Background check and being a gun owner cost me a great job.


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Kingofthehill
July 29, 2011, 12:01 PM
I hope this is an ok place to put this but just wanted to share a situation that happened to me.

I applied at a large medical facility and was given the green light for the job but all i had to overcome was the background check which being a CCW owner and a commercial Class A driver with hazmat endorsement, i wasn't worried.

I have several friends that work there, a friend in the HR department told me that the corporate legal team axed me and I didn't get the job.

Why you ask? Because the extensive background check has web crawlers that found me on gun forums. Now, I am not some idiot with a gun... when someone asks what to buy i say training... Ive worked at ranges and have been a range officer and am very very safety minded.

my friend in HR told me even though i am not supposed to know that the reason i was passed over.

I trust my buddy with my life, he too is an active shooter but doesn't visit gun forums. This company had a shooting at one of their facilities a few years back and they are on high alert because of it.

is this just a sign of the times? im a very stand up person, i don't party, drink, do drugs... i follow all the laws, have perfect attendance and always go above and beyond and if it wasn't for a back injury, i was going to be a sheriff but it came out in the academy that i had a physical limitation.

the worst part is that im not supposed to know this, so i can't bring up discrimination or anything like that. Since its "At Will" they don't even need to give me a reason.

my fiancee works there and her boss who was hiring me was excited to bring me on and went on about how qualified i was and that i would be a good fit but now i just got axed.

Moral of the story, be careful what you post online... even if its nothing bad, just being associated as a "Gun person" is enough to kill your chances at a job you were hoping to get.

the only reason they have a valid 30.06 sign at their facility is because i informed my fiancee of the laws and rules that need to be followed, so if it wasn't for me their circle/line cross over a picture of a gun sign wouldn't be valid.

Ive never even had a speeding ticket and now my name is tarnished it seems... how does this happen

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ugaarguy
July 29, 2011, 12:06 PM
I'd contact a civil rights attorney just to see what your options are.

fatcat4620
July 29, 2011, 12:09 PM
Sounds like you were discriminated against for a lifestyle choice. I would tear this company a new one on the internet and make it very known.

CTGunner
July 29, 2011, 12:13 PM
Because the extensive background check has web crawlers that found me on gun forums

How is this possible? I'm not doubting what you are saying but would like to know how they connected you to forum postings? Have you posted with your full name - pictures of yourself?

USAF_Vet
July 29, 2011, 12:15 PM
Ive never even had a speeding ticket and now my name is tarnished it seems... how does this happen

While it sucks you didn't get the job, your name is far from tarnished. Being passed over for a position doesn't effect anything except your pride.

I'd talk to the HR director of the company and ask them why you didn't get the job. It's not illegal to not hire someone, so contacting a lawyer is a bit out of bounds at this point. Unless you can prove a clear cut case of discrimination against you as a gun owner, hiring a lawyer and filing suit will probably not get you very far, and it certainly won't get you the job.

Perhaps have the manager who wanted you on board go to HR and plead your case for you.

I know it sucks not getting a job. I was a shoe in for a job, and I was passed over because my step-dad also works for the company, albeit at a different facility. Funny considering the company is a family company, with generations of family members who work at the same facilities. Sometimes HR can be a real PITA for no good reason.

CoRoMo
July 29, 2011, 12:18 PM
I'm not as optimistic as the first two posters, but could you please explain further how this...
...the extensive background check has web crawlers that found me on gun forums.
...happened? I assume that your real name is not Kingofthehill.

I know a guy who got fired from his job after making chit-chat with a customer. He made a whimsical reference that let the customer know he was a gun owner. The customer complained to his employer. He was swiftly fired.

longdayjake
July 29, 2011, 12:20 PM
You are better off. BTW. Deputies go to the academy. Sheriffs get voted in. You could be a quadrapalegic and still be a Sheriff.

Kingofthehill
July 29, 2011, 12:24 PM
I only know this due to their HR rep who is a friend of mine.

As for posting my real name, on a local texas gun forum im on, i do post under my real name and i made a post about the job interview and how i was excited since it went so well and the company's name was listed after someone asked me where i applied.

I can't just go after them for discrimination since im not supposed to know this information and then it could possibly cost my friend his job.

thats the tricky spot im at now

JoeMal
July 29, 2011, 12:24 PM
I'm interested to see how this will play out. 'Technically' you probably aren't supposed to be privy to the information as to why you weren't hired. So bringing in legal counsel would put one of your friends at risk...someone had to talk for you to find out that information.

And when it comes to the company, I'm sure there's probably no way to prove that's why you were denied the job. I'm sure the meeting was conducted verbally. While the situation stinks big time, I'm not sure what you can do about it. Of course I'm no lawyer. Good luck in the future.

Kingofthehill
July 29, 2011, 12:26 PM
I'm interested to see how this will play out. 'Technically' you probably aren't supposed to be privy to the information as to why you weren't hired. So bringing in legal counsel would put one of your friends at risk...someone had to talk for you to find out that information.

And when it comes to the company, I'm sure there's probably no way to prove that's why you were denied the job. I'm sure the meeting was conducted verbally. While the situation stinks big time, I'm not sure what you can do about it. Of course I'm no lawyer. Good luck in the future.

you hit the nail on the head and understand my situation completely

JustinJ
July 29, 2011, 12:29 PM
Were you on a gun board at this job or did you get caught on a gun board while at work at another job? Did you visit a gun board from a computer supplied by this compay? Unless one is using a real name on a message board how would they be able to figure such a thing out with out illegal hacking your computer? Something is amiss with this thread. Or the buddy is lying.

Standing Wolf
July 29, 2011, 12:37 PM
I doubt this will amount to any consolation, Kingofthehill, but here's my prediction: five years from now, you'll be glad you didn't get that job. You'll be happier with the job you did get, and won't mind not hanging out with people who look down on you for exercising your Second Amendment civil rights.

Best of success to you!

Kingofthehill
July 29, 2011, 12:39 PM
no, i don't talk guns or log onto forums while at work. And with this employer i have only been in there for a face to face interview so no, i haven't logged onto any forums there.

22-rimfire
July 29, 2011, 12:43 PM
I think you have little recourse on this potential job. I have interviewed and not been offered jobs. They choose someone else or in some cases, move somebody into that position internally. Any legal action on your part will put your friend's job at risk.

As far as the background check, I have no idea. They may well not have hired you because you have a CCW permit. I suspect that probably showed up on your background check. That's the price of liberty.

Many hospitals absolutely will not hire you if you smoke and they do pre-employment tests to confirm this. That doesn't seem fair to me if you don't smoke on the premises. But it appears to be legal.

jelayne
July 29, 2011, 12:44 PM
Sounds like the Company's loss to me.

Frank Ettin
July 29, 2011, 12:45 PM
It is becoming increasingly common for employers to look at social networking Internet sites as part of pre-employment screenings. See http://finance.yahoo.com/news/Social-Media-History-Becomes-nytimes-510406413.html?x=0&.v=1 for example.

You are, of course, free to communicate how and what you wish, by your speech, by your actions, what you may post on the Internet, how you act and what you say in public (the Internet is a public place); but that does not mean that doing so is without social consequences.

You may be free to "communicate", but others are free to either pay attention or not. And others are also free to form opinions about you, your credibility, character, values, or beliefs based on how and what you "communicate."

How you present yourself to the world is up to you. But you can't complain when people form impressions of you or make judgments about you based on the way you do present yourself to the world.

As far as how one might be identified, I think we'll need to hear from some computer experts on that. I understand that someone who knows what he's doing can get a lot of information about your on-line activities starting with things like email addresses or email correspondence.

jrhyne
July 29, 2011, 12:46 PM
Unless one is using a real name on a message board how would they be able to figure such a thing out with out illegal hacking your computer? Something is amiss with this thread. Or the buddy is lying.

This. Your buddy may have let it slip in conversation that you were into guns and it was downhill from there....he just didn't have the stomach to tell you what really happened.

KingContraryMan
July 29, 2011, 12:47 PM
Forget it and move on. If you pursue this, at best you'll have a job where you "forced" your way in (you'd be a target from the git-go) and at the worst your friend there gets canned.

pacerdude
July 29, 2011, 12:54 PM
I agree with Kingcontraryman, just let it go. I'm looking for a job right now too, and it does suck going to interviews and thinking it went well, and then you still don't get the job, but hey that's life. Besides your fiance' and your friend still work there, so raising cain about this situation probably wont do them any favors.

Also to keep it on topic, I also agree with the poster who said that your CCW permit may have showed up on the background check.

Anyways good luck in your career pursuits.

Kingofthehill
July 29, 2011, 12:55 PM
i don't have a problem chalking this job off as a loss... i can accept that.

What scares me is that being a gun owner and being on forums (not doing anything wrong or stupid) will cost me future jobs if they perform the same background checks.

This all has something to do with a "web Crawl" as it was listed on the paperwork. I in no way will risk my friends job there.

JoeMal
July 29, 2011, 01:04 PM
Do you have a Facebook/MySpace/LinkdIn/etc account that may refer to your Kindofthehill name? Maybe that's how they 'found' you?

Could your buddy have possibly said something about your account if probed?

Kingofthehill
July 29, 2011, 01:09 PM
Do you have a Facebook/MySpace/LinkdIn/etc account that may refer to your Kindofthehill name? Maybe that's how they 'found' you?

Could your buddy have possibly said something about your account if probed?

Nope... I have a facebook but it has my name and my fiancee set it up for me, its basically a blank page, i don't use it and it doesn't have any info other than my old high school and and home town.

parker51
July 29, 2011, 01:19 PM
He said he posted under his real name on a Texas Gun Board.

"As for posting my real name, on a local texas gun forum im on, i do post under my real name and i made a post about the job interview and how i was excited since it went so well and the company's name was listed after someone asked me where i applied."

Based on this, they could have found him by using "Google".

buck460XVR
July 29, 2011, 01:29 PM
As for posting my real name, on a local texas gun forum im on, i do post under my real name and i made a post about the job interview and how i was excited since it went so well and the company's name was listed after someone asked me where i applied.



This may have been your demise. You identified yourself and the place you thought you were hired at on a public forum. Just a simple Google search of your name would bring this up. Someone researching you may have found this and took offense at something you said. With the amount of qualified folk applying for ANY job these days, employers make hiring decisions on appearance, first impressions and gut feelings. Bringing up the employer and stating that the job was already probably yours may have been all it took to make the difference.




I only know this due to their HR rep who is a friend of mine.

Now you have identified a person on a public forum, that by your admission broke company rules. Sometimes it's better to say nuttin' at all.

natman
July 29, 2011, 01:29 PM
He said he posted under his real name on a Texas Gun Board.

"As for posting my real name, on a local texas gun forum im on, i do post under my real name and i made a post about the job interview and how i was excited since it went so well and the company's name was listed after someone asked me where i applied."

Based on this, they could have found him by using "Google".
Bingo.

It's a real shame we have to resort to pseudonyms, but "gun owner" is not a class that is protected from discrimination by bigots.

At least not yet.

Kingofthehill
July 29, 2011, 01:33 PM
This may have been your demise. You identified yourself and the place you thought you were hired at on a public forum. Just a simple Google search of your name would bring this up. Someone researching you may have found this and took offense at something you said. With the amount of qualified folk applying for ANY job these days, employers make hiring decisions on appearance, first impressions and gut feelings. Bringing up the employer and stating that the job was already probably yours may have been all it took to make the difference.

I never said i thought the job was mine, i just said i was excited and that it went very well.

Now you have identified a person on a public forum, that by your admission broke company rules. Sometimes it's better to say nuttin' at all.

I know several people there in HR. SEVERAL...

Bozwell
July 29, 2011, 01:39 PM
Sorry to hear you didn't get the job. I doubt you have any legal or even moral recourse here, but it's probably for the better in the long run. It does serve as a reminder though to watch what information you put out onto the web (especially when it's attached to your real name).

Best of luck finding a job that's a better fit.

Dnaltrop
July 29, 2011, 01:41 PM
My condolences neighbor...

I don't post my real name online, I don't post pictures of my family online... I don't socially network... My wife uses facebook, but it's locked down to a few friends, and not in her name either.

hso
July 29, 2011, 02:03 PM
so i can't bring up discrimination

You can't bring it up because it isn't discrimination under the law and we shouldn't act like it is. They found hits on the net for you and based on the classification of the sites it raised a flag. They probably never even looked at your posts.

What is curious is how they found anything on you if you didn't use your name.

Gozer
July 29, 2011, 02:06 PM
Unfortunately, firearm ownership is not a protected category (and never will be), nor is there any case law I know of that sets any other precident (there are cases relative to rental housing, but nothing on employment). Even using pseudonyms you can (surprisingly often) still be tracked down by some of the software these background check companies use nowadays (what would once have taken an investigator to root up - which noone would pay for - can now be done automatically by data mining software for less than $100). Your in-your-name postings would have made it easier, but don't trust a pseudonym alone to protect you. Also, your posession of a CCW alone may have been sufficient in their eyes.

All any of us can do is to refuse to frequent (when possible) enterprises that discriminate against gun owners in hiring, just as many of us tend to minimize our business relationships with enterprises that ban on-premises concealed carry by customers. It's unfortunate, but that's about it. (Well, as always try to educate the public about how the legally-armed citizen is at a minimum not a bad guy, but that won't help get HR/Legal to back down - they fear getting sued after an incident.)

CoRoMo
July 29, 2011, 02:13 PM
What scares me is that being a gun owner and being on forums (not doing anything wrong or stupid) will cost me future jobs...
It's time for a clean-up then.

You may or may not have noticed that over the years here, members have requested to have their screen names changed, and the Admin here is able to oblige. What you need to do is contact webmasters or admins of all the sites where you use your real name and request that they change it for you. You might even want it to be something other than Kingofthehill so that all the member profiles are not all linked together.

This goes for anyone else who might be interested in changing things up too. Maybe leave the city out of your profile location, don't allow your birth date to be viewable through your profile, and definitely don't let your email address show up visible in your profile.

SSN Vet
July 29, 2011, 03:21 PM
now you know why there are companies out there like this one....

http://www.reputation.com/

Be especially careful about Facebook. I read an interview with Julian Assange in which claimed that FB had a built in portal for government data mining.

Makes ya wonder.

FROGO207
July 29, 2011, 04:50 PM
Way back in the beginning, post #8, the OP SAID that he used his real name and also ID'd the organization that he was interviewing for. THIS is how he was linked not some internet black magic.:banghead: Do some of you folks read ALL of the posts before you weigh in on a subject? Any way ANYTHING that you put into the cyber-net should be considered ALWAYS THERE FOREVER. Those nekked pix of you with that distinctive tattoo in a scandalous predicament could come back to haunt you when say, running for public office decades later. Be smart about these things and protect yourself/your reputation. What may have been funny or a reputation booster may hurt you in the long run IMHO.:scrutiny:

ArfinGreebly
July 29, 2011, 05:00 PM
When I first joined the online communities I chose my nom de Web in a fit of whimsy, partly as an homage to an uncle of mine.

Since then I have had occasion to be grateful that my real name has not been exposed in certain contexts. I will refrain from detailing those. Suffice it that I sometimes work around persons with somewhat squishy thinking tendencies.

Yes, there are a couple of pictures of me out there. My name doesn't accompany them, but anyone acquainted with a certain well-known shooting personality would find it unambiguous.

There was a time, back in the days of the earliest wikis, that my real name was used, and while that has never come back to bite me, there have been a couple of close calls.

In a time when standing up for your rights is often viewed as a radical activity, it can be a liability to be thus exposed.

When I'm rich enough or independent enough that my income no longer depends on the good graces of people whose politics and motives cannot be known until it's too late, I won't give a damn who knows what about me.

Until then it's OpSec and prudence.

CoRoMo
July 29, 2011, 05:00 PM
removed

trex1310
July 29, 2011, 07:58 PM
A lot of people don't know that perspective employers check your
credit report these days and a bad one can cost you a job.
I just thank God that I am now retired.

psyshack
July 29, 2011, 08:30 PM
Yep,,, posting on the Texas gun board with your real name got you. The farther away one can get from large corporate america, the better off you will be imho.

FIVETWOSEVEN
July 29, 2011, 08:37 PM
I guess if your name is John Smith they are in the middle of a lake without an oar with these searches?

WTBguns10kOK
July 29, 2011, 08:39 PM
Rule #1, don't disclose your name or address on the internet. The internet is about take, not give, unless you really have to or know what you're doing.

Rule #2, repeat Rule #1.

Rule #3, trust one.

Sunray
July 29, 2011, 08:44 PM
"...go after them for discrimination..." Seriously doubt you have a case. "Gun owner" isn't a thing covered by any anti-discrimination legislation.
"...tear this company a new one on the internet and make it very known..." Good way to get sued.

razorback2003
July 29, 2011, 09:26 PM
You probably wouldn't want to work at this company if this is the way these folks are. It would not be a pleasant place to work and your job probably wouldn't last long.

LiquidTension
July 29, 2011, 09:27 PM
Background check and being a gun owner cost me a great job.

I have to disagree with your premise here. Any company that refuses to hire you because you are a gun owner is probably not a place that you want to work. If the leadership doesn't approve of basic constitutional rights, there's no telling how morally corrupt the organization is. Or I could be totally off - in my profession being a gun owner isn't usually frowned upon.

Bonesinium
July 29, 2011, 09:45 PM
If you really cared you would ask them what the reason they didn't hire/fired you was and found out the reason from them first hand. If what you say is true, I'm not sure how great the work environment would be for you anyways...or the answer may surprise you.

Just sayin'.

Jorg Nysgerrig
July 29, 2011, 09:48 PM
If you really cared you would ask them what the reason they didn't hire/fired you was and found out the reason from them.
"We have decided to go with another candidate. Thank you for your interest."
It's extremely unlikely that any company will give you more information than that.

BK
July 29, 2011, 10:09 PM
If the leadership doesn't approve of basic constitutional rights, there's no telling how morally corrupt the organization is.
Forget the "leadership". What they have is a general liability insurance policy and an insurer. They also have a legal adviser, usually in the form of a law firm who works for them. You can be assured that legions of attorneys work for the insurance company who provides them with that liability policy.

Those are the offices who are calling the shots. Especially in light of the recent shooting that the OP mentioned. They write company policy for all intents and purposes. The insurer will dictate a hiring process, or no insurance, take it or leave it. If you were the "leadership", you'd probably opt for insurance too.

TennJed
July 29, 2011, 11:02 PM
the only reason they have a valid 30.06 sign at their facility is because i informed my fiancee of the laws and rules that need to be followed, so if it wasn't for me their circle/line cross over a picture of a gun sign wouldn't be valid.



How did you inform them of this? Was HR aware of your helping to identify this. I don't know if it would affect it, but maybe someone took your action on this as a sign that your were a "gun person" which may have lead to more scrutiny.

I am only asking not accusing. I actually wondering on your behalf.

psyshack
July 30, 2011, 01:00 AM
I have been thinking about this issue and the so called friends in the dumping ground of HR college grads.

Are these people in HR really your friends? Or are they folks you know, passer by's in the walk of life? Did they know you shoot? Did/Do they know of the criteria of which back room HR functions? Do they really know who you are?

To me it does not sound like it. If they knew you would be flagged as a shooter with a very simple web search. Are they really your friends? In my world a true friend would never set you up for a gut punch,,,, never! If they had no idea you were a shooter to be honest. I would not refer to them as friend. They would fall under know your name, human simple network relations. Social Quaintness. A true friend would never lead me to failure! Never if they knew my hobby or life style would lead to failure within there wicked web of a pay check.

As a past hospital employee in maint. and plant operation's. I left the profession when I saw the ilk of college boy and lawyer ID and fundamentals take over. Joint Commission and the under layment of INS, recovery realistic. Not to mention the insane federal government intervention. And the most important person in the hospital that is ignored the most is the house keeper / (college boy term) Environmental Specialist. With out the low paid and no respect cleaner. No amount of medical skill and tech can keep you alive.

Sooo are these HR folks really your friends? Honestly I don't think they are. I have friends still yet in the medical settings. From clinical to hospital all over the country. My nick name is Psycho in this setting. Not because I was mean or out of control. Because I refused to let anything fail that was within my scope of employment. Failure was not a option.

I'm going to have surgery next month to repair two major hernias. I will be in the hospital for 3 days or so,,, maybe 5 depending. I have already contacted my friends in security, maint. and engineering. My surgeon and I know each other. I will carry my PF-9 into the admin area and then let security, secure my pistol and it will be returned to me with no and if or butts about it once I'm off the pain pumps and meds. Mean while my wife and three adult daughters will carry there S&W 60's as they see fit while I am in.

Are these HR folks really your friends? From what I see,,,,, they don't have your back and can not be trusted..... Burn me once I watch you slow boil.

Kingofthehill
July 30, 2011, 11:51 AM
they are my friends, 2 life long and another for the last 10 years. We shoot together and BBQ with families at least once a month... we help eachother work on our cars/projects... i trust my life with these guys

tbutera2112
July 30, 2011, 11:58 AM
hopefully your fiance doesnt lose her job now because she is engaged to you.....hopefully "her performance" doesnt "suffer" or anything....ive seen people who work with their spouse or family member, and when one gets fired the others suddenly have poor performance and have to be let go as well....goodluck to you both, im sure you will find something

ns66
July 30, 2011, 06:25 PM
not much you can do, but worth a try: find out who the higher up boss is, write a nice email to him, hope he can probe the HR, and hopefully HR will tell him the "can't be told" reason and the boss likes guns or not bias against it, then you might have a chance

good luck

481
July 31, 2011, 11:56 AM
they are my friends, 2 life long and another for the last 10 years. We shoot together and BBQ with families at least once a month... we help eachother work on our cars/projects... i trust my life with these guys

If these three people in HR participated with you in these activities at least once a month, then the person making the decision to pass you up didn't need to search the 'net to find out that you own and shoot guns.

People chat casually in office settings about such pastimes (which is then overheard by everyone else in the office, be assured of that) and the fact that you are a gun owner was known to everyone there long before this interview was scheduled.

Loose lips sink ships.

armoredman
July 31, 2011, 12:08 PM
There are two classes of people of whom is it not only legal to discriminate against, but encouraged in many places - gun owners and smokers.

gym
July 31, 2011, 12:20 PM
Had the same thing happen after being hired, at an internet co in 2001. Got called to HR, and the guy was irate that I had a license for almost 30 years at the time.Little did I know they ran such an intence background check, but they never asked that question. He asked me why I needed a gun, I saw this was going noware and told him it was none of his business. He warned me about even having one in my car. I told him scince it was a public parking lot and they didn't own it, if they broke into my car to seach it, "he said they would". I would have him arrested and sue both him and the company, I turned and walked out leaving him yelling that he was calling legal. I told him he could call who ever he liked. Nothing was ever done, but I left shortlly thereafter. It was clear that I had nothing in commen with these robots. The company was owned by Perot, the same one that ran for president. If I were you I would contact an attorney who specializes in this type of crap. They will tell yu at no cost, if it's worth persuing it or not. If you find one who is of high moral character, he may even do it pro bono, although I wouldn't count on it, it does fall under discrimination.

Jorg Nysgerrig
July 31, 2011, 12:44 PM
Something doesn't add up. The three people in HR are shooters, yet the OP claims he was rejected merely to being a member of a gun forum?

If they are being truthful, I suspect they found something more in those posts than, "Where's a good place to shoot?" or "What can I use to remove copper fouling?"

I think a large medical facility in Texas would have a hell of time finding staff if the criteria for rejection was merely owning a gun.

We aren't getting the full story here.

481
July 31, 2011, 12:52 PM
J-

I thought that I might have been too subtle in what I was communicating (#51); seems I wasn't.

There is definitely more to this than meets the eye. :scrutiny:



:)

Justin
July 31, 2011, 12:57 PM
For those scoffing at the notion of being investigated online for a job, there are now firms that specialize in vetting prospective job candidates by running searches for them on the web, and they put all of the information found in a report.

Gizmodo had an article on this a few weeks back. (http://gizmodo.com/5818774/this-is-a-social-media-background-check)

While I've never hired a firm to do this, any time I've interviewed a prospective candidate for a job, I always ran searches for their name on Google, LinkedIn, Facebook, and Myspace just to see what popped up.

rust collector
July 31, 2011, 01:16 PM
We'd like to think we have all the important facts, but we are all human and our perception is impaired by our beliefs and desires. Our attention span is increasingly abbreviated and we all like to think we are wiser than we are. This applies also to HR folks, who must try to make good calls with limited information and obligations to efficiency and corporate values. Not easy work, and the stakes are very high. A bad hire can wreck the ship.

The takeaway here is that if it ever was anonymous, the internet is becoming far less so. Data mining tools and techniques are becoming much more sophisticated, and we must once again face the reality that we will be judged by our words and actions.

Is that a bad thing?

psyshack
July 31, 2011, 02:35 PM
My concern is. If the friends in HR knew protocol. Why would they subject there buddy to this and or quietly warn about the hobby/interest.

Tully M. Pick
July 31, 2011, 03:22 PM
Doesn't sound like a great job to me. Why would you want to work for someplace you have to hide something that means a great deal to you? I post online under my real name and don't hide the fact that shooting competitively means a great deal to me.

I'll happily go on the record and state publically that if you have a problem with me shooting for competition, recreation, hunting, or the sheer joy of making holes in paper with things that go bang, you can kiss my ass because I'm not changing who I am and what I like to do.

buck460XVR
July 31, 2011, 05:49 PM
I'll happily go on the record and state publically that if you have a problem with me shooting for competition, recreation, hunting, or the sheer joy of making holes in paper with things that go bang, you can kiss my ass because I'm not changing who I am and what I like to do.


touché.........spoken like a true Cheesehead!:D

Kingofthehill
July 31, 2011, 07:24 PM
Something doesn't add up. The three people in HR are shooters, yet the OP claims he was rejected merely to being a member of a gun forum?

i was given the green light here at this facility but legal at their main office flagged my record with a direct link to the post.

i swear on my life this is what i know and have been told by trustworthy friends.

Jorg Nysgerrig
July 31, 2011, 07:43 PM
legal at their main office flagged my record with a direct link to the post.
So what does the post say? What it just the post talking about the interview or something else?

browneu
July 31, 2011, 07:59 PM
i was given the green light here at this facility but legal at their main office flagged my record with a direct link to the post.

i swear on my life this is what i know and have been told by trustworthy friends.

Man I feel for you. I had something similar happen to me and know how it feels. Its bad that we have to hide a hobby or become typecast as a paranoid nut that will shoot anyone who doesn't agree with you.

Sent from my LG-P999 using Tapatalk

Kingofthehill
July 31, 2011, 08:07 PM
So what does the post say? What it just the post talking about the interview or something else?

in the 3 page thread about me saying i had an interview and i was excited that it went very well and the pay increase would be very nice, another member brought up the fact that i could get that STI ive been wanting, and i said how maybe i would treat myself to it if i got the job as a new chapter in my life.... the thread turned into questions about which one i was looking into and a new guy asking if it would be a good first gun.

so the company's name in the thread got blasted with a lot of flag words like gun, shooting, ect...

WinThePennant
July 31, 2011, 08:40 PM
I think you just learned a lesson. Do your best to bifurcate your personal life from your professional life.

The more I see Corporate America in action, the more I believe that every man of substance should find a way to earn a living outside of it.

J.A.D.
July 31, 2011, 10:33 PM
All someone has to do is look for your e-mail address online, and a list of places you frequent can come up. If someone's gathering information on you, who you are, it's available on the web. I've been denied work myself for similar reasons. The thing that bothers me the most, is that they can have the wrong person, and never give it a second thought. The internet is a place where anyone can be anybody they choose, and pretend to be someone else, out of spite. I've seen that happen too. It's a funny thing to be the man you are, and have people judge you by what they think is you on the web.

SFsc616171
August 1, 2011, 08:59 AM
This is not a "gun" answer. I hope that the OP can get some solace from this:

First, I do think that "you'se got a raw deal."

Second, as a "counterpoint", let's examine where I am at, as you would balance yourself against this bad employment decision, with the information provided.

1. I'm a Connecticut Yankee, living in the bogs, and among the uneducated sons and daughters of of Huey P. Long. (separate story)

2. I'm a licensed Pagan Priest, and 5-year running 'guest sermon' columnist appearing the regional newspaper, living amongst the largely, Southern Baptist populace.

3. I have a video page online, with my recorded comments, mostly generated during the legal conflict between the V.A., and the Pagan Community over headstones, yet do NOT do the Facebook/MySpace/Twitter thing.

I have been passed over for positions, in the past. I fixed that. I went freelance.

Geckgo
August 1, 2011, 09:36 AM
Wow, SF, I'm in a VERY similar boat, almost scary similar. Cept I never really investigate why I don't get hired, I don't even think about it. One time I called a company to follow-up the interview to be told I was passed over. After a few nice words with HR I was asked if I would take a different position at the company. Showed up for work 7 days later.

heeler
August 1, 2011, 09:37 AM
I guess a lot of people in the early days of the net used their real names on forum boards.
I did.
No more though.
As far as not getting hired unfortunately Texas is a right to work state that basically gives the employer 120 per cent power in firing or hiring.
You have always heard that the employer can fire you for a just cause or any cause as long as it's not based on race or religion etc.
Be careful what you put to print less those same web bots discover that your HR friend spilled the beans on the why you were not hired and they send him out the door.

eagleno49
August 1, 2011, 10:07 AM
I dont know if this would make a difference or not but there are a few "famous" people that share my name. A NFL player, a cricket player, and a rugby player. I would think that would help clog up the search a bit

rscalzo
August 1, 2011, 10:26 AM
I think a large medical facility in Texas would have a hell of time finding staff if the criteria for rejection was merely owning a gun.


I was thinking the same thing.

bsheets20061
August 1, 2011, 11:34 AM
Though I am not completely sure I believe they would still be obligated to give you a reason for your being passed over on the position applied for. They may give you a generic answer but you can hire and attorny and can get the real answers, it they are dicriminating against you for simply practicing your legal rights in this "free" country then I would go after for them for everthing they are worth. If one thing is certain we can be walked on for our right and our beliefs. God, guns, and country

heeler
August 1, 2011, 12:11 PM
Again...Since Texas is a right to work state they could hire him and just turn around and fire him.
For whatever reason.

Bubbles
August 1, 2011, 12:39 PM
I know for a fact that the background investigator who worked on my application knew that I held an FFL (because I had to put it on the form and was asked about it during my interview) and it didn't affect me getting a top secret clearance at all.

The Lone Haranguer
August 1, 2011, 12:47 PM
It is pretty common for employers to do a Google or other search on a prospective hire. I assume your Internet gun-related postings were tasteful in nature. If that was all it took to reject you, that wasn't a job you wanted anyway or would have kept if you did get it, trust me.

Jorg Nysgerrig
August 1, 2011, 06:31 PM
I assume your Internet gun-related postings were tasteful in nature.
One thing to keep in mind is that you are also judged by the company you keep. Even if his posts were perfectly fine, being a board with "questionable" posts may be enough to knock someone out of the running.

The job market is saturated with job seekers and hiring mistakes are expensive. That means employers can be as selective as they want.

blowfeld
August 1, 2011, 06:42 PM
Gun owner is not a protected class. If they did not hire or fired you because you were black, white ect. or were Catholic, or because you were a woman or old or handy capped, that is protected. I can not give you a job or rent a home to you because you are blond, or have a mustache or own guns. Nothing you can do about that but suck it up. I can just say I don't like plumbers and will not rent to plumbers and its not discrimination that the gov. sees as a protected class.

withdrawn34
August 1, 2011, 08:09 PM
And unfortunately, even if gun ownership was a protected class, HR could still just make up some flippant official excuse for not hiring or even firing you.

rori
August 1, 2011, 08:45 PM
It is becoming more and more common for large and not so large corporations to not hire and even fire people for riding motorcycles, skydiving, scuba diving, motor racing and yes owning guns and hunting. They feel its dangerous to do those and other things and that they have the right to control your every move. Havent heard of anyone coming out ahead in a lawsuit yet.

WinThePennant
August 1, 2011, 08:56 PM
It is becoming more and more common for large and not so large corporations to not hire and even fire people for riding motorcycles, skydiving, scuba diving, motor racing and yes owning guns and hunting. They feel its dangerous to do those and other things and that they have the right to control your every move. Havent heard of anyone coming out ahead in a lawsuit yet.
You are CORRECT.

Yet another reason why we need a public option. When you engage in "high risk" activity, employers only see large medical bills and higher insurance costs coming their way.

PPGMD
August 1, 2011, 09:47 PM
the only reason they have a valid 30.06 sign at their facility is because i informed my fiancee of the laws and rules that need to be followed, so if it wasn't for me their circle/line cross over a picture of a gun sign wouldn't be valid.


Why would you do that? Did you want another place where you couldn't carry?

Anyways that is why it's important to have some level of a firewall between your work, your hobbies, and your online identity. Companies using internet search services are becoming increasingly common.

I never tell anyone at work that I own guns or shoot. I don't tell them my private email address that I use for my online forums.

22-rimfire
August 2, 2011, 11:04 AM
Start you own business... your business, your rules....

rfwobbly
August 2, 2011, 01:02 PM
+1 on the Bingo!

You know the law, and carry a gun. I can't think of a worse employee profile.

You look like a Tea Party type too. Big trouble there. You might plaster the plant bulletin boards promoting Congressional candidates with actual accounting degrees.


Trouble !! :scrutiny:

WinThePennant
August 2, 2011, 01:48 PM
There is no question but that US Corporations want SLAVES and not self-reliant free thinkers working for them.

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