Apartment Reloading Setup


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dashootist
July 19, 2011, 02:19 AM
Hi,
I'm moving to an apartment. The problem is how to conceal a large reloading press. I've a Dillon 550 and a small reloading bench made out of 2x4s. I plan to buy some lockable foot locker and store powders and primers in there. But I'm not sure how to hide the Dillon from maintenance people and landlord. Any body got photo of their easily hidable setup?

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dashootist
July 19, 2011, 02:20 AM
...

Nushif
July 19, 2011, 02:25 AM
I do not hide it. Is there any reason you need to? Like something in the contract?

dashootist
July 19, 2011, 02:35 AM
I don't trust the maintance people. If they recognise it's a reloading machine, they would know I am a shooter and probably own lots of expensive guns somewhere in the apartment.

GLOOB
July 19, 2011, 02:48 AM
I don't get it. Your maintenance guys are grown men who keep a steady job. They have names, addresses, and social security numbers on file with the apartment manager. How many times do you think they can get away with stealing from tenants without ruining their life?

I trust all my maintenance guys. Know most of 'em by name. And all the front office peeps. I keep my primers and powder on a bookshelf in plain view. I often have a handgun in view, as well.

If you have special reason to distrust your maintenance guys, then I suggest you move. When your firearms make you feel less safe, maybe you're spending too much on guns, and too little on your place of residence.

You can also purchase renter's insurance.

That said, a Batman style hideaway reloading bench would be worth it just for the style points. :)

AK_Maine_iac
July 19, 2011, 02:52 AM
I do not hide mine. Matter of fact my maintenance man reloads with me. Plus he works for me, i trust him, and all of the other staff.
Although i don't trust some of my tenants. My complex has 75 unites, all walks of life. Most good people. But the others know i have a big dog,:evil: and own guns.

Lost Sheep
July 19, 2011, 03:21 AM
delete accidental duplicate post- internet claimed I was cut off.

Lost Sheep
July 19, 2011, 03:30 AM
I don't think the 550 is all that big, is it? Not like a 650 with case feeder.

I use a Lee Classic Turret. My press fits in one toolbox. My 7 sets of dies fit in another toolbox and safety glasses, all my powder (including scale and measure) and primer handling equipment fit in another toolbox. The only stuff that does not fit in the 3 toolboxes is a folding workbench (which could be replaced by my end table, properly padded) and my brass tumbler sits out on a shelf, but could go in a cardboard box when not in use. Tumbler is not really needed anyhow; it just makes makes my brass look nicer.

I can set up my press, scale, measure and lay out all my books and supplies and start cranking out rounds in less than 10 minutes. Teardown and packing up takes about 5 minutes.

I also keep an old bedsheet to spread out to catch any powder spills or lost primers (live or spent).

Before I got my reloading bench organized, I kept everything in a footlocker. Not as easy to move around, though.

Consumable components get stored in a separate cabinet/shelves.

It worked for me. Still does. I can pick up everything and in two trips from closet to car be ready to go over to my friend's house for a reloading session.

Good luck

Lost Sheep

jgiehl
July 19, 2011, 07:03 AM
My landlord like that I reload, she's always asking questions when she's in our apartment.
Maintenance guys that are in my place are always talking to me about what I load and shoot.
If they have a job like that chances are they won't risk it in this economy for some extra brass or primers.

cfullgraf
July 19, 2011, 07:08 AM
Many years ago during a move across country, I built a free standing press stand so that I could take reloading with me for entertainment before the family caught up to me. One benefit was I could store the press in a closet and out of sight.

I could use any table to hold the cases, scales, bullets, powder measure, etc.

I liked the free standing press stand do much I still use the concept today. But that is a preference thing.

But, I will agree with others, if you cannot trust your maintenance men, i would move. I would keep firearms, and maybe ammunition, locked up.

Not that I really like "strangers" in my abode when I am not there.

loadedround
July 19, 2011, 08:29 AM
First of all, have you considered using a folding work table like the Stanley or several others on the market( goggle search)? They will fold flat and can be stoed under a bed or closet. As far as the Dillon is concerned, why not just cover it with an old pillow case. I run two Dillon 550's and cover them that way to keep them clean and away from little fingers. If you have to leave your press out in the open, most people will think it's photo enlarger. Twice I've been asked why I need two enlargers..lmao from that.

chhodge69
July 19, 2011, 08:45 AM
Maybe you could cut the bottom out of a bird cage and place it with a shroud over the press.

MtnCreek
July 19, 2011, 10:01 AM
If you have residents above you, you may want to consider putting something above the press (on the ceiling) in case the primers detonate in the primer tube. The best I can tell from looking at the dillon primer tube, it seems to be designed to release the pressure / shrapnel out the top of the tube.

dihnen
July 19, 2011, 10:33 AM
I live in a condo building, and I worry that if neighbors or the condo board discover that I reload they will worry about safety. I can imagine them worrying about gunpowder explosions or whatever their imaginations conjure up, and then passing a condo rule that owners can't reload. This wouldn't be farfetched, my building already forbids dogs for instance. What a hassle it would be if I had to move.

So, to minimize the chance of losing my rights to reload, I store all my supplies in cabinets next to the reloading bench, and I bought a dust cover for my press. Hopefully, if someone comes over, they won't see the reloading setup, or I can come up with a story for what the covered press is (anybody have an idea for a good story???)

Right or wrong, I also worried about the Dillon primer tubes. So I own an RCBS Pro2000 which uses APS strips for priming--my theory being that their isn't any chance of punching a hole in the ceiling if they go off (I'll just be called "lefty" from then on...)

Nushif
July 19, 2011, 01:05 PM
Man, this is making me like my place more and more. Sometimes people even come by our apartment and ask firearms related questions ... The manager and maintenance guy once walked in, gave the whole place a once over and promptly started a friendly conversation not even closely related to guns ... and this is how my apartment looks.

http://i1085.photobucket.com/albums/j423/tealcrie/Guns/One.jpg

and

http://i1085.photobucket.com/albums/j423/tealcrie/Guns/Two.jpg

and

http://i1085.photobucket.com/albums/j423/tealcrie/Guns/Three.jpg

Now, if that won't set a apartment manager's alarm bells off, I don't know what will. Thus far no trouble at all. I'd say relax about it. The scarier you make it out to be that you own guns, the more people will pick up on that scary vibe. I swear private gun ownership is not a crime!

StandingTall
July 19, 2011, 01:58 PM
dashootist,

Check the "Corner Bench with Swinging Doors" plan here:

http://bulletin.accurateshooter.com/2008/11/free-reloading-bench-plans/

AK_Maine_iac
July 19, 2011, 02:55 PM
Dihnen Re: Post #14

You could tell them it is a press to install rivets or snaps on canvas tarps. Maybe an old apple coring machine/ peeler. But5 it does not work and you are waiting to get it fixed.:eek:

dihnen
July 19, 2011, 03:05 PM
AK Maine iac, thanks for the suggestion. You know, I've enjoyed relaxing and repairing canvas tarps for many years now--addictive once you get started :)

yankeedeerslayer
July 19, 2011, 03:35 PM
A closet bench set up would be perfect however...since space is probably already at a premium you might not want to give up a closet.

Another option would be one that is made of 2x8 lumber and screwed to the wall then install cabinet doors on the front. Make it as tall as you need with shelves to store your essentials. Stain or paint to give a craftsman appearance. Mount the press in a removable mount and store it inside the cabinet. To use open doors, slide in press, commence reloading. Easy. Saw one like this in the reloading bench thread but it had no doors or removable mount.

Last would be one of those particle board wall lockers from Wally World. Just anchor it to the wall and install a strong shelf for the "bench" inside. No one will be the wiser.

dbarnhart
July 19, 2011, 06:54 PM
I can understand not wanting the maintenance people to know what you have. Here in the 'desert southwest' a great many companies hire the least expensive people they can find, pay them in cash, and look the other way when it comes to 'documentation'.

I worked in a place a few years ago where the janitorial staff ripped us off like crazy. Anything of value left out on the desk would probably not be there when we came in the next morning.

The fewer people know I have guns = the fewer loose lips that can tell the wrong person I have guns.

"Three may keep a secret only if two of them are dead" - Ben Franklin

cfullgraf
July 19, 2011, 08:06 PM
Sounds like you need to make a closet secure and design your reloading gear to fit in the secure closet.

It's definitely a problem with apartment living.

W.E.G.
July 19, 2011, 09:29 PM
long, long ago...

http://i227.photobucket.com/albums/dd7/rkba2da/reloading/relaodingpress-Arlington.jpg

Shienhausser
July 19, 2011, 10:31 PM
ooooooo... put some spools of thread around it and post some posters of quilting designs on you're wall. Maybe spray some granny perfume around it. Guys dont know the difference between a sewing maching and a reloading setup haha.

gamestalker
July 21, 2011, 01:46 AM
I wouldn't be the least worried about hiding my reloading set up unless I have a well reasoned belief that the maintenance people are known to steal from the residents. It's also important that the appartment management follows the renatl laws. In this respect they must inform you at least 72 hrs. in advance that they will be entering your residence for what every reason, with the exception being an emergency problem, such as a water line burst or other type emergency circumstance.
About 20 years ago my Wife was home alone and the landlord decided he was going to enter OUR home, as considered by law as a renter without first notifying us. When my wife came out of the shower and was walking to the bedroom to dress she came face to face with him, she was naked. He nearly got shot moments later when she grabbed the 12 ga. 870 and warned him to leave and never come back without a 72 hr. notice of intention to enter out home, and then must knock first.

Lost Sheep
July 21, 2011, 03:22 AM
I wouldn't be the least worried about hiding my reloading set up unless I have a well reasoned belief that the maintenance people are known to steal from the residents. It's also important that the appartment management follows the renatl laws. In this respect they must inform you at least 72 hrs. in advance that they will be entering your residence for what every reason, with the exception being an emergency problem, such as a water line burst or other type emergency circumstance.
About 20 years ago my Wife was home alone and the landlord decided he was going to enter OUR home, as considered by law as a renter without first notifying us. When my wife came out of the shower and was walking to the bedroom to dress she came face to face with him, she was naked. He nearly got shot moments later when she grabbed the 12 ga. 870 and warned him to leave and never come back without a 72 hr. notice of intention to enter out home, and then must knock first.
I hear your outrage and share it (even though you, your wife and I are not even remotely related that I know of, and that tells you how remote our connection is).

However, what does your post contribute to the thread?

The primary reason I decided to respond to your post, though, is that, How would you know if the maintenance people are known to steal and what could you do about it (aside from moving)? Likely, though, you might be the first, and I would not want to volunteer for that position. (Same reasoning applies to stereos, computers, jewelry, etc.)

The reason I share your outrage is that I am still rankling from being burgled nearly 20 years ago. The sense of violation has mitigated somewhat, but never left. I thought I had lost my Coonan (a gift from a friend) but since I had just moved in, it was still packed and in storage and not delivered yet. Luck alone saved my guns.

The number of hours notice required by Landlord-Tenant Law varies from state-to-state.

When I live in rentals, EVERYTHING I cannot afford to lose is 1) heavily insured 2) locked away out of sight, locked or 3) elsewhere, in a more secure location.

Lost Sheep

GLOOB
July 21, 2011, 04:28 AM
How would you know if the maintenance people are known to steal?
Read the local news. Talk with your neighbors. Get to know the owner/management. Competent management? No problems.
and what could you do about it?
File a police report, notify the management, file an insurance claim, and talk with the neighbors. If it's a maintenance guy, and he's dumb enough to steal from tenants, he's probably going to get caught.

Course, if your stuff is worth a fortune, then that's different. But a few thousand dollars worth of guns... with serial numbers? No one in their right mind that works for the apartment is going to do that. Well, as long as the management is competent. I'd be far more concerned about other tenants with shady acquaintances. So look for the crackhead. :)

Deus Machina
July 21, 2011, 06:21 AM
Just a quick note on how to set these up--my Lee press is mounted to a piece of 2x12. Three C-clamps grip that down to the corner of the kitchen table. Loosen those, and the press comes off quick and easy, tucks away in the closet.

RandyP
July 21, 2011, 06:58 AM
How often do you actually reload? If not daily, why not just get a small footlocker with the capability to accept a padlock and store the press and components in it when not in use? Your small reloading bench becomes a plain old workbench.

If you enjoyed reading about "Apartment Reloading Setup" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!