S&W model 14


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30-30shooter
July 27, 2011, 11:57 AM
i recently acquired a model 14 for under 500 dollars. it is pinned with holster wear and a ring where the finish wore around the cylinder. the bore is in pristine condition. serial no. k947xx. the grips are in horrible condition. my questions are: what year was it made, was it a good deal and can you tell me a little about the history of the model 14 im not really familiar with smith and wessons

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natman
July 27, 2011, 02:09 PM
The Model 14 was S&W's target model. It's built on the K-frame, the same on used on the Model 10 that graced police holsters for decades and the model 19 357 magnum, among many others. Since it is the target model they usually have target features such as the wide Target hammer and Target trigger and the square Patridge front sight. They also have an overtravel stop not found on most other S&Ws. IME, 14s seem to have gotten a bit of extra hand attention compared to more mundane models, every one I've handled had a very smooth DA pull, which is ironic considering they are rarely fired DA as target revolvers. If it is early enough to have a pinned barrel you have a fine revolver indeed. Load it up with some wadcutters and shoot some tight groups.

351 WINCHESTER
July 27, 2011, 09:32 PM
Some were target models others for duty. Either way very fine revolvers the likes will never be made again. Good find.

Radagast
July 27, 2011, 11:49 PM
K947xx = 1950. The gun should not have a model number as model numbers were not introduced until 1957. It is a K38 Masterpiece, not a Model 14. Most Masterpieces have a six inch barrel, based on described condition you paid a biyt over the odds. If it has one of the rare 4 inch or 5 inch barrels then you probably paid a good price.

30-30shooter
July 28, 2011, 08:40 AM
if it was made in 1950 can it take +p loads? also would it be a stupid thing to have it re blued? i originally got it for plate shooting, that's why i ask.

Jonah71
July 28, 2011, 10:53 AM
I paid $440 for my 1958 Mod.14 4" bbl. a couple of years ago. Thought it was high at the time but I don't now. Unlike the one you describe, the bbl grooves in mine were pretty worn but the exterior was in really good condition. Gave it to a friend recently but did borrow it a couple of weeks ago. I don't think you will regret buying it.

Radagast
July 30, 2011, 09:44 AM
S&W doesn't recommend use of PlusP in pre 1957 guns. 1957 is when they started stamping model numbers, so it gives then a simple cut off point. In reality any post WWII gun is probably fine. There has been a lot of discussion on this question over the last few months with Old Fuff saying don't do it and Saxon Pig posting pics of his 1940s gun thats had 1200 rounds of PlusP through it with no issues.
I'm in the safe to use but expect slightly accelerated wear camp.

fecmech
July 30, 2011, 11:57 AM
I have a 14-3 that was purchased new in the 70's for PPC. After 50K+ rds of mostly wadcutter plus about 3K Military jacketed loads I sent it back to S&W for a general checkup about 1995. They turned the barrel in 1 turn, recut the forcing cone and installed a gas ring on the cyl crane and the total bill was $42.! I have no idea how many rounds since but at least 20K of mostly 158 rn and 4.2 of Bullseye as I now shoot a lot of Hunters Pistol silhouette with it. The gun is very accurate and has a beautiful 2 lb. trigger. The blueing is worn and it's not pretty anymore but it's one gun I will never sell. BTW when I bought it new with target trigger and hammer it was $135.

Jim K
July 31, 2011, 11:16 PM
Hi, fecmech,

It is about impossible to turn an S&W barrel in one turn because of the front end center pin lock. I think S&W put a new barrel on your revolver, something they do fairly oftehn (or used to) if the barrels show any significant wear. Of course, if you want the $42 back...

Jim

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