Selling your home


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dashootist
July 18, 2011, 11:35 PM
When you're not in the house, do you let the potential buyer go into your reloading room?

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bds
July 18, 2011, 11:42 PM
When we sold our house in 2005, to appeal to the most broadest buyers, house was cleared/staged and garage was cleared with just the work bench and storage cabinets (all reloading equipment/supplies were removed to an off-site storage).

With the current depressed real estate market, I would HIGHLY recommend that you clear anything that might offend even the smallest segment of the buyers, just in case. ;)

cfullgraf
July 18, 2011, 11:47 PM
I would, but you really don't have a choice if you want to sell the house. I don't think realtors would want to be barred from any area of the house for showing.

i would have everything stored away, no ammunition, powder, primers or components left out and all firearms locked in the safe. Area needs to be clean and tidy just like the rest of the house.

But then, I always have had better luck selling a house after I moved out. Unfortunately always a comprise between selling quickly and getting an almost acceptable price.

GW Staar
July 19, 2011, 12:07 AM
Buy a few plastic boxes with lids from Home Depot. Pack all your reloading stuff in boxes, and stack them in the garage. If you want to reload some evening, it wouldn't be that hard to bolt the press to the bench, get out your scale and components, and have some fun. Wouldn't be hard to put it away either.

I wouldn't want people to see my stuff, or my guns either for that matter....you have no idea what kind of people the realtor brings by. If they see your reloading equipment, it follows you have guns. If they happen to be criminals, casing houses that are for sale by posing as potential buyers, you may lose both. Same goes for other valuables too.

Jumping Frog
July 19, 2011, 12:08 AM
When we sold our house in 2005, to appeal to the most broadest buyers, house was cleared/staged and garage was cleared with just the work bench and storage cabinets (all reloading equipment/supplies were removed to an off-site storage).

With the current depressed real estate market, I would HIGHLY recommend that you clear anything that might offend even the smallest segment of the buyers, just in case. ;)
My house is currently for sale and that is exactly what we did as well. All reloading stuff went to an off-site storage facility.

While it is for sale, I have been living in a hotel in the new city. A Lee Reloader press mounted on a 2x4 clamps very nicely on a table top in the hotel room. I've loaded over 1000 rounds of .45 ACP in the hotel room.

WNTFW
July 19, 2011, 01:03 AM
I would not buy a house without seeing every room, attic, etc. I think the realtor would not respect any wishes of a room being of limits either.

rondog
July 19, 2011, 01:39 AM
Only bought one house in my life, but I remember when we were looking, we toured a LOT of houses that were fully lived in and crammed with all of the owner's crap. Not only did it feel wierd going through someone's house while they weren't home, but it's really hard to check a house out when it's full of stuff. A couple of them had some large and really unfriendly dogs caged up in the basements and garages, that was unsettling.

But there's NFW I'd leave anything of any value or gun related in my house if it was being shown. I'd have to damn near gut the place anyway, because I'd want it to sell quick.

Jeff H
July 19, 2011, 09:53 AM
I'd be more worried about the guns than the reloading stuff.

I agree with the majority here, clean the house of anything that would be offensive to anyone if possible. A small closet that can be locked might be fairly unoffensive if you can't or don't have the means to get it off site.

The last time I went house shopping a few years ago, we did tour a house with a small room under the basement steps with a padlock on the door. The Realtor and I just assumed there were guns in there and moved on. I wasn't really upset about not being able to see in that small room. YMMV.

hAkron
July 19, 2011, 01:20 PM
I'm going through this right now. I don't have any good hiding place for my reloading gear so there it sits in the basement. I would imagine that the casual observer wouldn't understand the purpose of the metal contraptions bolted to my work bench. The jugs of unloaded brass might give them a clue, but I doubt people look that close. I'm way more preoccupied with my mental plans for my NEW reloading space in my new house. It's going to be awesome!

CraigC
July 19, 2011, 03:19 PM
No, not until they're ready to make an offer. Virtually anybody can be shown a house for sale. No matter what they make or how much you're asking. As long as the realtor doesn't know for sure that they're just wasting their time. So no, I want as few strangers as possible knowing that I have guns in the house. Our brand new house was broken into back in June and I will be forever grateful that I hadn't moved any guns yet.

nofishbob
July 19, 2011, 04:58 PM
Also keep in mind that realtors usually will no take responsibility for things that are stolen while they are showing a house.

The control of a key box is not perfect, either.

I have had things as large as a power miter box disappear during a realtor's showing of a house. Since I was out of town for a few weeks, none of the realtors who showed the house in my absence could be bothered by my loss.

I won't even mention the damage done to my various houses even while the realtor was known to be in the house with the shoppers!

Anything small (or not so small) and valuable should be hidden , removed, or locked up before the house is shown.

Good luck!

Bob

Mike1234567
July 19, 2011, 05:00 PM
I've heard that some thieves will look at houses for sale just so they can get a good look at what's available to steal.

VP
July 19, 2011, 07:55 PM
I would pack it away. Although it might be hard to sometimes. I had a funny incident when selling a house a few years back (unrelated to shooting/accessories)

A few years back I was selling my house (2008?) and I got up and made breakfast like I always do. On my way out the door the realtor said he was going to show the house at 10 so to tidy up and he would come and do the last details before they got there. I did, and left for work.

The next day the person that view the house said that my house had an "offensive and funny smell".....the smell was bacon I cooked in the microwave that morning. I guess they've never cooked a day in their lives......

medalguy
July 20, 2011, 01:29 AM
The best way to sell a house is to stage it. That means removing nearly everything personal from the house so the potential buyer can imagine their stuff in the same house. That would include guns, pictures, clothing lying around, food items, whatever.

A neighbor had their house staged and sold it last month after 6 showings and 8 days. He's a woodworker and had to remove all his wood, tools, guns, everything. But it worked, and none of the potential buyers had any idea what he owned.

mgmorden
July 20, 2011, 05:42 AM
Last time I was looking at houses, I can honestly say that I immediately gravitated towards the empty houses. Wasn't a matter of what it was in the house - it just didn't feel like I was looking at somewhere to potentially purchase and move into if it was full of someone else's stuff. It felt like I was in someone else's home (note the difference between a house and a home).

IMHO, if you're serious about selling and can afford it, pack the stuff up and move it offsite. If you can move offsite yourself (short-term apartment lease or a weekly-rate hotel) that would probably help even more.

rfwobbly
July 20, 2011, 08:46 AM
My house is currently on the market. We have taken every non-essential piece of furniture, equipment and clothing out of the house for staging. My loading bench and gun safe are still there, but I've made sure to place all the loaded ammo, spare brass, ammo boxes, scales, reloading components, and other loose bits into full-size file cabinets we bought at yard sales. In this way my "man cave" looks to be more like a nondescript technical work area.

I've left the press on the bench, but it's covered by a white plastic garbage bag when not in use. The safe is in the back of a closet in the same room with several tall boxes in front of it, so it looks like another cabinet. The effect is of a spare bedroom turned into a home office with some technical machines, but there is no hint of anything that says "gun".

bds
July 20, 2011, 09:02 AM
Some potential buyers may get "lead concerns" if they see any reloading equipment ...

I think safe is OK and may be a negotiation item as many people want safes for other than gun storage (you may not even have to move that heavy thing if the price is right).

+1 to clean house/staged.

EMC45
July 20, 2011, 11:51 AM
I viewed a "home" once when I just gotten out of the Navy and the owner had given a key to the realtor. The house was a total disaster area. The owner also had guns everywhere. Had a locking gun cabinet, but also had guns laid all about. Dirty laundry etc. Needless to say....We did not buy!

CHALK22
July 20, 2011, 04:24 PM
When we were looking for a house a couple years ago, there were a few with gun safes in them. I remember thinking

"Man, I would not want to try to get that safe up those stairs and into this closet"

But at the same time I sortof thought it was cool to maybe buy a house from anothergun entusiast.

Mike1234567
July 20, 2011, 04:29 PM
I would ask if the guns/safes/supplies are accessories that come with the house. :D

Creature
July 20, 2011, 04:34 PM
I remove all safes and reloading equipment. Selling 101.

cfullgraf
July 20, 2011, 05:45 PM
Last time I was looking at houses, I can honestly say that I immediately gravitated towards the empty houses.

I am with you, i would rather look at an empty house than one with furniture in it.

But, most real estate agents these days want the house decorated to sell. Many want you to go out and rent/buy furnishings to really spiff up the place.

I would have to do a real detailed financial analysis before spending thousands of dollars just to make a few hundreds of dollars.

I always feel ripped off when I have dealt with a real estate agent, whether buying or selling.

EddieNFL
July 20, 2011, 08:30 PM
We bought first and sold after we moved out. Makes it a little harder to hid that spot on the carpet, though.

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