How concealed is concealed?


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nigelcorn
July 6, 2011, 01:42 PM
I am fairly new to carrying concealed, so I am very cautious about printing. Because of that, I have been carrying in a smart carry. While I am happy with how well it conceals, I worry that the draw is so slow and requires two hands so that if I ever needed my weapon, it would be difficult to get to in time.

So, I am thinking about getting something like the crossbreed supertuck (or one of the many knock-offs that use the same design). I am looking for something IWB for my XD9sc.

My question is, how concealed will I be with this? I usually wear shorts and a t-shirt, or jeans and a t-shirt. I live in Vegas, so throwing a vest or something over it isn't really an option I am interested in. I am about 5'11" and 175 lbs or so, so probably average body type. Is it going to be obvious that there is a big bulge under my t-shirt with this type of holster/gun setup? I don't wear shirts that are skin-tight, but I also don't wear shirts that hang down to my knees.

Thanks for the help, it is a lot of money to spend for something I can't try out first, and I am really hesitant to go around with an obvious bulge that sticks out--of my t-shirt, anyway ;).

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Sam1911
July 6, 2011, 01:49 PM
That's funny... there's an almost identical thread going on today: http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?p=7424030

An excerpt from my post over there:

The good news, as bigfatdave points out, is that how much you THINK you're printing is usually much more than how much you are REALLY printing. And how much you are really printing is generally negated by the fact that most people are oblivious (wouldn't notice a gold-plated Desert Eagle open carried on your belt), are not terribly curious or imaginative when they do notice that you are "lumpy" on the hip, and that it really doesn't matter whether you are "printing" or not in most states as, even in states where concealment is required there isn't generally an "effectiveness of concealment" standard you have to meet.

As a practical matter, though, I find that "tuckable" holsters seem to conceal better for me than standard IWB holsters with an un-tucked shirt. Tucking the shirt in around the gun makes the shirt blouse out more above the waistline which tends to mask the grip better than an un-tucked shirt which tends to hang straight and drape over the gun.


Being "cautious about printing" -- i.e. fidgeting with your gun and tugging at your clothes to make sure you're covered -- will get you noticed a lot more than an odd bulge here or there.

I can't imagine too many common situations where a gun in a smart-carry or thunderwear type holster would be of any use at all. None of the scenarios I've trained for would give me the time to drop trousers or go fishing for a gun carried that deeply. I know there are very specific scenarios where that kind of concealment is necessary, but none of them seem to apply to me as an average joe citizen going about my daily business.

chhodge69
July 6, 2011, 01:52 PM
You have to dress for concealment and style may suffer. With a tee-shirt as a cover you aren't going to find any type of IWB carry that simply WILL-NOT print. My solution to this problem is to wear my gun IWB at 3:00 with a light tee shirt tucked in and a light polo un-tucked or short-sleeve button down worn open and un-tucked.

NMBrian
July 6, 2011, 01:54 PM
Button up shirts are your best friend.

ny32182
July 6, 2011, 01:59 PM
I think most people are paranoid about it when they first start. This will gradually go away... currently, a spandex muscle shirt about two sizes too small is about the only thing I would consider inadequate as a cover garment. No one will notice a "bulge", and they wouldn't care if they did.

bigfatdave
July 6, 2011, 02:19 PM
you don't need the silly gunderwear, you might want to switch to a looser T-Shirt over an undershirt or a camp shirt over an undershirt.

If you have pants that are sized properly, a good belt* and a shirt that will cover your belt-line reliably, you can conceal IWB with a CB ST type holster. Adding an undershirt will increase comfort.
I posted pix a while back of my first SuperTuck:
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=439381
One of those pictures is with the shirt pulled tight across the gun.
I occasionally wear a T-Shirt over the ST, the elather on your skin can get irritating over hours, but adding a thin cotton undershirt makes the rig comfortable for cross-country driving or sweaty outdoor work.

And I have two more SuperTucks and another (better design) magazine carrier from that company since ... they're making good stuff!

*good belt ... order a purpose-made gunbelt, CB makes an OK one, BeltMan makes a superb one, various companies make an "instructor belt" and there are lots of leather belt makers out there. Your wal-mart or Sears belt will need to be cinched uncomfortably tight to keep your gun from sagging outwards. But don't worry, you'll never need to buy a belt again. (need is not want, of course ... I have one bullhide BeltMan, one cowhide CrossBreed, and a horsehide from BeltMan I bought for myself as a reward for being less of a fattie - the BeltMan belts get worn all the time and the CB belt is an awesome work belt for hanging my radio/keys/tools/etc off of)

catnphx
July 6, 2011, 09:53 PM
nigelcorn - I live in Phoenix so I feel your pain on the heat issue and how to conceal with the minimal clothing we wear in this type of weather. I'm always wearing shorts and a t-shirt or shorts and a button down shirt. Printing is something to consider but not to the point that you hide the gun so far away that you don't have access to it when you need it (which is usually during an emergency situation). I've got three carry guns that I switch around based on weather, activity, clothing, etc...:


M&P 9c in a Crossbreed Supertuck IWB
Kahr CW9 in a Kholster Crescent IWB
S&W J-frame .357 in a Galco Kingtuk IWB

All three work great and conceal very well. Most people will never know that you are carrying and the ones that do are probably carrying themselves and looking for it. Regarding you wearing "skin tight shorts" well first thanks for that visual. :rolleyes: With most IWB holsters, you will need a slightly extra sized pant to carry the gun. For example, if you were a 33" waist then you'll want a 34" waist. Finally, like a couple of others stated, get a damn good belt; very important.

Good luck!!

Zundfolge
July 7, 2011, 12:08 AM
I should probably just add this to my sig line, but the first (and possibly most important) component of concealment is mindset.

If one walks around like they're confident that they're not printing, they will likely get away with printing better than someone without that confidence that is NOT printing.

Note that I have a decade of 24/7/365 carry ... so I've had plenty of time to develop that confidence.


Anyway, as to the OP ... yes a CBST with a good belt and pants an inch or two larger waist size and you can pack an XD sub-compact under a t-shirt (unless its tight). Darker colors would work better than white. Patterns even better.

Of course in a city like Vegas one can easily get away with Hawaiian shirts (which are the absolute best cover garment ever made)

JTQ
July 7, 2011, 09:12 AM
Thanks for the help, it is a lot of money to spend for something I can't try out first, and I am really hesitant to go around with an obvious bulge that sticks out--of my t-shirt, anyway

Tucker offers a 90 return if it's just not for you.
http://rlcompanyusa.stores.yahoo.net/index.html

High Noon has a 30 day return policy
http://www.highnoonholsters.com/index.html

IlikeSA
July 7, 2011, 01:37 PM
I stopped caring about printing a long time ago, and now just throw a t-shirt or a loose button down or polo over it. No one really notices, and it is perfectly legal here, so why care? The only places I am cautious about it is at church, and that's more of a respect thing than anything else. As I mentioned, and others mentioned before me, confidence is important. You aren't doing anything illegal, and there is nothing to worry about. After a while, it will grow on you and you will feel something is missing without it.

If you do really care though, get a good IWB holster and start wearing untucked shirts, particularly dark colored or random printed shirts. Stay away from stripes and light colors, unless they are really loose.

4thPointOfContact
July 7, 2011, 02:12 PM
If you can't see it when standing on the other side of me from it...... then I'm happy.
98-degrees and 110% humidity aren't conductive to sports jackets, 'shoot me first' vests, or much of anything else.

ForumSurfer
July 7, 2011, 02:23 PM
I stopped caring about printing a long time ago, and now just throw a t-shirt or a loose button down or polo over it. No one really notices, and it is perfectly legal here, so why care?

I'll second that. I assumed for a couple of years that concealed meant 100% concealed and I'd be outted somehow or someone would notice me carrying. I found it to be untrue once I experimented with my concealment method. After carrying fully concealed, partially and not even remotely concealed...I came to the conclusion that people in my area don't notice. Even open carry gets fewer responses than I had imagined.

I now go on a "best effort" basis on what is comfortable for me. I don't care if I print a little.

Of course it all depends on your local laws and your local social climate. You'll never know until you try.

RedAlert
July 7, 2011, 05:06 PM
Then too, our society is so accustomed to cell phone holsters of one kind or another on a man's belt, they would figure the "printing" is from a phone first.

Zundfolge
July 7, 2011, 05:54 PM
Then too, our society is so accustomed to cell phone holsters of one kind or another on a man's belt, they would figure the "printing" is from a phone first.
I actually had a woman bump into my gun at Walmart ... she said "I hope I didn't damage your phone".

ForumSurfer
July 7, 2011, 05:56 PM
I actually had a woman bump into my gun at Walmart ... she said "I hope I didn't damage your phone".

Got the same comment after an unsolicited (but appreciated) hug.

nigelcorn
July 7, 2011, 08:12 PM
Then too, our society is so accustomed to cell phone holsters of one kind or another on a man's belt, they would figure the "printing" is from a phone first.

That may be true, but I think people with cell phone holsters and bat-belts look ridiculous, so I try to avoid that whenever possible.

I guess you are all right; I have read many times that it just takes some getting used to and people won't notice anyway. I live in Vegas, I don't think it is a particularly anti-gun area (at least I haven't noticed it). Seems like it is kind of like learning how to swim- best just to jump in and go for it.

Thanks for all the replies.

hvychev77
July 7, 2011, 10:30 PM
i'm not a big fan of cell phones accessorizing my outfit either, however, most people in wal mart or sam's club or wherever you go aren't going to be focused on who's packing and who isn't. if i'm in the grocery store, and someone prints a little bit, i don't pay any attention to it, but i feel like "o.k., i got someone on my side if the SHTF." ......i do my best to be concealed, but if i do print, i'm not worried about it at all because i'm licensed and i know my legal rights........just my 2 cents....hvychev77

Michael_2112
July 11, 2011, 06:14 PM
In some regards it matters as to what your state laws are regarding concealed and open carry and "printing". In PA you can open carry... So overall I'm not all that concerned about it.

I generally carry OWB (sometimes with a t shirt as the cover garment) and I'm covered up well enough that no one seems to notice. Keep in mind though I most often carry a LCP or G26 which are fairly small to begin with.

It's all mindset really, and not overthinking and constantly adjusting it. The bulge can be anything from an insulin pump to PDA... And most people are oblivious.

This is just one of those things that get easier over time. I really think everyone goes through the exact same when they first start "packing".

Stay safe and regards,

Mike

The Lone Haranguer
July 13, 2011, 09:03 PM
I don't wear shirts that are skin-tight, but I also don't wear shirts that hang down to my knees.
I think we can find something in between. ;) T-shirts are a very poor cover garment for any kind of belt holstered gun, IME. I like the long-tailed, square-cut-hemmed shirts often known as a "camp shirt" myself. You will want at least an A-shirt under the shirt, between the gun and your skin, though.

Tirod
August 19, 2011, 12:27 PM
When you have to balance job security and life security, it's best to consider all the carry alternatives rather than focus on the advice of those who don't need or even care to. They aren't forced to accommodate deep carry to prevent job loss and a difficult rehiring process, which should be an indicator of just exactly what they know about it.

When your work requirements force you to wear a tucked in uniform shirt, be in close proximity with other workers who will see you bending, stretching, lifting, and reaching tall shelves, or work in close proximity with retail customers, printing becomes a major issue. "Lumps" might be cell phones, as those could be equally proscribed by workplace rules - but not in IWB holsters, or underarm carry. Unless you are known to be wearing an insulin pump, don't count on casual observers mistaking a lump for some other innocuous device. It's a lump that doesn't really belong.

Lots of casual IWB carriers who just "go about their business" should count their blessings, because in an active retail environment, nothing they enjoy is allowed - even carry. Most companies don't allow weapons in the workplace, and there are plenty of cases we fight as First Amendment users to restore their rights and employment. I find it naive at best to suggest anyone just do whatever they like in the obvious face of corporate rules requiring their employees be disarmed, or be unemployed.

That's exactly why deep carry holsters exist, and the pooh-poohing of those who do everything but carry open isn't the best source of recommendation. They aren't able to do anything to prevent your employer putting you on the street. The first rule is to protect YOURSELF, and it's up to you to balance your security needs with your workplace rules. It's hard to support a spouse, family, or make money for your own needs and desires when somebody else's advice gets you burned.

If you consider the risk of actually being endangered with lethal force at the job, and the risk of losing that job, and determine that trading off speed of access will allow you to keep working there, then that's your choice. Most of us aren't confronted in our workplace with gunmen intent with killing us - despite all the notorious news. Most often, if you are, it's a robbery, do what they ask (up to a point) and give them the cash. It's pretty lame to acknowledge you weren't aware of them in your environment and made no effort to counteract their presence - but many do.

There's really not that much difference in carrying IWB or smartcarry - it's basically a method of keeping the butt of the gun just below the belt line. If you wear pants and a belt that tightly, you would have to make exactly the same change as IWB, size your pants for the rig. Training - same - you would have to move any garment out of the way, in this case, pushing the belt away to reach the butt is just part of the routine. You wear a smartcarry holster over the shirt tail, it's not in the way. With practice, it should come down to a fraction of a second difference. At that point, accuracy of fire becomes much more important.

Then you can let management decide whether to continue your employment, which they likely won't. But you will at least be alive - or more likely so, which is the intended result, and perhaps some coworkers might thank you for saving their lives. At least if you are working now, you are more employable, and can move to a job that is less restrictive of your rights - rather than out on the street with a "man with a gun" reputation that keeps you unemployed.

It's up to the individual to assess all the risks in their environment, and second hand recommendations should be considered in exactly that light. A well rounded and realistic appreciation of ALL the factors will have a better application than an off the cuff response that "all the big boys do it this way."

They worked their way to a privileged position, not all of the rest of us have those rights, and it's pretty short sighted to think we do.

Carter
August 19, 2011, 07:58 PM
Dark, especially black, button up shirts work very well for me. They hide my shoulder holster very well and hide my iwb holster very well. They also allow very fast access to either one of my holster options. The black color helps break up shapes and makes it hard to distinguish anything is there except clothing.

Since my state allows open carry I'm not worried about my gun flashing if I do some extreme movement and don't bother with deep concealment. I want fast access and comfort. Depending on the outfit I'll sometimes open carry with a baggy shirt and no one seems to notice.

Its really not that big of a deal, unless your state makes it a crime to show your gun.

Edit: Above statements for when not at work.

When at work deep concealment of some sort or leave it in the car.

Tirod
August 20, 2011, 07:23 AM
Since my state allows open carry I'm not worried about my gun flashing if I do some extreme movement

It's not about the state much anymore, it's about employer rules. Flash a customer in a retail mall job and see just how lenient the typical corporate HR department views working armed. It's the same crowd up there that proudly announces gifts to organizations that many of us would never contribute to.

Aside from the much more immediately lethal risk of our fellow citizens, the corporate structure is the next worst enemy in gun rights. They already have policies against even storing weapons in vehicles out in parking lots - and fire people who are discovered with a gun in the trunk, unloaded, put there to shoot after work.

Take that same arrogant and highly restrictive attitude to the sales floor, and flash a gun in sight of a district or regional manager. I suggest you be prepared to be escorted by the police from the building. Good luck even being able to get your lunch bag from the refrigerator or desk.

I have no problem with those who exercise the societal privilege of carry, open or otherwise, but the existence of unemployment is there, and it's ludicrous to ignore it. When workplace rules prohibit the carry of ANY gun, it's the wrong thing to recommend someone just go IWB and let the coworkers get over it. Some of those coworkers are already very much antagonisitic - either religion, lifestyle, or politics are likely flashpoints in conversations best left unspoken - but some make it very clear even so.

If your workplace is known to be a diverse culture, and corporate unlikely to view firearms in a positive light, there's no leniency to be expected if it's discovered you didn't bother to carry concealed. It's even worse to take advice that it's ok to be sloppy about it.

Apparently all too many have the pollyanna view that YOU'RE FIRED isn't in your manager's vocabulary. Having more states than ever with CCW and open carry is great - but inside a company owned building, things have actually gotten WORSE over the last 20 years, which is why deep carry methods have become even more important.

snooperman
August 20, 2011, 08:42 AM
If it bulges a little, who cares ? It is not a problem for me as I use IWB holster and cover with a polo and that is it. I like cross draw and it is quick and easy with my Glock 19 or the Colt Magnum Carry.

Carter
August 20, 2011, 12:25 PM
It's not about the state much anymore, it's about employer rules. Flash a customer in a retail mall job and see just how lenient the typical corporate HR department views working armed. It's the same crowd up there that proudly announces gifts to organizations that many of us would never contribute to.

I wasn't talking about on the job. I've never carried at a job because it was never allowed. If I did I'd take the same approach I did at church. Shirt tucked it with my supertuck.

And my opinion wasn't arrogant, it was just anti-paranoid about being "made". The OP didn't ask about work, it asked about everyday carry.

two gun charlie
August 20, 2011, 05:28 PM
I live a life where I have to conceal carry due to the fact that if your fire-arm is spotted it makes you a target , firstly if you are going for this option you have to know and accept that you will probably never be quicker on the draw than your assailant, you carry for the situation where you will see a situation develop and you will draw pre-empt , otherwise you will duck behind something and hope you don't get shot before you have a chance to draw. Another fact of life will be that you will have to settle for the smaller pistols designed for concealed carry , larger pistols just won't do. and that is my humble opinion.

The Lone Haranguer
August 20, 2011, 09:24 PM
Carrying becomes easier if you think in terms of "unobtrusive to a casual glance" rather than "not even a hint." :)

Tirod
August 21, 2011, 10:27 AM
There is obviously two sides to the coin - but it's not Texas Open Carry everywhere you go yet.

Casual flashing on the street is your call, what you get away with in your environment that works for you, fine. For others - it could be the WRONG decision, and it IS arrogant to assume for someone else just how careless they should be (not calling out anyone specific.) As a mindset, it makes the circumstances of how one individual deals with it the gold standard. Well, if you are an out of state, CCW licensed , and find yourself in CA, good luck with casual flashing. The first anecdotal story I heard on that was a neighboring state's LEO academy student being discovered in a traffic stop and losing their seat in the classroom as a result. Violating the law - however stupid and wrong that law may be - will not excuse anyone and a punishment will be handed down.

At the very least, ignoring the people around you and not taking into account that their views on firearms may be misinformed, malicious, and even proactively harmful means deliberately ignoring a risk - opening you to a political attack thru the administrative structure of the workplace.

If anyone is blind to that risk, well documented in the news and lawsuits, is it portraying a lack of general knowledge, or a blind spot that continues to fuel resentment in others? The "I can get away with it" mindset is risk tolerant, and it may also manifest itself in a lack of sensitivity toward others. Going thru the day with a "Screw you, I'm golden" attitude doesn't sound like a comfortable Condition Orange mood. More like a superbrite White and bulletproof denial of risk at all.

Isn't that what tactical instructors caution us to avoid?

There's also the reverse problem - coworker's who are aware you might carry, and don't mind at all. In fact, when confronted by a robber in a public place, excitedly waving their gun in the face of his targets, they confidently blurt out, "Hey YOU have a gun, why aren't YOU doing something about this guy?" A simple robbery for cash is now escalated to an armed showdown, with the BG already aware. NO method of carry can make up for THAT tactical disaster, you can't draw fast enough.

I thought the point of carry was to prevent other people making lifethreatening actions against you - but it's ok for your acquaintances to ignorantly gamble with your life? Really?

I think we should quit excusing poor carry practices and flashing a gun for what it is, a desire to be seen as powerful and impressive - at the expense of security and loss of an edge in the fight. What is getting pushed is exactly the opposite of the "grey man" philosophy, a concept where the gun carrier is actively showing off their "concealed" hardware and overtly being "the Man" to support their ego.

I see it as a flawed concept, and I hope someone doesn't find it literally indefensible. It is exactly the reason the military no longer flies in uniform.

Spartan Gladiator
August 21, 2011, 10:53 AM
And my opinion wasn't arrogant, it was just anti-paranoid about being "made". The OP didn't ask about work, it asked about everyday carry.

I didnt get the feeling Tirod was saying your opinion was arrogant, I understood it as the corporations and employers restrictiveness and arrogance limit your ability to carry period.

Carter I am curious since my state doesnt allow open carry(go figure that in texas) when you do wear openly do you get weird stares or do people get nervous? I like the wearing black but I would be dead of heat stroke down here before I could use my weapon.

Geckgo
August 21, 2011, 11:29 AM
Noting a couple things here,

If you are doing ANYTHING that is against company policy, then you run the risk of being fired, no matter how well you try to "hide" it.

I don't think the OP was asking about the best way to blatently disregard the policymakers at his workplace, he can correct me if I'm wrong.

This is an internet forum, not a defense course. Opinions are taken with a grain of salt, and I'm sure the op is not going to be steered toward something that doesn't work for him. How many of us buy junk guns anyways after repeatedly being warned not to? People make their own decisions, but like to hear input from those who have experience and have thought about other things.

That's all I'm gonna say about that, back on topic. A little print in most situations is going to be completely unnoticed. It's easy to scan over yourself and see what you are looking for, but a passing glance from someone else leaves a little more room for error. Talk to anyone with a nice paintjob on their car about the 20/20 rule, or buy a "fake thumb" magic kit and see for yourself how little people notice when something "off" is sticking right in their face and they still can't see it.

Tirod pointed out some good situations where deep concealment might be more important, if you are in one of those situations, then guess what? Draw time is going to suffer. I always liked ankle rigs and pocket guns for them types of situations. With Deep concealment, you give up a lot more to hide something and you will be limited on gun, clothing, calibre, and holster rig. Just how it goes.

Pict
August 21, 2011, 12:11 PM
As to concealment in hot climes, Hawaiian shirts work very well. The usually flowery print helps to confuse the eye. I go one size larger than I am, and all is well. (I'm in Arizona.)

Carter
August 21, 2011, 12:30 PM
Okay let me clarify my original statement cause either I badly worded it for its being misinterpreted. I said I wasn't bothered by my gun flashing from some extreme movement, not that I'm okay with random flashing. Your gun is going to show at some point in time, its unavoidable. I'm not going to worry about it and check my shirt every 5 seconds. I do, however, try to keep it from showing by choosing an appropriate outfit.

I have never, and will never support random/intentional flashing in public. Lets use some common sense. An unintentional "flash" has happened to anyone if you have kids, don't walk like a zombie, and getting in or out of a car. Depending on where you're at though, a flash is just inexcusable. Like work, fancy occasions, etc. Never carried at work, don't really plan to.

Deep concealment, as in hard to get too, is fine if you choose, but its not for me.

Carter I am curious since my state doesnt allow open carry(go figure that in texas) when you do wear openly do you get weird stares or do people get nervous? I like the wearing black but I would be dead of heat stroke down here before I could use my weapon.

When I open carry its not with my gun just hanging out blatantly visible. I generally wear a baggy shirt so I can make my gun disappear if need be, and I only open carry when I know I'm not going to be going to certain places (such as a town center, malls, etc). I've never gotten stares or been asked to leave. Like others have said earlier in the thread, no one really seems to notice. People are oblivious. I still try to make it less eye catching. My holster is black, my gun is black, my shirt is usually black. It kind of disappears to most people. I used to be very paranoid about carrying. I'd check all the time to make sure my gun wasn't showing and wouldn't dare open carry. But after a few months you start to realize no one is going to look away from their cell phone or some hotty walking by to look at you.

As far as not wearing black cause of the heat, there are other options. Any color helps more than a plain white shirt. White shirts, especially t-shirts, tend to have some type of see through effect. My tattoos on my upper arm show through t-shirts and they're relatively small. A gun will definitely show through.

If your state doesn't allow concealed carry I could understand choosing a more deep concealment. My state allows open carry so its not something I'm overly concerned about (from a legal stand point), but still prefer and attempt to keep my gun concealed. When I go to South Carolina (doesn't allow open carry) it stays hidden and will not be seen. Beach winds don't help though!


As far as a at work, if your business doesn't allow it I wouldn't suggest it. Like Tirod has said, business are usually unforgiving.

Spartan Gladiator
August 21, 2011, 08:17 PM
But after a few months you start to realize no one is going to look away from their cell phone or some hotty walking by to look at you.
I liked that response it took me a few minutes to stop laughing; I think you’re on to something. I will just walk next to a Hottie and can probably carry an RPG without getting noticed. Gotta love human nature and our attention span, must be why pick pockets make a living.

Tirod
August 22, 2011, 12:07 PM
"Not even a hint" spares the company any issues - with no knowledge beforehand, they aren't liable, which is their primary concern, avoiding a lawsuit.

"Not even a hint" spares the concealed carrier any tactical loss of surprise when none of your coworkers can possibly "out" you in a bad situation.

'Not even a hint" means no one who works with you can use it in office politics.

"Not even a hint" means others less discreet are cover for you when things do go bad - their reaction attracts attention, diverting it from you. Don't misconstrue that - it was their choice, and they made it. No sense not using it if it happens, and you could resolve the situation to a more positive conclusion.

"Not even a hint" means just that, and it has specific advantages that more casual carry can't take advantage of.

If some want to be the known CCW guy with a gun, that's not to say it doesn't have some benefit. With the right perceptions about who that person is, it works. "This guy might have a gun" does act as a deterrent, and a bad guy assessing his risk may decide to avoid the situation for easier pickings. On the other hand, "This smaller person I don't respect anyway might have a gun" may just incite a confrontation because the reward is greater for the same risk.

If you can't pull off the first, you better avoid the second. "Not even a hint" actually lowers your risk, because there is less to gain. If you aren't worth it, then a predator more likely moves on.

Each individual has to assess their risks, and blanket, one size fits all answers are no better than insisting a size 6 maturing daughter could carry a Blackhawk .44 just like you do. Few would honestly make that mistake. And it should be the same about carry methods, don't insist one way should fit all situations.

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