Help Me Convince My Dad To Load His HD Shotgun...


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Sulaco
June 13, 2011, 12:13 PM
So my parents had some interesting things happen last night.

My sister (adult) is staying with them while she is going through some physical therapy for torn ligaments in her ankle. She had looked outside for some reason and noticed that the dome light was on in her car. She thought it was strange because she's very particular and doesn't even turn that light on (and hasn't been driving much of late due to her injury). So she asked my dad (it was after dark) to go out and check on it. He noticed that the doors were locked and so he unlocked the car, got in, turned the light to the "door only" position it's normally in, locked the car and went inside.

He hardly got in the door good before their dog, a large and very territorial collie, went berserk. She was barking very loudly in that, "Something is wrong and you should let me out!" sort of bark, pacing, looking out the front windows of the house. By this time, my mom had gotten up and looked out one of the windows.

She saw a figure walking very quickly out of the driveway (this should not be happening in this area) and told my dad. By the time he got out, the guy was gone. Their neighbor is a close friend of mine (and a cop) and so they called him and he and my dad looked around a bit but didn't see anything.

They have some school kids in the area and so they just figured it was some of them messing about (Summer time and all of that) and went back in. Around 11pm that night (which was about 2hrs or so later), the doorbell rang. My sister said it wasn't just a quick, "ding", it was a solid, long ring. My dad again went out but whoever it was had taken off by the time he got out.

So they called the sheriff's dept. and a deputy came out and drove around for a while.

They never did hear anything else and the funny thing is, when the doorbell rang, the dog never budged. Very strange for her because she even barks at me some when I come over and she knows me very well (like I said, she's very territorial).

They later found out that one neighbor's dog also went nuts around the same time theirs did and they weren't sure why. And another neighbor did hear some noises in the woods on their property.

About a year or so ago, they had some vehicular break-ins, but nothing has happened since then.

So my dad has a nice (newer) Remington 870 he keeps in the house, but it isn't loaded. He pulled out some buckshot and put it nearby, but still wouldn't load it.

I did my best to convince him he might as well pick up a rock or a brick, but he wouldn't listen. Any ideas on how to convince him?

My parents are good people, live in a good area and don't have any enemies or even associate with people who would "mess with them" or anything like that.

They are going out of town this weekend and my wife and I are going to stay at their house to take care of things and the dog until they get back. I am not worried for us because if some idiot messes about while I am there, I have no qualms about putting him in the ground (and I am ALWAYS armed). But that's a week away so I am a bit concerned for my parent's safety.

Any serious advice is much appreciated!

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youngda9
June 13, 2011, 12:24 PM
Ask him what he would have done when he opened the door to some guy with bad intensions. Or if the persone kicked in the front door or came through the rear of the house in some way. Get the gears turning.

If that doesn't work then it'll take something bad to happen for him to change his ways. Sorry, but that's how most people are wired.

AirForceShooter
June 13, 2011, 12:30 PM
Your Dad is a grown up and over 21.

He'll do what he feels comfortable with.

AFS

M-Cameron
June 13, 2011, 12:38 PM
you can always tell him that people who dont load their weapons are at a higher rate of being killed by an intruder........

moonpie
June 13, 2011, 12:59 PM
get him a good shellholder and put it on his buttstock. keep the dog loaded

Vern Humphrey
June 13, 2011, 01:01 PM
So my dad has a nice (newer) Remington 870 he keeps in the house, but it isn't loaded. He pulled out some buckshot and put it nearby, but still wouldn't load it.

I did my best to convince him he might as well pick up a rock or a brick, but he wouldn't listen. Any ideas on how to convince him?
Suggest he do what I do -- cock the empty gun and put it on safe. Now the slide can be racked only by taking the gun off safe and pulling the trigger, or by pressing the slide lock.

Then load the magazine. It takes two distinct acts to put the gun in firing condition, but in an emergency that can be accomplished as you shoulder it.

ForumSurfer
June 13, 2011, 01:02 PM
Your Dad is a grown up and over 21.

He'll do what he feels comfortable with.

AFS ___

This.

I will ask a simple question with relatives if they ask my advice: "What good is that ___ if you don't keep it loaded and handy? Will you really have time to go fetch it and load it when the time comes?"

Other than that, it isn't my place to lecture them and I'm sure they would find it annoying.

I try not to harp on the subject or people (moms and pops included) will tune out your constant nagging. Maybe just an interjection at an oppoirtune moment like "That's why I keep my ___ loaded and handy, otherwise I'd just keep it in the safe since I'd never get to it in time." If they want a discussion, they will initiate it and then I'll talk more.

My dad is the "loaded 38 in the top (otherwise empty) dresser drawer" kind of guy. I personally feel that this is a poor choice and more of a liability than an asset, but it is his decision...not mine.

InkEd
June 13, 2011, 01:04 PM
It's a pump shotgun. Pretty safe to keep loaded. Load the tube, leave the chamber empty and use the safety for an extra precaution. It's slow to load an 870, I don't know what he would do in an emergency. Good luck.

rondog
June 13, 2011, 01:21 PM
Sorry, no advice here. I can't understand the thought process of having a gun and ammo, yet keeping it unloaded any more than I can understand having a territorial and protective dog that's going nuts and not letting it out to do its job. That dog knew that evil was present, let her go take care of business.

Sulaco
June 13, 2011, 01:32 PM
Thanks for the responses. The shellholder is probably a good idea and one I might look in to.

As to the post about "nagging" them, I don't, won't and haven't nagged them. But when something happens to put things in perspective, I want to make sure I approach it if the chance arrives (as it did). Don't know where you got the idea that I was "nagging" them.

Yeah, I agree about letting the dog out. Unfortunately my mom loves that dog like a child and would never put it in harm's way. Frustrating eh?

Gotta love em though!

ForumSurfer
June 13, 2011, 01:38 PM
I'm not saying you were nagging, it is just very easy to come across that way even though you are genuinely concerned for their safety.

I agree that now is the time to broach the subject.

harrygunner
June 13, 2011, 02:06 PM
You could tell him the Supreme Court thought it was a bad idea to have an unloaded gun. ;)

AlexanderA
June 13, 2011, 02:44 PM
The incidents that you describe don't amount to much (no damage to the car and no evidence of a break-in). Don't get paranoid. Have the gun ready but no need to load it unless the danger is more imminent. (You increase the risk of accident if it's loaded.)

Shawn Dodson
June 13, 2011, 03:55 PM
An unloaded defense gun is like trying to put on your seatbelt just before a crash or installing batteries in your smoke detector after a fire has started.

kva47
June 13, 2011, 04:13 PM
I think moonpie's on the right track. I'd get him one of those $5 nylon buttstock shell cuffs. See if you can convince him to keep that on the gun, and keep the gun cocked, empty, and on safe behind a coat in his closet. If he won't keep it loaded, at least he'll have shells ready to load instead of in a box somewhere.

Strykervet
June 13, 2011, 04:32 PM
It's a pump shotgun. Pretty safe to keep loaded. Load the tube, leave the chamber empty and use the safety for an extra precaution. It's slow to load an 870, I don't know what he would do in an emergency. Good luck.
Ditto. I leave rounds in the tube and the safety off --all I have to do is rack it when I pick it up, then put the safety on. Maybe I do it backwards from some out there, but I have my reasons.

Some time at the range with dad would be good family time and familiarization with the weapon.

I'm not that excited about leaving a loaded chamber on my HD weapon --I keep my conceal carry piece by my side 24/7 though, so I always have a loaded chamber in reach. Instead, I keep the shotgun or rifle with mag loaded, chamber empty, and safety off.

If he is worried about leaving it loaded and forgetting about the condition of the weapon, then perhaps a revolver would be a better choice. At the bare minimum, he should keep the tube loaded, or else trade it in on a baseball bat.

Another loaded shotgun safety trick is to load the tube and use red (or whatever) masking tape around the slide. Now he will know the shotgun is exactly as he left it --tube loaded, chamber empty.

Whatever he does, he should be ready to do it at 3am and half asleep. I champion having a GOOD alarm system, arming it at night, and using that as an early warning.

JustinJ
June 13, 2011, 05:32 PM
It sounds like your dad needs a proton pack. Just remember, tell them not to cross the streams if mom gets one too.

Sav .250
June 13, 2011, 05:43 PM
If he doesn`t want to keep a loaded gun at the ready......... save your breath.
Not all think a like............

USAF_Vet
June 13, 2011, 05:55 PM
I've had more than one 'bump in the night' type of scenarios where I've gone out armed. So far, I've not encountered anything. Usually the dog knocks something off the table, scares himself and they both start barking. Or the cat is outside and wants back in, or is killing a mole or something like that. The other night, I thought I heard a car door keep closing. My car is usually locked, but my wife refuses to and even leaves her key in the ignition.
"We live in the country, what could happen?" is usually her response.

I'm not overly concerned about 2 legged predators. We're far enough off the beaten path that anyone on the property would probably only be a neighbor. Still after dark, anything and anyone gets met with a bright light and a loaded gun. As far as four legged predators, I have chickens to keep after, so the occasional raccoon or coyote isn't unheard of.

At current count, I have three guns loaded or close enough to it in my house. 12 gauge in the gun cabinet on one end of the house, 9mm carbine and .45 pistol in the bedroom. The only one not loaded is the .45, which has two full mags in the case that can be loaded in about .5 seconds. To get really nit picky, I could have any gun in my house loaded in seconds, except for two, the muzzle loader and the Arisaka which I have no ammo for. Everything else can be hot and ready in virtually no time.

But, your dad is a grown man, entitled to his own opinions and actions. For many, a near miss (and I would classify the OP's post as a near miss) is all it takes to get over the taboo of keeping a loaded gun in the house. But a lot of people just aren't comfortable with it, never will be, and therefore will always be unprepared. Hopefully, your folks will be safe and never have to deal with anything ugly like a break in, or even petty theft from a car. You, and a lot of us here on THR, think otherwise. Hopefully you can convince him to be a bit more prepared, but don't badger the man over it.

Deltaboy
June 13, 2011, 06:28 PM
Prayers for your Dad he will need some time to change his mind.

hso
June 13, 2011, 06:35 PM
He's not thinking about a home invasion, just some thieves messing around the property so he doesn't see a need to load the gun.

It wouldn't matter anyway since he won't take it to the door nor would he likely shoot someone over a property crime.

Advise him that he can load it without chambering a round and that it would be perfectly safe that way for him to carry and still be able to chamber and fire if he found more need than he assumes.

Carl N. Brown
June 13, 2011, 06:42 PM
It took some experience to drill me into not panicking at the sight of a snake. If the dad in question has reservations about over reacting with a loaded gun in a panick situation, I can understand and respect that.

Status of my HD shotgun: Loaded magazine, hammer down on empty chamber, safety off. Everyone home warned to treat it as loaded.

Cosmoline
June 13, 2011, 06:51 PM
I would be more worried about his practice of answering the door and going outside when doorbells ring at odd hours. What on Earth would he have done if there *HAD* been a nogoodnick out there? What's the plan? That's a recipe for disaster, armed or not. You don't leave your castle when the Vikings are swimming in the moat.

Sulaco
June 13, 2011, 07:16 PM
I agree Cosmoline, my first thought when they told me he went outside when the doorbell rang was, "unarmed?" But yeah, that's just how it is I guess.

On the bright side, I got a chance to talk to him and my mom and they decided to keep the 870 with a full magazine, under the bed, easily accessible, but out of the way.

I mentioned the analogy that Shawn gave a few posts back and that seemed to get them thinking.

It was their idea which I felt good about. I've been very "tactful" in my approach, careful not to sound condescending or overbearing and it's obviously paid off. I hate that a "near miss" has caused them to think more about their security, but I am thankful nothing bad happened.

Now let's just pray that nothing bad does happen!

Thanks for the input guys, it helps to process this stuff and even though my parents are definitely not anti's, it's a similar situation and so good practice for all of us.

leadcounsel
June 13, 2011, 07:17 PM
What's the rationale for not keeping shells in the magazine at least?

Have him do a test, from full sleep mode to up, moving around, coherent, and loading the shells. I bet it takes a full 30 seconds for most people if the shells are in close proximity to the gun. Longer if you need to go to separate rooms or unlock the gun case.

So say it's 30 seconds of undistracted time. What can happen in 30 seconds or more, say minutes, when you are multitasking with calling 911, listening for noises, etc?

Cosmoline
June 13, 2011, 07:26 PM
Maybe he'd be better off with a Topper 88 and a shell holder mounted on it. He may be nervous about having to unload the tube on the pump.

Another idea--why not get some training lessons for him as a gift?

JustinJ
June 13, 2011, 07:37 PM
If and how one uses guns for HD is largely a value judgement based on perspective. Each person weighs the risk, likelihood of needing it and benefit differently. For some it's just not possible to convince keeping a loaded gun is worth while. Ask the reaons he won't, try to counter them if you have valid points and then accept it if he wont change his mind.

But personally it sounds like a haunting to me. I still say Proton Packs.

Toforo
June 13, 2011, 09:07 PM
His house, his gun, his ammo - his decision.

jim goose
June 13, 2011, 10:00 PM
I would definitely focus on him responding to incidents differently. Motion lights etc are the first thing I would recocmend to deter an encounter and give your dad time to respond accordingly. Loaded or not, you still have to know when to bring the gun out.

mizzlep
June 13, 2011, 10:29 PM
I agree with the motion lighting. Criminals don't like to be seen. You can also buy an alarm system for your house these days which don't have to be connected to any service. So, you just buy the intrusion detection equipment, etc, and you're alerted by the noise.

Another idea is a camera system, with signs stating you have as much.

Guns are always a good choice for home defense, but I believe keeping intruders out in the first place is always the best way to go.

ball3006
June 13, 2011, 10:45 PM
with my dad many years ago. I gave him a pistol for HD. Later I visited and asked if he shot the pistol? He said no. I asked where did he keep it and he replied the pistol was in the spare bedroom and the magazine was down in the basement in his file cabinet, ***? I asked what he would do if someone broke in and he replied, call 911. Never did change his mind....good luck with your dad.....chris3

LibShooter
June 13, 2011, 11:09 PM
You won't.

I'm assuming he's a smart guy. It's unlikely he doesn't know bad guys are out there. And it's unlikely he doesn't know it takes longer to load a shotgun than rack a slide. He just doesn't feel comfortable with a loaded gun nearby. I know the feeling. I was there until a couple of years ago. As far as I'll go now is an M1 Carbine by the bed with the mag inserted and the chamber empty. Nothing changed my mind. I just put the magazine in one night before going to bed and it's been there since.

Besides, it sounds like the collie will probably give him enough warning to get a couple of rounds in the Remington before he needs them. And get him some Snap Caps for Fathers' day and ask him to practice loading quickly. Tell him it will make you feel better.

mgmorden
June 14, 2011, 12:36 AM
His house, his gun, his ammo - his decision.

This. People do what they're comfortable doing. Keeping a loaded weapon is a CHOICE, and by definition if you want the freedom to make that choice to do so that means that others must have the choice to not do so. In the end, while I keep a loaded gun at home for protection, many, many people do not and they aren't dropping like flies.

The vast majority of them never have an incident. The reality is that the likelyhood that you'll need a self-defense gun is relatively slim (just a simple matter of statistics there). I just keep one because I don't don't want to play those odds, however slim. Others can choose to do differently.

Some people will ride motorcycles for example. Statistics show that riding a motorcycle is less safe than a car - accidents (even non-fault ones) are more common, and serious injuries are more common. That doesn't mean that a person that chooses to ride is being irresponsible - they just have chosen to accept a risk factor slightly higher than the norm, and that's ok.

klutchless
June 14, 2011, 05:39 AM
Does your mom know how to load the weapon ? Might be a good senario to convince your dad to keep it loaded . What if he's not home , or if he's hurt or fighting with an attacker always pays to have backup.If she hates guns all the better to have it loaded and ready.That way if she ever needs it all she has to do is take it off safe point and pull.

Shadow 7D
June 14, 2011, 05:56 AM
I would work on your mom, explain that after you dad is down, dead, or busy trying not to die as one or more 'bad guys' work him over to get to her and your sister, she should really learn how to use the gun

cause the only thing you dad is good for is buying her the time to get a shell or two in the tube.

Sulaco
June 14, 2011, 06:55 AM
Guys, I posted and said he decided to load it. My dad is ex-military (veteran) and knows his way around a gun. He's just never felt the need to keep one loaded around home. That's changed now due to a close call (original post) and thankfully, he's seen that it makes more sense to keep one loaded, just in case.

My mom doesn't hate guns and would have no problems using one to defend herself or her property.

I understand that keeping a gun loaded, or not, is a choice, but when something happens to show one how quickly things can deteriorate, it's pretty obvious that having an unloaded gun is pointless if you intend to use it for self defense.

Thanks for the input!

Ole Coot
June 14, 2011, 10:29 AM
I'm probably around his age and if he doesn't realize that bad things happen to good people I'm afraid you're wasting your time. We kinda get set in our ways. When we were younger we didn't have home invasions, crime in "good" areas and the old didn't bother to lock the doors bit. I've been exposed to a lot of violence and where I live is a very safe place but I am as aware as I was many years ago. He will do what he wants and the more he is pushed the more he will refuse. The dog sounds like a good alarm system. I would add more. I personally keep my defensive shotgun six in, chamber empty, safety off. Very easy to push the release, rack and ready. The sound alone to someone who knows anything about guns will recognize the sound. Demonstrate but remember you're still a kid and he knows better than you, don't push just make him aware of todays crime.

Sulaco
June 14, 2011, 10:44 AM
I just got word that my buddy, the cop (neighbor) caught them last night. It was two 13 year old kids ringing door bells, looking in windows, just generally goofing off. He grabbed one of them and tossed him in his vehicle (state issued, but not a patrol vehicle) and took him home, giving him the third degree. He let the kid's parents have it, too. He didn't catch the other one, but knowing him, these kids won't be messing about anytime soon.

Thanks again guys, problem solved!!

FIVETWOSEVEN
June 14, 2011, 11:26 AM
I've gone through the same thing twice and kinda sorta with my mom aswell.

When my dad started carrying, (he still doesn't all the time), He carried his Beretta 92FS completely unloaded and only 5 rounds in the 15 round magazine. I told him that he should load the magazine up to capacity but he said that he could stop someone with those five rounds. Now when he does carry, he has the mag in and filled up more but still unchambered.

My brother kept his 870 MM unloaded till I finally convinced him to load it after talking to him about it a few times and now its finally loaded.

My mom just carried chambered empty but now carries +1

vaherder
June 14, 2011, 12:17 PM
Your dad is doing what he is comfortable doing. If you dont like it sonny boy move out.

How much crime occurs in your zip code? Your dad is probably more aware of how safe or unsafe the neighborhood is then you are.

Your dad gets a pass based on his experience. You dont.

Now the sound of racking an empty 870 may or may not have scared two 13yo boys. Or maybe seeing him rack it may have had them both fouling their Big Bird briefs or their Lebron James boxers.

Problem is both were unarmed.

Chances are the punks heard the dog and boogeyed down the road. No harm and no foul.

He could load with rock salt and bacon grease. My suggestion is you raise your hand to volunteer to be the test subject.

moonpie
June 14, 2011, 12:40 PM
I just got word that my buddy, the cop (neighbor) caught them last night. It was two 13 year old kids ringing door bells, looking in windows, just generally goofing off. He grabbed one of them and tossed him in his vehicle (state issued, but not a patrol vehicle) and took him home, giving him the third degree. He let the kid's parents have it, too. He didn't catch the other one, but knowing him, these kids won't be messing about anytime soon.

Thanks again guys, problem solved!!
this is why i don't run out guns a blazin'

merlinfire
June 14, 2011, 12:47 PM
I think the most effective thing would be to politely pose the question to him "If that man had swung an ice-pick at you, what would you have done then?"

Sometimes we have scenarios in our head that, once we speak them out in the open to a critical audience, we see they don't hold so much water. Maybe you could convince him to at least keep the tube loaded, but not a round chambered?

mgmorden
June 14, 2011, 12:59 PM
Your dad is doing what he is comfortable doing. If you dont like it sonny boy move out.

I didn't see anything in his post that would indicate that he is living with them in the first place. As a matter of fact the overall tone (and reference to his sister staying with "them" rather than "us") suggests that this is explicitly not the case.

rellascout
June 14, 2011, 01:06 PM
Your Dad is a grown up and over 21.

He'll do what he feels comfortable with.



+2

Why do people feel the need to convince everyone that they need to defend themselves in a manner they are not comfortable with. :scrutiny:

merlinfire
June 14, 2011, 08:35 PM
Have him read this from Gunblast:

Full Article (http://www.gunblast.com/Reaching.htm)


Excerpt:
The punks that just entered your home rudely and uninvited are not going to wait for you to retrieve your pistol and load it. Both you and your weapon have to be ready, right now.

.......


Certainly the weapon has to be secured from unauthorized use, but if it is not loaded and ready to go, it is of no use to you. I cannot overstress the fact that it must be within reach. If you are lying on the couch in your underwear watching some silly television show, and your weapon is in the other room, you lose. If you are awakened suddenly from a deep sleep by the sound of glass breaking, and your weapon is in the gun safe, you lose. The cops are several minutes away. They will show up later to fill out paperwork and draw a chalk line around your body. Your only hope is in your weapon and your ability to immediately bring it to the fight.

CZguy
June 14, 2011, 08:49 PM
+2

Why do people feel the need to convince everyone that they need to defend themselves in a manner they are not comfortable with.


Let's bump that up to plus 3.

I don't see the need to make everyone think the same.

Taurus 66
June 14, 2011, 09:38 PM
It's a pump shotgun. Pretty safe to keep loaded. Load the tube, leave the chamber empty and use the safety for an extra precaution. It's slow to load an 870, I don't know what he would do in an emergency. Good luck.

You may have forgotten to include "attach a trigger lock" and "keep locked away in a safe". You know safe's are "safe" right? That's how they get that name. :rolleyes:

Sulaco: If your father is not keeping up with the fast changing times because he's still dead set in the old fashioned 1950's/1960's ways of thinking, what can you expect to say or do to make a difference? You're not exactly in a position to educate him, and I am 95% certain none of us here would make any difference. Just don't place your trust in anyone defending you "if" trouble should ever arrive. Carry your own sidearm and be prepared!

merlinfire
June 14, 2011, 10:33 PM
Let's bump that up to plus 3.

I don't see the need to make everyone think the same.

I wouldn't berate someone for thinking differently than me, but to say that there's no need to ever try to convince someone of your point of view is a bit.....well, why do we support advocacy groups?

Pat M
June 14, 2011, 10:40 PM
As Inked said: "It's a pump shotgun. Pretty safe to keep loaded. Load the tube, leave the chamber empty and use the safety for an extra precaution. It's slow to load an 870, I don't know what he would do in an emergency. Good luck."

This is what I do, along with an additional 5 rnds. on the stock. However, if I come home and an intruder is already in the house and been in my closet, this arrangement could prove to be problematic. I also would not be too quick to put someone in the ground over a property crime.

The Lone Haranguer
June 14, 2011, 10:45 PM
I could see a loaded magazine and the chamber empty, but completely unloaded is a little flabbergasting. But, no amount of nagging is going to convince him unless and until he wishes to.

CZguy
June 15, 2011, 12:48 AM
I wouldn't berate someone for thinking differently than me, but to say that there's no need to ever try to convince someone of your point of view is a bit.....well, why do we support advocacy groups?

I submit to you for your consideration, that there is a line between trying to convince someone (like in this case) keeping a gun loaded is a good idea when they don't want to. And then actively seeking ideas to help you convince them that your way of doing it is correct.

I think that it's fine to share your ideas on the correct way to do it, and then accept that it's their gun and house and they can do what they want.

bthr22
June 15, 2011, 01:00 AM
Maybe some people are just more comfortable due to certain events (the fact that your father is ex-military) and don't see someone knocking at the door in the night as a huge threat. And I'm saying this not knowing what he did in while in the military, but everyone perceives threats differently. I think it's awesome that he decided to keep his HD firearm loaded and at the ready.

I personally am much more wary of humans than I was a year ago. This is due to having spent much time camping in places where there are few people. When I got home and was in a different environment than I became used to, I began to realize that people are much more unpredictable than any wild, non-rabid animal. I can camp in a place where there is a high bear population and be totally comfortable, because I know what they want in my campsite, food. And can take precautions to prevent them from coming near me. So now I always have a pistol, magazine loaded, chamber empty in a safe under my bed. There are small children in the house, which makes a small safe a necessity, God forbid one of them found it if I just kept it stuck under my mattress. But it is always at the ready, even though I, and my parents will most likely never have to use it. But it's there, and I have earned a distinguished expert qualification in pistol from the NRA, so I don't have to worry about whether I would be able to hit my intended target.

usmarine0352_2005
June 15, 2011, 02:31 AM
.


Defense Lawyer: "Was your gun cocked and loaded?"



Rooster Cogburn: "It won't fire if it ain't cocked and loaded."


.

bhk
June 15, 2011, 01:10 PM
A lot of people have had different life experiences than maybe you have. I am in my 60s, never had my home invaded, never been seriously threatened on the streets, and don't know any civilian folks that have had to use a gun in self defense. I still carry a gun and keep a loaded one in the house, but I can understand how many folks with life experiences like mine would feel no need to keep a loaded gun around. The actual, statisitcal likelihood of him ever using a gun in self defense is exceedingly tiny. I am sure he knows that. Some of us keep a loaded gun just in case we are victims of the very unlikely, but others won't. Each to his one.

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