IMR 4895/H4895, Can I Combine A Little?


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Dapperdan
July 7, 2011, 05:32 AM
Hey folks, been loading for many years. I've been loading 223, my manuals call for the same charge for either of these powders, 24.0 grs. with 50 gr. bullets, so I've been buying whichever of these two powders I can find. Velocity difference in only 7 fps. So, I am left with less than 1/4 can of H4895, now back to using IMR, my question is, can I mix in this small amount of H4895 with the new jug of IMR? I'm an old fool, but not foolish enough to mix powders for rifles with powders for pistols, etc. I know in some calibers, there is a considerable difference in charge weights with these two powders, but not so for 223 Remington. Some people use other powders than this for 223, but this load is dead nuts accurate with Hornady V-Max bullets out of a Remington 700, groups you can cover with a dime at 100 yds. So, what say the reload gurus, safe, or not? Thank you for your time and have a good day!

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FROGO207
July 7, 2011, 06:25 AM
I personally would not do it. I will not even mix a small amount of different lots of the same propellant with each other. I will just use up the amount I can for that last round or two with a trickler and scale. Just make a smaller run using the partial can and be done with it or you could save it for a different use. I am sure there will be others that will disagree but the manufacturers say not to for a reason, and that would be safety.:cool: If it was safe you would not be asking this question IMO. YMMV

JimKirk
July 7, 2011, 07:40 AM
Why not use it until it runs out then switch?
I see no problems with getting a few grains of such close powders mixed together ... I would not want to mix half and half. If you are running max loads then I would think a lot more about it.

Jimmy K

USSR
July 7, 2011, 08:00 AM
I would not do it.

Don

steve4102
July 7, 2011, 08:23 AM
The only thing that is the same between these two powders is the name. They are completely different, made by two different companies on two different continents. Do not mix them together!

oneounceload
July 7, 2011, 08:24 AM
I will not even mix a small amount of different lots of the same propellant with each other

Unless you are a BR shooter looking for that .001 accuracy level, there is NO danger in doing this aspect at all

So, I am left with less than 1/4 can of H4895, now back to using IMR, my question is, can I mix in this small amount of H4895 with the new jug of IMR

Well the amounts would make me possibly consider it IF you're talking about 2-4oz of one being mixed into 8# of the other - that would dilute anything, and since they are almost identical, shouldn't be a big deal......Remember, powder makers blend powders all the time to get a desired result

Gadzooks Mike
July 7, 2011, 08:36 AM
I'd say drop a dime to Hodgdon and see what they say.

MtnCreek
July 7, 2011, 08:45 AM
They don't burn at the same rate. I'm sure you could mix them and use your IMR load w/o any damage, but why would you want to do this? There is Zero chance that you'll get the two powders evenly blended, so there will be inconsistencies between cartridges.

bigedp51
July 7, 2011, 09:04 AM
Dapperdan

The last thing I would be doing is asking faceless strangers on the internet if its safe to mix powders. So the real question is who is going to be pulling the trigger "YOU" or the faceless strangers.

H4895 is made in Australia by ADI and owned by a French company and goes by the name of AR2206H in Australia.

IMR-4895 is made in Quebec Canada and is owned by General Dynamics weapons division.

They are two distinctly different powders made by two different companies, on two different continents and only have a close burning rate when they are burned by themselves.

In closing Dapperdan I would never mix Australian Fosters beer with Canadian Molson, it might just leave a bitter taste in your mouth.

ArchAngelCD
July 7, 2011, 11:16 PM
As you see everyone thinks isn't a bad idea including me. I'm curious as to why you would want to mix them in the first place? Like already said, just use the H4895 until it's gone and then move on to the IMR4895.

jcwit
July 8, 2011, 12:34 AM
They don't burn at the same rate. I'm sure you could mix them and use your IMR load w/o any damage, but why would you want to do this? There is Zero chance that you'll get the two powders evenly blended, so there will be inconsistencies between cartridges.


Depends on what chart one looks at. They are extremely close to being the same. I would use as much up as possible the mix the small amount left over, seriously doubt it would anything.

Powderman
July 8, 2011, 01:02 AM
If you check any reloading manual, you will find this printed as one of the steps in reloading safety:

"NEVER mix different powders" or words to that effect.

There is a reason for that warning.

I don't care about the economics of the move--your safety and health are worth far more than that.

Do not mix powders.

EVER.

jcwit
July 8, 2011, 04:04 AM
If you check any reloading manual, you will find this printed as one of the steps in reloading safety:

"NEVER mix different powders" or words to that effect.

There is a reason for that warning.

I don't care about the economics of the move--your safety and health are worth far more than that.

Do not mix powders.

EVER.


If you pay complete attention to all the cautions in reloading manuals you would never get any reloading done! The companies are protecting themselves from litigation.

Don't believe it, start reading the cautionary lables on food and household products.

A smidgen of IMR 4895 in a full bottle of H4895 mixed together is going to be of no consequense. Remember these powders have similar burn rates and similar powder drops per the receipies.

Its like 5 drops of whiskey in a full glass of coke and calling it a mixed drink.

jacksgd
July 8, 2011, 06:04 AM
I have to ask Why you would even want to do it?

The most powder you would be losing would be 23.9 grn. or about 7 cents worth.

Gadzooks Mike
July 8, 2011, 08:43 AM
As you see everyone thinks isn't a bad idea including me.


Well, not exactly EVERYONE. Anyway, I just wrote to Hodgdon and I'll post their answer when I get it.

Asherdan
July 8, 2011, 09:37 AM
Why screw around so much with the mixing and the emails and such? You have a load for each and there's little difference. Load up all the H4198 and label it, whatever you have left that's less than 24 grains, go fertilize a lemon tree. Shoot 'em up when you get around to it.

You get the same end result without all the dinking around, you have ammo and your extra powder's used up. Why jump through extra hoops?

So, no. I wouldn't mix the two. It's like buying a headache, who needs it?

MtnCreek
July 8, 2011, 09:42 AM
If Hodgdon says it's OK to mix, I would be shocked! (see post 13).

Dapperdan
July 8, 2011, 10:10 AM
Thanks for the kind replies, people. Right now, I'm leaning towards NO. Although I'm using IMR now, I'll eventually be back around to H, so I think I'll save it and add to the next jug of H, or use it for fertilizer. It's just that I'm a cheapo, but I can't see risking a disaster for a few cents worth of powder. I WILL be surprised if Hodgden says it's OK, also! Thanks again for your time, just wanted to get a other opinions, which I knew I could get here. Good day, all.

jcwit
July 8, 2011, 10:23 AM
If Hodgdon says it's OK to mix, I would be shocked! (see post 13).


And why? To make their legal dept happy is why.

Remember, small paks of Planters Peanuts state on the back as a cautionary note that they contain PEANUTS!

You are in no danger of a disaster.

bigedp51
July 8, 2011, 12:01 PM
MtnCreek
If Hodgdon says it's OK to mix, I would be shocked! (see post 13).


jcwit
And why? To make their legal dept happy is why.

Remember, small paks of Planters Peanuts state on the back as a cautionary note that they contain PEANUTS!

You are in no danger of a disaster.

I love these forums, anyone with a computer and two fingers can write anything they want, the problem is these same people do not have any pressure measuring equipment and are just guessing.

This is like the advice people give out in forums that it is OK to grease and lube your ammo and it wont hurt anything.

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o254/bigedp51/oil-lube.jpg

Bisquick and Aunt Jemima pancake mix are similar but I don't make biscuits using Aunt Jemima pancake mix. :banghead:

On the Hogdons burn rate chart:
87. Hodgdon H4895
88. VihtaVuori N530
89. IMR, Co IMR 4895

Gee I wonder why we don't mix all three powder together, I know lets change the name of VihtaVuori N530 to V4895 and start mixing.

Popcorn Turkey stuffing recipe
"Mix" one cup of popcorn with 3 cups of bread crums.
1 cup chopped onion
1 cup chopped celery
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
2 whole eggs, beaten
Bake at 400 degrees F until turkey is golden brown or popcorn blows a$$ off turkey. :eek:

http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o254/bigedp51/4895.jpg

243winxb
July 8, 2011, 12:20 PM
The only thing that is the same between these two powders is the name. They are completely different, made by two different companies on two different continents. Do not mix them together!

Mal H
July 8, 2011, 12:40 PM
Dapperdan - you haven't said as far as I can tell - how big are these cans/jugs you're talking about? Actually, 1/4th of a can of any normal size is an appreciable amount of powder.

Even so, I tend to agree with oneounceload and jcwit with regard to those two powders. Sometimes folks seem to envision an atomic bomb when things aren't done precisely according to Hoyle.

If you do mix them (and I'd wait until you have a lot less than 1/4 of the mystery can), you still have to follow the age-old reloading rule to back off 10% and work up again. That alone should discourage you from actually doing it. Although, on the other hand, you should do the back-off routine when you change from one powder to the other anyway.

243winxb
July 8, 2011, 12:45 PM
Do this test. Set up your powder measure for IMR, get an average reading of weight. With the same setting on the measure, change powders. When dropping the powders by voliume, what is the weight difference between brands??? :D

Gadzooks Mike
July 8, 2011, 01:05 PM
bigedp51 - not sure what you're getting at with the chart - PSI does not equal CUP? You're right. Using this formula PSI= -17,902 + 1.516 x CUP, 38,300CUP is approximately 40,160PSI.

Blowing up turkeys with popcorn and greasing your ammo? Real High Road, that.

243winxb - The answer to your question is the weight difference would be zero. The VMD for IMR4895 is .0728. THe VMD for H4895 is .0728.

jcwit is 100% correct - If you pay complete attention to all the cautions in reloading manuals you would never get any reloading done!

oneounceload
July 8, 2011, 01:49 PM
Nice chart biged - except we weren't talking about mixing on a 1:1 ratio

You never mixed different gasolines in your car tank or can for the lawnmower? Never mixed a few tablespoons of leftover cereal of one type from one box to the new box?

Looks like a whole lot of folks are so worried about not a lot, especially not even wanting to blend the same type of powder.

We are not talking about blending Bullseye with IMR 7828, and a few grains of one type blended and diluted with a whole big jug of another is not going to create an A bomb

243winxb
July 8, 2011, 02:02 PM
The answer to your question is the weight difference would be zero. The VMD for IMR4895 is .0728. THe VMD for H4895 is .0728.

I see you have done your homework, good job. :)

USSR
July 8, 2011, 02:22 PM
While I would not do it personally, in no way do I believe it would be unsafe in the case of IMR4895 and H4895 with any load that was not on the bleeding edge pressure-wise. The thing I would like to comment on is, the references to two powders being near each other on the various burn rate charts as a reason that it is acceptable to combine them. What a burn rate chart does NOT tell you is, the relative difference in their burn rates. In other words, two powders next to each on a burn rate chart could have a greater degree of burn rate difference than two other powders somewhere else on the chart that have several other powders listed between them. So, for me, I simply stick to the rule of only combining cannister-grade powders that are exactly the same. Just MHO.

Don

Gadzooks Mike
July 8, 2011, 02:27 PM
I see you have done your homework, good job


My response to that is not printable here.

PO2Hammer
July 8, 2011, 02:34 PM
You are in no danger of a disaster.

You must be a ballistician or chemical engineer?

Just because somebody mixed powders once and got away with it, doesn't mean the next person will.

Risk/reward. Is the reward that great that it's worth the risk?

DC Plumber
July 8, 2011, 07:48 PM
Holy cow people!

First off, why in the world would anyone want to mix anything that has a label that specifically says not to do it?

Secondly, ***...................................is this guy phishing? And stop giving him options. Dude! Read the label. I'm not going to give any other reasons other than, the manufacture says not to do it. How is that not good enough?

Sorry, not trying to be hard on anyone, but it is rather black and white!

jcwit
July 8, 2011, 08:41 PM
Holy cow people!

First off, why in the world would anyone want to mix anything that has a label that specifically says not to do it?

Secondly, ***...................................is this guy phishing? And stop giving him options. Dude! Read the label. I'm not going to give any other reasons other than, the manufacture says not to do it. How is that not good enough?

Sorry, not trying to be hard on anyone, but it is rather black and white!

Holy Cow Man!

Do you really believe every label you read? Do you shoot reloads in your handguns, better reread your owners manuals. Most state not to shoot reloads.

Seriously folks we are talking about two powders here with very similar burn rates and folks check your reloading manuals, the one I just checked gave a starting load difference of only 4 tenths of a grain.

Lets start using some common sense. A small amount, maybe 100 grains, of either one added to a full lb. of the other powder will be of no consequense.

For those of you so concerned about the safety of such small amounts being a danger, have you ever had an extra beer before heading home or have you ever drove over 55 where the speed limit was posted as 55 mph? Be honest now!

ArchAngelCD
July 8, 2011, 10:55 PM
What I can't believe is, why can't everyone just give their opinion without arguing with the opinion of someone else. Some of the posts are getting personal and that's just not The High Road! Sarcasm and sniping shouldn't have a place here. Everyone's information is valid but should be evaluated for what it is, "free information from a stranger on a forum."

What I personally would do or not do with those powders shouldn't matter because you should never recommend someone else do something the manufacturer tells them not to do. Anyone has the right to take chances for themselves but should never tell someone else to take a chance. IMHO of course... :uhoh:

Mal H
July 8, 2011, 11:03 PM
ArchAngelCD - didn't you just do in your second paragraph what you said folks shouldn't do in your first paragraph?

Nonetheless, you are partially correct in that there should be no rancor in these types of discussions. Give an opinion, perhaps argue against another's opinion if you wish (that's always been acceptable), but keep it civil.

ArchAngelCD
July 8, 2011, 11:09 PM
I don't think I made my post personal and if I did it was unintentional. I was trying to get across a general concept in the second paragraph but not aimed at anyone in particular. It was more an "all of us" including me thing...

Powderman
July 8, 2011, 11:14 PM
Do you really believe every label you read? Do you shoot reloads in your handguns, better reread your owners manuals. Most state not to shoot reloads.


Actually, I do tend to believe the labels, and listen to them--especially when using a propellant that can become unpredictable and possible explosive if the burning properties are altered.

The benefit of such a practice is quite small. You save a few pennies--that's all.

The potential dangers of such a practice are quite high. You have a serious risk of injury or death if things go wrong.

My observation is that this is an example of false economy. Why take the chance?

Quoheleth
July 8, 2011, 11:16 PM
The analogy of mixing two gasolines or two cereals is flawed. A better analogy is mixing gasoline and diesel. Both burn and turn engines and produce similar results, but they burn differently. Try mixing them sometime...you won't get far or long. (Although I do know one or two car enthusiasts who buy one and only one brand of gasoline and refuse to mix fuels to eliminate chemistry inconsistencies between commpany's forumulae)

One argument is "it's legalese." Maybe...or, maybe it's safety! Why take the risk? We have the 4 rules of gun safety all of which are redundant just in case one rule is broken accidentally. But, that doesn't excuse someone running around with a finger on the trigger or waving a gun at people saying, "But I'm keeping the other three rules!"

One rule of reloading is don't mix powders. Don't do it. Load a short batch with the remnant of the one powder and start fresh with the new powder. Be smart. An grain of caution is worth a few ounces of powder.

Q

jcwit
July 8, 2011, 11:52 PM
I still fail to see the problem with a few graines of H4895 mixed in with a lb. of IMR 4895.

Actually, I do tend to believe the labels, and listen to them

So do you shoot reloads in a new handgun?

Have you ever went over the speed limit?

Have you ever crossed the yellow line?

PO2Hammer
July 9, 2011, 12:25 AM
So do you shoot reloads in a new handgun?

Have you ever went over the speed limit?

Have you ever crossed the yellow line?


Yes

Yes

Yes

Do I mix powders to save $1 or ten minutes work? No

Mal H
July 9, 2011, 12:44 AM
I still fail to see the problem with a few graines of H4895 mixed in with a lb. of IMR 4895.
In all fairness, jcwit, though I still agree with you in principle, the OP isn't talking about mixing "a few grains", he is talking about mixing a minimum of approximately 1700 grains. I say minimum, because he still hasn't returned to clarify the size of the cans and jugs he is talking about. I'm guessing they are one pounders.

I don't think it should be done in the quantity he is contemplating. A few grains, no problem; 1/4 lb or more - problem.

steve4102
July 9, 2011, 01:42 AM
Question for the OP. Would you consider mixing two powders of similar burn rates if the names were completely different? Oh. lets say H-335 and Ramshot TAC. They are both ball/spherical powders and are very close to each other on "some" burn charts. If the argument that "close is good enough" then the actual name should mean nothing, correct.

If these two completely different powders that you love so much had completely different names like H-4895 and IMR 2012 would you consider mixing them together?

jcwit
July 9, 2011, 03:40 AM
In all fairness, jcwit, though I still agree with you in principle, the OP isn't talking about mixing "a few grains", he is talking about mixing a minimum of approximately 1700 grains. I say minimum, because he still hasn't returned to clarify the size of the cans and jugs he is talking about. I'm guessing they are one pounders.

I don't think it should be done in the quantity he is contemplating. A few grains, no problem; 1/4 lb or more - problem.

Missed that about the quantity, then yes it would not be a good idea at all. we then would be talking about a large enough quantity to say NO, Do Not mix.

Question for the OP. Would you consider mixing two powders of similar burn rates if the names were completely different? Oh. lets say H-335 and Ramshot TAC. They are both ball/spherical powders and are very close to each other on "some" burn charts. If the argument that "close is good enough" then the actual name should mean nothing, correct.

If these two completely different powders that you love so much had completely different names like H-4895 and IMR 2012 would you consider mixing them together?]

Regarding this scenario usually NO, but there are powders under different numbers packaged under different company names that are identical its 3:30 in the morning and am not going to take the time to research this out now, but I do know this for a fact. If this were the case I find it would be no different than mixing whats left over from an empty jug and adding it to the next jug with a different lot number. Very small amount added to a much larger amount.

DC Plumber
July 9, 2011, 10:18 AM
Do I believe every label I read? No, but ones that deal with flammable or explosives in a confined space, like a cartridge, yes. I'm not a scientist and cannot predict what those chemicals will do when mixed.

Now, motor oil, sure I've put Mobil 1 in my lawn mower and topped it off with conventional oil. But I've never put a drop of gasoline in my diesel engines because diluting diesel with a solvent like gasoline WILL damage an injection pump.

It may be untrue, but when I've read about how quickly pressures can climb with high end loads, I pay attention.

Do I shoot reloads in my guns? Yes, all of them, but not anyone elses reloads. Sorry to come off as a jerk before, but geez, I'd bet most guys on this board can't calculate the pressure curve of a load when the powder amount is increased by a given percentage. It's not a linear curve.

Did the OP just ask the question to get the rest of us arguing about mixing powders?

steve4102
July 9, 2011, 10:49 AM
Regarding this scenario usually NO, but there are powders under different numbers packaged under different company names that are identical its 3:30 in the morning and am not going to take the time to research this out now, but I do know this for a fact. If this were the case I find it would be no different than mixing whats left over from an empty jug and adding it to the next jug with a different lot number. Very small amount added to a much larger amount.

Correct, there are many powders under different names that are indeed the same. 760 and 414, 231 and HP-38 to name a few. Then there is the ADI/Hodgdon equivalents as ADI make a lot of Hodgdon powders. H-4895 is made by ADI and is equivalent to AR-2206H. Mix em you want to, but IMR-4895 is not made by ADI it is made in Canada and is a Completely different powder than H-4895.

As they are not the same powders your scenario above is incorrect.

I'll ask it again, knowing that they are two different powders, would you still mix them together if their names were not similar???

jcwit
July 9, 2011, 12:17 PM
I'll ask it again, knowing that they are two different powders, would you still mix them together if their names were not similar???

No.

But in this case the names ARE SIMILAR, the burn rates ARE SIMILAR, the load recipes ARE VERY SIMILAR, so my answer to the question in this thread is yes. Shur would.

Would I mix Bullseye with H4831? Don't think so.

It may be untrue, but when I've read about how quickly pressures can climb with high end loads, I pay attention.



I load for accuracvy which usually means staying away from the high end loads, moderate loads usually bring better accuracy and of course more comfort while shooting. No need to punish my body while killing paper. Arthur in the wrists doesn't like high end loads either.

Eb1
July 9, 2011, 01:05 PM
That's a BIG FAT NO!


I wouldn't run duplex loads unless I was shooting some old trap door or sharps with a guy that has a long grey beard that has been doing it for years. And I bet he would be using black powder and not smokeless powder.

jcwit
July 9, 2011, 01:12 PM
Ya know, this discussion has gone on and on, it seem you who are trying to convince me are going to have as much luck as I have of convincing you.

So being as this is The High Road I suggest we go our seperate ways and do as we wish. With 50 years of reloading experience, and Lord knows how many 100's of thousands of reloaded rounds behind me I'm confident with what I do. May the rest of you have as many years of enjoyment, and safe reloading as I have had.

Eb1
July 9, 2011, 01:19 PM
Okay. Load up 30 grains of IMR 4895 with a 170 grain bullet in 30-30.
Then load up 30 rains H4895 with the same 170 grain bullet in 30-30.

Shoot them over a Chrony, and tell me if they are the same. See if you get the same velocity. Check case stretch, etc.
That is the only way I can tell you to try, but I don't condone mixing it. Duplex loads are not a good idea. They can be unpredictable with smokeless. I know guys who shoot duplex loads with black powder when the use long barrels. Most duplex loads are loaded with black powder is all I am saying.

jcwit
July 9, 2011, 01:41 PM
Okay. Load up 30 grains of IMR 4895 with a 170 grain bullet in 30-30.
Then load up 30 rains H4895 with the same 170 grain bullet in 30-30.

Shoot them over a Chrony, and tell me if they are the same. See if you get the same velocity. Check case stretch, etc.
That is the only way I can tell you to try, but I don't condone mixing it. Duplex loads are not a good idea. They can be unpredictable with smokeless. I know guys who shoot duplex loads with black powder when the use long barrels. Most duplex loads are loaded with black powder is all I am saying.
__________________


Whatever, see post #46

Eb1
July 9, 2011, 02:41 PM
Okay, but I wasn't directing my post at you, jcwit. Go your own way, but you cannot deny that the majority of duplex loaders are black powder loads. So with your 50 years experience you should know that.

Keep your bad habits to yourself, and not put them out for others to try, and possibly hurt themselves. What you mention goes against all rules of reloading.

So yeah. Whatever with your bad habits you have practiced for 50 years.

jcwit
July 9, 2011, 03:21 PM
OK, You brought me out again. No one here was talking about duplex loads, you Eb1 brought that up. Duplex loads are measured amounts of 2 powders. Key work there is "measured", and yes it usually done with black powder.

The OP was referring to mixing 1/4 lb of powder with a full lb of a very similar powder powder. Its true I missed the 1/4 lb quanity, a was thinking of the left over amount of a few grains say maybe 100 grains max, "note my earlier post to that amount", to be added to the fresh 1 lb container of powder.

That would yield 1 grain of one powder to 70 grains of the other powder, with an avg. load for a 30/06 being in the neighborhood of 50 grains of either IMR4895 or H4895 this means there would not even be a full grain of the left over powder in said load. This comes out to less than 20 individual grains (pieces) of powder per charge to approx 2500 to 3000 individual grains (pieces) of the other powder.

Eb1 perhaps you should do some research before calling someone out and insinuating they have bad habits or know not of what they speak.

Eb1, if you have a problem with that so be it.

Asherdan
July 9, 2011, 03:35 PM
This is assuming you can do an absolutely consistent blend. That's a big assumption. Pouring them in a can and doing the cha-cha doesn't assure you of squat.

I'm sticking with my "why borrow a headache" answer.

I also don't get why having a small quantity of known, tested and satisfactory reloads on hand to use up the H4895 is better than playing around with this mix it up question.

Someone: explain to me why using that final 1/4 pound up to make some perfectly acceptable cartridges and then moving on to loading the IMR version isn't the simplest, safest and most time and resource saving answer.

Eb1
July 9, 2011, 05:13 PM
I have done my research, and it all leads to not blend smokeless powder. Be it 1 grain / 50 grains. It is not recommended. That is all I am saying, and if you mix two different powders, jcwit. It becomes a duplex load. Duplex mean "two" different powders. I apologize if that is what it takes to keep trouble down, but mixing powder is not recommended.
Either load the rest, or use it for fertilizer.

A lot of newbies come here for information instead of doing their research by reading up on hand loading. I just don't want anyone getting the wrong idea. What you do on your time and your practices is fine by me. Just don't pass it on as the norm.

Doug b
July 9, 2011, 05:26 PM
Eb1 is absolutely correct this is were a lot of newbs start there research.

jcwit
July 9, 2011, 05:46 PM
It becomes a duplex load. Duplex mean "two" different powders.

Duplex does indicate 2 of whatever one wishes it to pertain to.

Duplex Load indicates a measured amount of one powder and a measured amound of the second powder, not a mixture of any unknown amount of 2 powders.

Now then refer back to post #46

And may common sense prevail.

Eb1
July 10, 2011, 12:13 AM
Let's hope your nonsense doesn't.

steve4102
July 10, 2011, 12:22 AM
Back to you DapperDan,

Would you have posted this question if these two powders had completely different names?

Would you consider mixing two powders of different manufacturers with similar load data and burn rate knowing they were two completely different powders?

Did you post this question because you assumed that same name means same powder?

Mal H
July 10, 2011, 12:24 AM
Enough of this.

Dapperdan has returned to THR recently, but failed to answer a few questions here, so I guess he's got his answer.

Closed.

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