Preventing surface rust.


PDA






JG727
July 18, 2011, 04:11 PM
What can I do to prevent surface rust on my MK II Ruger pistol?

I just moved and it was sitting on the wooden shelf in the bedroom closet for about a week.
2 or 3 days after I got here I noticed a small amount of surface rust.
I immediately oiled and brass wooled the spots. Then rubbed the whole gun with the silicone cloth I have.
Every day or so I would carefully pick in up by the wood grips, check for rust, and run the cloth over the gun again.
It prevented more rust on the barrel and action but this morning I discovered rust in more places. The magazine, the places where the wood grips meet the metal, the grip screws, and the main spring assembly. Places where I can't I can't get the silicon cloth. I had lightly oiled most of those plcaes with weapon shield oil, and greased the insides with weapons shield grease (where appropriate).

What am I doing wrong?

Or, what can I do better.

If you enjoyed reading about "Preventing surface rust." here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
MtnCreek
July 18, 2011, 04:17 PM
Based on your location, I would say you have a humidity problem in your house. Is the closet where you store the pistol near your bathroom?

A good coat of CLP should prevent rust, unless you have a bad humidity problem.

Mike1234567
July 18, 2011, 04:28 PM
I know it slows access in a SD situation but you might consider keeping it in a small ammo can with some dessicant.

ETA: You should be able to find one of the little .30 cal ammo cans for $5-10 depending on cosmetic condition.

Sheepdog1968
July 18, 2011, 04:30 PM
I'd try CLP or put coating of greese on outside. I agree it sounds like humidity. How about getting dafe with a golden rod. Or, put in tupperware with some fresh dessicants in addition to oiling it up.

JG727
July 18, 2011, 04:42 PM
SD isn't much of an issue, being a .22 pistol.

The tupperware sounds like a good idea. What type of desiccant would you recommend?

I've just moved to North Carolina, so the humidity isn't AS bad, but it certainly is an issue.

BCCL
July 18, 2011, 07:19 PM
I keep a can of Rem-Oil wipes on top of my gun vault to wipe down guns with, and for desiccant I went to WalMart and bought a can of the stuff they use to dry flowers with, got an old nylon stocking from the lady of the house and put a bunch in it and tied the end shut. Placed it in the bottom of my gun vault against the back wall, and have never had rust issues.

351 WINCHESTER
July 18, 2011, 07:26 PM
I used wd40 for over 3 decades. Never had a rust problem.

jimmyraythomason
July 18, 2011, 08:01 PM
A good wipe down with a cloth saturated in WD-40,Rem-Oil,CLP or any oil will work well. There are commercial oil wipes that are great for this. You can also use a good car wax.

ball3006
July 18, 2011, 09:24 PM
Get a can of LPS2. It is a milspec rust preventative and lube. I have been using it for ever and I have never had a rust problem. Just wipe it on with a rag and let dry. It is very similar, if not the same thing, as Breakfree, which is also a good product too......chris3

Daveboone
July 18, 2011, 09:32 PM
The problem probably started with it being on wood. Never leave a gun on a wood surface.
After handling, allways wipe down with product of your choice. Oily cloth is sufficient, but I have taken to wiping it down with a clean cotton cloth and spraying with a product such as Shooters Choice Rust Preventive barrier spray. It tends to have a better retaining character than just oil. Of course, now that it has rusted you must be more attentive.

Sauer Grapes
July 18, 2011, 09:46 PM
Spray it down with Eezox and be done with it. I keep an old POS handgun in my basement and it has never had to be touched in the last year.

KodiakBeer
July 18, 2011, 10:05 PM
+1 on the Eezox. In fact, I'd go so far as to say throw away all your various oils and gun greases and just use Eezox.

Maia007
July 18, 2011, 10:49 PM
Heavy treatment of Eezox, then stored in a Bore-Store gun sock. You can then place it inside a tupperwear or other airtight container to keep moist air away from it. The only treatment that would beat that would be heavy grease, which is only practical for long term storage.

I would suggest monitoring the humidity of your home. Excess humidity can ruin a lot of possessions.

JG727
July 18, 2011, 11:28 PM
Thanks. It's a humid house. Cardboard boxes (cereal and such) don't rip so much as they squish apart.

If I shouldn't put them on wood, is there something I can put down on the shelves?

JellyJar
July 19, 2011, 12:27 AM
As I sit here typing this I have a bad rash over much of my body. I just started using Breadfree CLP and got careless with it. CLP will cause bad rashes, at least in some people like me.

I made two mistakes. First I cleaned my gun in my bedroom and second I then let the dirty rag get mixed in my bedclothes as my bed was unmade and I must have slept on it a couple of nights.

It could be I am just hyper sensitive to it and you aren't. I am not going to use it again without gloves, long sleeve shirt, mask and using it outside.

Be careful! :cuss:

orionengnr
July 19, 2011, 12:37 AM
If you really want to see the difference between "oil", "CLP" and "real rust protection", take a look here:
http://www.thegunzone.com/rust.html
and then here:
http://www.6mmbr.com/corrosiontest.html
Good tests with real salt-water blast, and impressive results.

JG727
July 19, 2011, 01:09 AM
I know the difference, that was not the premise of any of my questions.

Mike J
July 19, 2011, 01:34 AM
The only firearm I have had a problem with rusting is a Kel-Tec P11. I started keeping the slide coated with Johnson's Paste Wax & I haven't had any more problems.

CTPhil
July 19, 2011, 10:00 AM
I keep a .22 in the barn, it's extremely humid. I left it out leaning against a wall for a few days and was shocked to see the amount of surface rust. I cleaned it up and sprayed it with food grade silicone. The rust hasn't returned, but I make sure I spray it every time I take it out and I let the sleeve soak up any excess.

I decided to go with food grade silicone on my guns so I don't have to worry about possible effects of petroleum products getting on my skin.

Onward Allusion
July 26, 2011, 05:23 PM
JG727 (http://www.thehighroad.org/member.php?u=151395)
Preventing surface rust.

Go get a ZipLock Vacuum bag kit and then pick up the 1 gallon size bags. Toss your gun in there with a thin coat of oil. Do your thing with the vacuum pump. I guarantee you that it will have an almost impossible time rusting (oxidizing needs oxygen).

HankR
July 26, 2011, 07:05 PM
The problem probably started with it being on wood. Never leave a gun on a wood surface.

I'd never heard this. I have an extra plywood shelf in my safe, and hadn't noticed any problems w/ well oiled, stainless handguns. Should I cover the shelf w/ carpet or something? My guess is the shelves that came w/ the safe are carpet-covered pressboard.

bri
July 26, 2011, 09:50 PM
Eezox.

Mike1234567
July 26, 2011, 10:30 PM
The problem probably started with it being on wood. Never leave a gun on a wood surface.

I don't see how this is an issue unless the wood is expose to water. Maybe if the wood is treated with chemicals?

ZCORR Jay
July 27, 2011, 04:30 PM
You can check out our line of ZCORR Anti Corrosion Gun Bags. Clean as normal, no extra grease or oil, insert into bag, firearms ready to be used immediately out of the bag. Depending on use these bags will prevent rust for up to 20 years.

http://i806.photobucket.com/albums/yy346/ZCORRJay/DSCN1696.jpg


We also have a vacuum sealable version that is 100% air tight and water proof.
http://i806.photobucket.com/albums/yy346/ZCORRJay/ZCORRVacuumFSPBags.jpg

And High Road members get 10% off

oldbear
July 27, 2011, 05:03 PM
http://www.borestores.com/, I keep my S&W M-27 in one of these and they work great.

Before placing gun in storage, Totally clean, apply a light lube of your choice, then with the grips off apply one or two thin coats of Johnson's past way. Let the wax haze up then buff off with a soft cotton rag. Depending on the storage and use conditions this treatment should last several months if not more.

Deltaboy
July 27, 2011, 07:01 PM
I used wd40 for over 3 decades. Never had a rust problem.
Another vote for good ole WD-40!!! I used it for years to wipe down guns and I never had any rust issues.

whalerman
July 28, 2011, 12:13 AM
I hate doing this. What is CLP? Thanks.

MartinS
July 28, 2011, 02:16 PM
Change everything. Put it somewhere else.

bhesler
July 28, 2011, 02:25 PM
I hate doing this. What is CLP? Thanks.

Breakfree CLP is similar to WD40 and is used as a cleaning solvent/lubricant.

www.break-free.com


Bret

Hangingrock
July 28, 2011, 02:33 PM
Go to Lowes and purchase a stand alone portable dehumidifier. I have one in the basement and we’ve not had a problem with humidity induced issues as you have indicated.

Ala Dan
July 28, 2011, 06:31 PM
I use "Blue Wonder", as its like putting a raincoat on your blued weapons;
no rust from use, no humidity issues, and helps a bit to resist holster wear
on firearms~! ;) :D

CajunBass
July 29, 2011, 04:20 AM
I use "Silicone Spray". My guns don't even show fingerprints, much less rust.

I spray it on. Wipe it off with a paper towel. Forget about them.

Pledge furniture polish works too.

CTPhil
July 29, 2011, 09:18 AM
It's still an ongoing experiment, but I'm using silicone spray on all of my guns.

mainmech48
July 29, 2011, 11:20 AM
Many years ago my friends and I started using a coat of silicone-based car wax on our hunting and CCW weapons. We found that it gave us better protection from corrosion that lasted longer between applications than any grease or oil product then available, plus it wouldn't "migrate" onto clothing or rub-off with routine handling.

As a bonus, we found that our firearms given this treatment could be stored for prolonged periods, such as between hunting seasons, and not show any rusting or other deterioration of the finish even if stored under less-than-ideal conditions. And unlike grease or oils, they won't attract and hold dust, lint or other airborne crud which can absorb moisture or react with it to form acidic compounds.

Since the demise of silicone car waxes, I've been using a couple of other products which have given me perhaps even better results: "Renaissance Wax" and the Blue Wonder "Armadillo" mentioned previously by Ala Dan. When applied as directed, they've proven to be highly effective, tough and very durable. Both can be had from Brownell's, Midway USA and other sources.

wep45
October 13, 2011, 10:50 PM
i use weapon shield exclusively on all my S&W revolvers

If you enjoyed reading about "Preventing surface rust." here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!