce them. DOT has also placed state variations into the DGR for flights originating in, transiting, or landing in the US.

It is much easier and cheaper for the airlines to follow one set of regulations for hazardous materials (dangerous goods) shipments for both international and domestic flights than to have to deal with 2 different sets. The US state variations take care of DOT concerns that are not in the ICAO/IATA regulations.

Justin
June 15, 2011, 05:12 PM
How much ammo can one travel with from one state to another in an automobile, is there a limit on what can be carried

None that I'm aware of, and I've driven across state lines with literally thousands of rounds of ammunition in a vehicle when going to major 3 gun matches.

BobTheTomato
June 15, 2011, 05:25 PM
As others have said....odds are in some states you will be charged with a BS charge such as disorderly conduct or disturbing the peace. Your ammo will be held until everything is sorted out in a year or two. While it may not be illegal, in some states you will get hassled to death or detained for an amount of time.

BIGGBAY90
June 16, 2011, 09:29 PM
WOW

If you enjoyed reading about "How much ammo can one travel with" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!