.357 Mag help for a 4in Ruger


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Philippe
July 11, 2011, 11:42 PM
Hi folks im new here! I'd like to ask for some suggestions on what directions to go when looking for loads to shoot out of my Ruger Security Six 4". Also are there any loads that i should not use in this pistol, i would hate to over tax the firearm and cause it harm. Lately i worked up a few loads using Bullseye, Blue Dot, Universal and Power Pistol. They all shot great, but i did notice something different with the Power Pistol loads. Both the 9.0 and 9.5 grain loads seemed very stout compared to the others.

These were all loaded in mixed brass, small pistol primers and i was using 125 grain montana gold jacked hollow points. I would like to load in bulk using these 125 grain montana gold's and i really like the accuracy and feel of the Power Pistol loads but i just would like to get some feedback from others if these would stress this specific pistol too much.

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Haxby
July 11, 2011, 11:53 PM
That should be a reasonable load, and the Security Six has the reputation of being plenty tough. Have you shot any full-power factory loads for comparison?

Philippe
July 12, 2011, 12:32 AM
Yes, i have shot some of the Remington 125gr JSP, Corbon 125gr JHP's and a few other varieties of factory loaded ammo. I'd like to find something i can use in my Marlin .357 mag rifle that can feed both firearms as well that i can load in bulk as well.

ColtPythonElite
July 12, 2011, 12:59 AM
I load a lot of 125 gr JHP's. 10.0 grains of Power Pistol gets me 1422 FPS avg out of my 4" King Cobra. 10.5 grains gets 1460 fps. While either has a pretty sharp "crack" as far as noise goes, I wouldn't call them overly hot loads. The brass falls right out of my guns and there are no signs of excessive pressure, like flattened primers.

FWIW, you might want to take heed to Alliant's warning on using Blue Dot and 125's in a .357. They spent a lot of money advertising the alledged dangers, even though I don't believe them..... With that said, I have loaded thousands of 125 grainers over 14 grains of Blue Dot over the past 2 decades. That is not even the starting load according to my Speer #11 manual. It shows 14.3-16.3 to be the range for Blue Dot. 14 grains seemed plenty stout.

Fisherdave10
July 12, 2011, 02:59 AM
I have used 10grs of Power Pistol with 125gr Hornady XTPs. They shoot great. There are no signs of high pressure at all and the brass extracts easily from the cylinder. I don't really shoot factory ammo anymore so I can't say how the recoil compares but it makes a nice bang.

I recently bought some 125gr Montana Gold HPs and have loaded up 100 rounds with the same charge. I haven't tested them yet. My Alliant Reloader's guide says 10.5 is a max charge for a 125gr GDHP and will give a velocity of 1345fps but I think that's a really conservative measurement (perhaps tested w/ a short barrel). I haven't chrony'd my own yet. I have been using a S&W 586 4".

I did load 50 rounds with a 9.5gr charge of Power Pistol under 125gr Sierra Sports Master Soft Points since I wasn't sure what to expect with a different bullet design but they shot nicely with slightly less recoil. Now I use a 10gr charge.

ArchAngelCD
July 12, 2011, 05:50 AM
I will tell you this, IMO Bullseye is much too fast a powder for use in the .357 Magnum if you're trying to achieve the velocities normally associated with a .357 without going way overpressure.

Power Pistol and Blue Dot are getting close to what you need but powders like 2400, AA#9, W296/H110, Enforcer and 4227 are powders in the burn rate range to generate real magnum performance.

kludge
July 12, 2011, 09:54 AM
Lately i worked up a few loads using Bullseye, Blue Dot, Universal and Power Pistol. They all shot great, but i did notice something different with the Power Pistol loads. Both the 9.0 and 9.5 grain loads seemed very stout compared to the others.

Wait till you try 2400, No.9 and H110. :evil:

If it's in a load book from a bullet manufacturer or powder company it will be safe in your Ruger and Marlin.

Philippe
July 12, 2011, 12:11 PM
I have loaded some test groups with the 2400 and 296, one is using 158 gr deepcurls and the other is pushing 158gr Sierra jacked fp's. I used the data from the Sierra and Speer books for these loads. These are made specifically for the rifle though. However I have not gotten to test them yet.

Overkilll0084
July 12, 2011, 12:42 PM
The Ruger Security six is a very robust revolver. Loads that are in spec will not hurt it.
.357 doesn't get fun until you start with some of the slower powders. I started w/ 2400 for the boomers and see no compelling reason to change. Unique or AA#7 (along with other midrange to slowish powders) may be worth a look. H110/296 are a bit fussy for my taste i.e. very narrow operating range (hot & hotter only). Bullseye is good for mild to moderate work, but beyond that you've reached the point of diminishing returns. High pressure without the benefit of more velocity.

Fishslayer
July 12, 2011, 04:40 PM
I will tell you this, IMO Bullseye is much too fast a powder for use in the .357 Magnum if you're trying to achieve the velocities normally associated with a .357 without going way overpressure.

I'll agree with this. I use it for 125gr bullets but definitely keep on the light side.

Personally, I run 158gr JHP with 2400 for my Big Dog loads. Lots of anecdotal evidence re flame cutting and forcing cone erosion with uber hot light bullet loads.

This is where people chime in with tales of 50K rounds of maxed out 110gr loads with no problems. OK.

Drail
July 12, 2011, 10:12 PM
If using high velocity 125 gr. bullets keep a very close eye on the forcing cone. Hot loads with some of the powders mentioned under light bullets will do serious damage over time. You won't blow the gun but it's useful life will be much shorter. I learned the hard way.

ArchAngelCD
July 13, 2011, 02:14 AM
I have loaded some test groups with the 2400 and 296, one is using 158 gr deepcurls and the other is pushing 158gr Sierra jacked fp's. I used the data from the Sierra and Speer books for these loads. These are made specifically for the rifle though. However I have not gotten to test them yet.
What makes those loads only for a rifle? All .357 Magnum ammo you load should be within SAAMI pressure limits and can be used in any .357 Magnum rifle or handgun as long as it's in good operating condition. Just because it's a rifle doesn't make it any stronger than a handgun. If you won't shoot a certain ammo in your handgun I wouldn't shoot it in your rifle either.

chrt396
July 13, 2011, 03:27 AM
Can I get an AMEN!! I use 2400 and H110 in my 41 magnum...and love it! Kind of shock and awe!

Philippe
July 13, 2011, 08:01 AM
Arch, those rifle specific loads were taken from the Speer manual, the only reason why i think they out it in there like that has to do with the OAL, I am assuming the OAL is rifle specific so they will cycle.

Marlin 45 carbine
July 13, 2011, 11:35 AM
the 125gr jhp slugs I like power pistol.
the heavier 158gr jhp I prefer AA9.

Funshooter45
July 13, 2011, 11:52 AM
I've never tried the 125 gr bullets. I have shot a lot of 158 gr though and lately I have been shooting 180 gr bullets with goood results. I like #9 and Enforcer a lot. But my all time favorite load is around 15.9 gr of H-110 with a 158 gr JHP. It kind of stings in my model 60 with a 3" barrel, but it's nice to shoot in my Blackhawk. It shouldn't be too bad in the Security Six.

ArchAngelCD
July 14, 2011, 03:02 AM
Arch, those rifle specific loads were taken from the Speer manual, the only reason why i think they out it in there like that has to do with the OAL, I am assuming the OAL is rifle specific so they will cycle.
I don't know about the Speer manual but on the Hodgdon load data site they also list handgun and rifle load data for ammo like the .357 Magnum, 44 Magnum and other "crossover rounds". The powder charge, bullets, primers and OAL are identical in both sections with the velocity being the only difference. In the rifle data they report expected velocity from the longer barrel. Please look in your manual and check if that true there too and let us know.

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