.22lr conversion practice benefit


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RTR_RTR
June 14, 2011, 01:12 AM
Is there much practice benefit to putting .22lr's out of an identical rig to your larger caliber pistols, relative to say, loading random snap caps and dry firing? The AA conversion for glock 19 looks like a lot of fun to me, but for the price to catch up practice-wise it would take 4 bricks of .22

What say ye?

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Nushif
June 14, 2011, 01:23 AM
I'm gonna totally ignore the practice and learning aspect here and throw in another variable ... Money.
Imagine the money you can save.
And here's another variable ... FUN!
Imagine the fun you can have .... 1k rounds per range session for slightly more than 50 rounds of 9mm.

If my guns of choice had an option like that I'd never have learned how to reload.

RTR_RTR
June 14, 2011, 01:28 AM
The money is definitely a factor. The conversion obviously saves money long run, but as a poor grad student, the front load money is more tangibly significant. There's also the bonus of how much shooting can be done in a sitting with .22's vs 9mm, which is kind of important when number of trips to the range is limited, but time at the range (when there's time to go in the first place) isn't so limited.

Thanks for the reply! Trying to chew this one threw the skull

Nushif
June 14, 2011, 01:35 AM
I feel ya. I'm a poor student myself and the only reason I reload is because they don't make a .22 upper for a PT911. Or a Norinco. Or a Beretta. Or any of my guns.
That .22 upper would save you a lot of money....

9mmepiphany
June 14, 2011, 03:26 AM
Is there much practice benefit to putting .22lr's out of an identical rig to your larger caliber pistols, relative to say, loading random snap caps and dry firing? The AA conversion for glock 19 looks like a lot of fun to me, but for the price to catch up practice-wise it would take 4 bricks of .22

What say ye?
Yes there is. There is a huge benifit to the .22lr conversion kits as they let you learn the trigger and get actual feedback to see if you are doing everything right.

Not to take away from dry firing, because Dry Fire is actually more important than live fire...serious shooters I know usually dry fire 7 rounds for each live round in practice...but there are things you'll learn about your shooting with a .22lr that you'll never see in either dryfire or livefire. It is about confirmation of technique (grip, sight alignment, trigger control) while removing the recoil of a CF round.

PO2Hammer
June 14, 2011, 05:08 AM
My .22lr conversion has been a huge help in mastering the DA/SA transition in my Sig.
I also shoot 25 yard bullseye better if I practice with the conversion first.
Your problem might be finding one for the G-19, rare as hen's teeth right now.

ken grant
June 14, 2011, 08:59 AM
I love the kits. A lot of practice on the cheap.

AA for G 19/23
AA for G 21
AA for 1911
Ciener for 1911
Ciener for AR 15
Military 261 for AR 15

I have all of the above and use them often. The only problems I have are with the AA Kits, they are very ammo picky. All the others seem to work well with most HV ammo.
The 261 works even with Std. ammo.

You will find that follow-through is very important when shooting .22's as bullet speed is lower in some the guns

BullfrogKen
June 14, 2011, 09:07 AM
I have a lot of fun with a .22 conversion unit for my 1911.


Yes, as 9mmepiphany points out there are benefits that you don't get from dry fire alone. Spending a long afternoon learning to master the trigger without battling recoil fatigue is a big benefit. Spending an afternoon doing something fun when you can't find centerfire ammunition is nice. Spending an afternoon shooting 500 rounds without needing to sit behind a loading bench for 5 hours first is fun.


It's fun.

MaterDei
June 14, 2011, 09:18 AM
Frankly, I'm not a serious enough shooter to do much dry firing. I don't deny that it makes one a better shooter if done right, I just don't enjoy doing it.

I have a Kimber 22 conversion kit that I use and enjoy shooting it a lot.

loadedround
June 14, 2011, 09:32 AM
I have a Ciener Conversion kit for my 1911 and use it quite frequently. It is the Platinum Model which is their target model having ajustable sights similar to my Colt Gold Cup. It is more accurate than I'm am and it's a great way to practice inexpensively and work on your trigger control. It's also great when you sometimes get too lazy to reload. :)

RTR_RTR
June 14, 2011, 09:58 AM
Thank you all for your help, guess it's time to save!

451 Detonics
June 14, 2011, 12:53 PM
I bought the Twisted Industries conversion for my Kel-Tec PF-9 and have been very pleased with the purchase. It allows me to shoot cheap ammo with the same trigger and sights at a very low ammo cost. About 1200 rounds of 22 versus factory 9mm and the unit has paid for itself. Many complain of the PF-9's recoil but in .22 even some who is very recoil sensitive would have no problem shooting 500 rounds in a range session with the conversion.

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