Sling instead of stock?


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kayak-man
June 12, 2011, 03:51 PM
A while back, I remember reading about a method of shooting a PGO-Sub gun like an MP5 that involved using a sling/harness (Kind of like the tactical carry slings). If I remember correctly, the idea was that you would push the gun forward, and the sling would help stabalize the firearm and keep the distance that your holdign it away from you somewhat more consistant.

Does this really work, or is it just an internet/mall ninja myth?

If it does work...

I was thinking that this might have some application in the "Draco" AK pistols or maybe the PGO shotguns. I'M NOT SAYING THAT THIS IS BETTER THAN A FULL STOCK. I don't want this to turn into an argument about full stock firearms being better than PGO guns. It just seems like it may be a way to make a Draco a bit more usuable. I know I'd be tempted to try it if i ever got a Draco or one of the Serbu Super Shorty guns.

Does anyone have any experiance with this? Any legal pitfals with puttting a sling on a pistol?

Thanks in advance, and as always, if anything in my post doesn't make sense/is poorly articulated, feel free to ask for clarification.

Chris "the Kayak-Man" Johnson

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Ramone
June 12, 2011, 05:51 PM
one of the official, documented uses for the USGI lanyard for the 1911 was to stabilise it just in the fashion you describe.

It does, in fact, work.

Edited to add: I cannot find any actual mention of this on the intrawebz- my google-fu is weak today. But my Great War (WWI) USMC veteran Grandfather told me this was so, and did infact demonstrate on a few occasions.

Rail Driver
June 12, 2011, 05:58 PM
I have a sling stud and sling waiting to be mounted on my new mini draco as soon as I take delivery. I've used the 1911 lanyard, hi-power lanyard, and shotgun sling in the same fashion. It's very effective, especially when moving. It really adds a lot of stability to the firearm, and allows quicker follow up shots.

Ironclad
June 12, 2011, 06:07 PM
I'm trying to picture how a lanyard would help stabilize a 1911. Anybody got a picture or a good description?

Rail Driver
June 12, 2011, 06:15 PM
The lanyard would wrap around your upper arm. You take a firm grip on the pistol and press forward, towards the target. The pull of the sling vs. the push of your arm will help to stabilize the pistol and brings you back on target faster, as well as aiding in recoil control and accuracy.

Ramone
June 12, 2011, 06:15 PM
Lanyard loops overneck and left shoulder, and is adjusted so it pulls taut when the pistol is presented in firing position, leaving a sight bend in the right elbow (this is for a right handed shooter.

Just as in a standard two hand grip where the right hand pushes forward, and the left pulls back, the tension on the lanyard stabilises the weapon, especially when firing one handed ( which, as far as the old timers I know goes, is the only way to go - "it's a HANDgun, chowderhead, not a HANDSgun!).

One should also bear in mind that the 1911 was orginally seen as a calvary weapon, used on horseback, which would call for one handed firing.

Ironclad
June 12, 2011, 06:19 PM
Thanks. Thats a pretty nifty trick.

HorseSoldier
June 12, 2011, 06:25 PM
MP5Ks lack a butt stock at all. You can get some amount of control by pushing against a sling -- it's never going to be a sub-MOA sniper rifle, but using that technique pushes the range where you can make hits out to the close end of practical CQB ranges.

MachIVshooter
June 13, 2011, 03:47 AM
That's the whole purpose of the sling on the Kel-Tec PLR-16, and it works quite well.

No, there are no legal issues with it. A piece of nylon strapping does not constitute a stock and turn your handgun into an SBR.

henschman
June 13, 2011, 10:57 AM
Yeah, I think that method was described in the Tom Clancy book "Rainbow Six." I think he described it as the "British style" of shooting a submachine gun. It was strange because the SMGs they were using were 10mm MP-5s, which have stocks.

Even if it was unrealistic in that context, I'm sure Mr. Clancy heard about that technique from some real-world source. I wouldn't be surprised if he read it in some old SAS handbook or something from the era of the Sten/Sterling, or heard it related to him from some old operator. It might be a technique associated with the MAC-10 and M-11, or the original MP-5k, which didn't have a stock.

I have tried that method with a Cobray M-11. It provided more accuracy than using nothing at all.

kayak-man
June 13, 2011, 11:06 AM
Thanks guys!

No, there are no legal issues with it. A piece of nylon strapping does not constitute a stock and turn your handgun into an SBR.
Thats what I was thinking, but whenever I talk to people that are new to guns, I always tell them "If you just apply a little common sense to the gun laws, you'll end up in a federal prison." Figured I should probably follow my own advice.

Ramone, I hadn't heard that about the 1911. I'm thinking I might try something like that with my Hi-Point 45.

Thanks guys,

Chris "the Kayak-Man" Johnson

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