Budget pistol/carbine combo?


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Owlnmole
July 10, 2011, 11:41 AM
From the Old West cowboy with his Colt revolver and Winchester rifle, likely in .44-40, to today's auto pistols pistol caliber carbines, it still makes sense for a shooter on a budget to have a handgun and a long gun in the same caliber.

The pair can be used for self-defense, plinking and hunting small or medium game, though, of course, the choice of caliber will favor one use over another. Since we are talking about a shooter on a budget, that implies commonly-available and inexpensive ammunition, so either either rimfire or a centerfire caliber cheap to buy or reload: .22LR, .22MAG, .38SP/.357MAG, .44SP/44MAG, .45LC, 9mm, .45 ACP all come to mind, though there may be others as well.

Yes, I know that there are pros and cons to pistol caliber carbines, and revolver cartridges benefit more from the increased barrel length than auto pistol cartridges. Please humor me and stick to pistol caliber combos.

To keep us firmly in the budget category, let's say under $600 for the combo, guns only, new or used. Be prepared to back up your price with an online source if anyone calls BS. That's about $3 per work day--coffee and donuts--for a year, including $150 for shipping and dealer fees and some ammo.

What would be your choice?

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USAF_Vet
July 10, 2011, 11:47 AM
A combo pistol/ carbine for $600 or less?

The only one I can think of is the Hi Point 4595/ JHP 45. Carbine and pistol combo, at retail new, right around $450-$500, to include extra mags and ammo.

Hi Point JHP .45ACP, bought mine new for $169.99+tax.
Hi Point 4595 carbine, last I saw were about $300 new. Don't have one but I know it's slightly more expensive than my 995, which cost me $250.

Edit to add: The 9mm or .40 carbine/ pistol would be ok also.

I'd like to see a Hi Point carbine to match their .380

memphisjim
July 10, 2011, 11:51 AM
Ruger 10/22 And ruger 22 pistol or revolver

buck460XVR
July 10, 2011, 11:57 AM
I own handgun/carbine combos in both .357 and .44, even tho the practical applications disappeared with transportation across long distances by horseback. About the same time a quality combo could be had for $600.

Owlnmole
July 10, 2011, 12:17 PM
Just a reminder that the $600 price point was for new or used guns. So, for example, I have seen new Kel Tec SUB 2000s at around $300 recently, and CDNN has police trade-in S&W 5906s for $299 that can take the same magazines. A little digging ought turn up a solid used double-action revolver and matching caliber Marlin lever gun for under $600 in most parts of USA. If you want to go old school, even new, Impact Guns has the basic Uberti Peacemaker replica for $359 and CDNN has the H&R 45LC single-shot carbine for $229.

moonpie
July 10, 2011, 12:41 PM
Just a reminder that the $600 price point was for new or used guns. So, for example, I have seen new Kel Tec SUB 2000s at around $300 recently, and CDNN has police trade-in S&W 5906s for $299 that can take the same magazines. A little digging ought turn up a solid used double-action revolver and matching caliber Marlin lever gun for under $600 in most parts of USA. If you want to go old school, even new, Impact Guns has the basic Uberti Peacemaker replica for $359 and CDNN has the H&R 45LC single-shot carbine for $229.
when you add shipping and dealer transfer charges you done busted your own budget.

MachIVshooter
July 10, 2011, 01:05 PM
it still makes sense for a shooter on a budget to have a handgun and a long gun in the same caliber.

It really doesn't. It was rifle type and ammunition availability in the frontier days. Your choice for a rifle was basically a carbine or a single-shot. For many, the faster handling and increased firepower of the carbine trumped the greater power of the rolling and falling block rifles. Well, since the carbines were all pretty much limited to handgun-type cartrdiges anyway, why wouldn't you get it in the same chambering as your side arm? And suppose the frontiersman opted for the sharps in .50-90 or one of the MANY other similar cartridges; Good chance the little general store in towns he may reside near or pass through would have to order it in, which could take weeks. They were likely to have the popular carbine/handgun ammo, though.

Today, very different story. We have ultra light, very compact carbines chambered in rifle cartridges, and availability of ammo is a non-issue. So why would one limit him/herself to the dismal power and range of the pistol caliber carbine when, for no added weight or inconvenience, he can carry a real rifle?

If you want one for plinking, by all means. You don't need to justify it. But it's a vastly different world than the days of the romanticized old west, and there's no real advantage to ammunition compatibility today. There are good reasons to own a pistol caliber carbine, but that's just not really one of them in the here and now.

That said, some cartridges (like .44 mag) really do shine with the longer barrel, approaching (and sometimes exceeding) the energy levels of smaller rifle cartridges. I have a Marlin 94 .44 mag. I didn't buy it to be a companion for my 629, but because it is a compact and fast handling rifle with a pretty good thump down range.

Owlnmole
July 10, 2011, 01:10 PM
when you add shipping and dealer transfer charges you done busted your own budget.

Which is why I left the other $150 for shipping and fees and some ammo....

WaltonS
July 10, 2011, 01:14 PM
Want a real budget combo? Beretta u22 neos: $230@BudsGunShop. Carbine conversion kit: $250 from Beretta's site.
Bud's has free shipping within the continental 48, and it looks like if you go for ground shipping, Beretta does too. That puts you at $500, if you can find an FFL that'll do the transfer for $20 or less. That gives you $100 to spend on optics, spare mags, or ammo.

Owlnmole
July 10, 2011, 01:24 PM
It really doesn't. It was rifle type and ammunition availability in the frontier days. Your choice for a rifle was basically a carbine or a single-shot. For many, the faster handling and increased firepower of the carbine trumped the greater power of the rolling and falling block rifles. Well, since the carbines were all pretty much limited to handgun-type cartrdiges anyway, why wouldn't you get it in the same chambering as your side arm? And suppose the frontiersman opted for the sharps in .50-90 or one of the MANY other similar cartridges; Good chance the little general store in towns he may reside near or pass through would have to order it in, which could take weeks. They were likely to have the popular carbine/handgun ammo, though.

Today, very different story. We have ultra light, very compact carbines chambered in rifle cartridges, and availability of ammo is a non-issue. So why would one limit him/herself to the dismal power and range of the pistol caliber carbine when, for no added weight or inconvenience, he can carry a real rifle?

If you want one for plinking, by all means. You don't need to justify it. But it's a vastly different world than the days of the romanticized old west, and there's no real advantage to ammunition compatibility today. There are good reasons to own a pistol caliber carbine, but that's just not really one of them in the here and now.

That said, some cartridges (like .44 mag) really do shine with the longer barrel, approaching (and sometimes exceeding) the energy levels of smaller rifle cartridges. I have a Marlin 94 .44 mag. I didn't buy it to be a companion for my 629, but because it is a compact and fast handling rifle with a pretty good thump down range.
All good points, but there is still the budget factor to consider, especially in terms of the ammunition. Buying just one pistol caliber in bulk is going to save money, the same goes for reloading...say just one Lee Loader in .357, one size of brass and bullet, one type of powder.

I am not arguing that a pistol caliber combo is the ultimate solution, just that it's a good, inexpensive way to get started in shooting and serve the basic needs home defense, plinking and small or medium game hunting depending on caliber. This is not one of those "SHTF" or "the only guns you'll ever own threads," just seeing what's possible given the basic premise.

Owlnmole
July 10, 2011, 03:53 PM
Neat, but there is a whole whole range of .22 pistol/rifle combinations that would equal or beat that price and you'd have two guns, not one and a half. ;-)

Redneck with a 40
July 10, 2011, 04:57 PM
I'd go ahead and dish out the $1000 and get a Ruger GP-100 357 and a Marlin lever action 357, pretty sweet combo right there.

dagger dog
July 10, 2011, 05:51 PM
Have 3 combos;

Remington 12A .22 Rimfire pump , bought used, a basket case for $50.00, bought the parts needed to get it back shooting.
H&R Sportsman 9 shot 6" barrel revolver, traded a used auto pistol that was a gift.

Ruger 10-22 Kmart 1980 $129.00
Ruger MKII 6 7/8" Target ,used bought about the same time $100.00

Ruger NM Blackhawk .45 Colt 4 5/8"
Rossi 92 Lever action 24" octogon bbl. both for under $1000.00 last year.

I voted .45 Colt, load it down with TrailBoss for plinking - small game,(gotta be able to hit the head), load it up with H110, 280 gr home cast wheel weight bullets for Godzilla!

isc
July 10, 2011, 06:32 PM
S&W 915 and keltec sub2000.

Both are 9mm and use the same magazine. I paid $250 & $300 respectively for mine.

I also have a 5906 ($300), P11($240) and camp 9 ($325) that also use the same 9mm magazines

Rail Driver
July 10, 2011, 06:34 PM
I'd go with .45ACP if it were my purchase. I like my "thumpers"

CZ223
July 10, 2011, 08:24 PM
in 40 &W and Glock 22 police trade in will run about $650 if you shop around. Summitgunbroker.com has 3rd gen G22's for $349 right now. You can find the sub 2000 in same for$300 new if you search hard enough. I have seen a couple used for $250. I wish they, Kel-Tec, would make acarbine in 357 sig or 10mm that would take Glock mags. I would buy the 357 Sig in a heartbeat.

high country
July 10, 2011, 10:42 PM
.22 is the only one worth bothering with a combo, unless there are two guns that specifically strike your fancy in the same caliber. For example, I have a GP100, and think that a marlin 1894 in .357 would be great, and if I came across a Ruger Super Redhawk in .480 Ruger to go with my Puma in the same for a decent price it would become mine. None of these would save me money because I would load different cartridges with different bullets and powders for each. OK, so I wouldn't need different dies... Hardly a big expense in the grand scheme of a shooting habit. Pistol caliber carbines are a blast to shoot and reload for, but are not as useful as a carbine in a rifle. If you want a do-it-all carbine get something in .30 caliber (.308 Ruger Scout, Marlin .30-30 336, etc.)

.22 combos, on the other hand, are a great idea! A Henry and a Heritage; a Single Six and a 39; a Buckmark or a Ruger, and a 10/22 or Marlin 795... Everyone should have a few, and if you are worried about the economics of shooting, .22 is the way to go. This is nothing but pure fun! (and, if a person had a .50bmg ammo box full of .22 rounds, they would have a very portable and substantial ammo stash and a few guns to go with it. It would keep the family fed and dissuade all but the most motivated malfeasors for a long long time.)

ExAgoradzo
July 10, 2011, 11:57 PM
I'll repeat an earlier post...10/22 and a single six is great.

However, because we're talking budget here, I suggest the 357 blackhawk (a convertible also shoots 9mm) and a Marlin 1894 357. These may not be the cheapest guns on the market, but they will do a lot, will last a long time, and you will never want to get rid of them no matter how large your collection gets.

Of course, there are many fine suggestions above for cheaper guns...

JTHunter
July 11, 2011, 12:23 AM
This is technically a 2-way combo and, with all the guns involved, goes over the $600 limit. However, limiting it to just one rifle and the pistol, easily makes that limit, possibly leaving enough room for a second rifle.
1 - a Ruger SA "convertible" revolver (.22/.22 Mag){about 20 years old}.
2 - a Ruger 10/22 Carbine (about 15 yo).
3 - a Marlin 881 in .22LR (about 25 yo).
4 - a Marlin 983 in .22 Mag (2 yo).
As the 983 is the only recent price I have, it and the revolver would come too close to the limit to allow anything else. I don't know what the current prices are for the 881 but you might be able to get 1, 2, & 3 for less than $600.

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