What are the pros and cons of the Ruger GP-100


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ahusk93
August 1, 2011, 01:17 AM
I am thinking of buying a Ruger GP-100 with a 4 inch barrel chambered for .357 magnum, i am hoping to get some info from people with experience with this particular model.

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sidheshooter
August 1, 2011, 03:48 AM
Cons: it's big, heavy, and a little rough.

Pros: Darn near everything else.

Buy with confidence.

Trahma Hownd
August 1, 2011, 03:52 AM
I have one and I love it. It is well built, accurate, easy to shoot full load 357s out of and is quite nice to look at. It's simply a joy to shoot.

jgiehl
August 1, 2011, 04:33 AM
Can take a beating and keep on shooting. It can be exposed to psychotic reloads and just smile. Yeah it's heavy but on the plus side it's so heavy if you run out of ammunition you can chuck it or use it as a club.

BigN
August 1, 2011, 05:24 AM
All the pros listed but I've found none of the cons. I like a beefy revolver so it's not too heavy for me. And beautiful? Shiny like the day I bought it. I don't often fire full power loads since most around 3/4 max or so are more accurate at a given range but I've sent some nasty wrist-busters through it and she never protested once.

41 Mag
August 1, 2011, 05:34 AM
I have two of them, with the 6" barrels, and the only thing I changed were the grips on the one with the under lug, and the sights on the one without the under lug.

Of the two I couldn't tell you which one I liked better as they are both very accurate, and tough as you can get.

For carrying I might give the edge to the lighter one, but since I usually carry a Redhawk or Raging Bull in the woods, neither is really an issue.

I highly suggest once you get it, to look on the parts list, and order a set of the gold dot and v-notch sights for target use. I find them great for both target and hunting as I can get a much finer bead on what I am shooting at. For the price they are sure worth having a set at least to give a fair shake.

ahusk93
August 1, 2011, 05:35 AM
Thanks for the input so far guys, keep it coming.

RevDerb
August 1, 2011, 06:01 AM
Pros: Good looking, durable, reliable, accurate, reasonably priced, backed by perhaps the best customer service in the firearms industry.

Cons: :confused::confused:

Here's my carry:

http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn268/RevDerb/Handguns/RugerGP100005-1.jpg
http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn268/RevDerb/Handguns/RugerGP100010.jpg
http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn268/RevDerb/Handguns/RugerGP100003-1.jpg

The proper holster makes all the difference in the world.

ahusk93
August 1, 2011, 06:06 AM
What kind of grips are those RevDerb

MrBorland
August 1, 2011, 06:53 AM
I offered my thoughts before, so rather than re-type, I'm just cutting and pasting:


I only own S&Ws, but I've been impressed with the GP100. When a local top-notch wheelgunner local recently became the 1st to classify as a USPSA Grand Master with a speedloader-fed gun, I had the opportunity to check out and shoot his gun - a nicely tuned GP100.

As far as durability, most seem to focus on the differences in metallurgy, but, really, both are plenty strong from this perspective. I believe the bigger differences are in the design elements:

1. Smiths use a single screw/plunger assembly to hold the cylinder/crane in, which is one of their weak links - with enough hard use & reloading, it can bend. Bend enough, and the cylinder won't shut, or will even fall out of the gun. I've seen both happen. The GP100 doesn't use such a system, and it's impossible to even removed the cylinder/crane assembly until the trigger assembly's been removed.

2. Another S&W weak link is their ejector rod: It not only turns as the cylinder turns, but it's also used to lock the front of the cylinder in place. If the rod gets bent a bit, the bent rod turns against the retaining plunger under the barrel, which could affect the smoothness of the action. The GP100 ejector rod, in contrast, doesn't turn with the cylinder, nor (IIRC) is it used to lock the front of the cylinder. IIRC, the front of the cylinder is locked in place by a mechanism that links the crane to the frame, closer to where the actual force is being generated.

Other GP100 niceties include:

3. Front sight: The GP100 (at least the adjustable sight version) comes with an interchangeable front sight. Some S&Ws come with interchangeable sights, but most don't. Though they can be converted, it'd take some milling by a gunsmith (read: time & $$) to accept the Weigand base.

4. Reach to the trigger: Again, I'm going by memory, but IIRC, the reach to the trigger seemed shorter on the GP100, so one can use grips with a covered backstrap to reduce recoil, while still having a manageable trigger reach.

So, what are/were the GP100 cons?

1. I understand Ruger won't sell certain parts if they break, so you'll have to send the gun to Ruger for repair. If you send it back to Ruger, though, they'll send it back in factory configuration. No biggie if your gun is stock, but if you've spent money to tune & modify it, it's a big issue. And if piece of unobtainium does happen to break on your tuned GP100, then, you've got yourself a real headache, I suppose.

2. Historically, the fit and finish of Rugers weren't up to that of S&Ws, and the factory action's typically been rougher. The good news is they respond well to some basic smoothing & tuning. My GM buds GP100 was smooth as silk.

KJS
August 1, 2011, 06:56 AM
Cons: it's big, heavy

When firing Magnum rounds some might not consider plenty of weight to absorb recoil a con.

Virtually the same size as a S&W 686, well, except for price that's less big.

jmr40
August 1, 2011, 07:06 AM
A GP-100 is actually 1 or 2 oz lighter than a comparable S&W 686 and will fit in the same holster and uses the same speed loader. Some guys seem to think they are big heavy monsters when they are not.

They are most commonly compared to the 686. The Ruger is a modern design that will take more abuse than the Smith. They are easier to fieldstrip and clean without tools. The cylinder lockup and ejection systemm are much stronger than the Smith. If I wanted a 357 revolver that could go to hell and back and still work I'd buy the Ruger.

The Smiths I've shot were all a bit more accurate and smoother in operation.

The Rugers only real downside is long term value. The Smith & Wesson revolvers I own have all increased in value dramatically over thte years. A used Ruger just does not hold it's value if you ever decide to sell later.

murdoc rose
August 1, 2011, 07:24 AM
Find a set of grips that fit you well and it will never fail you.

IlikeSA
August 1, 2011, 07:38 AM
Pros: everything mentioned

Cons: I wasn't happy with the trigger (the sides were sharp) but it was nothing that a little sanding and polishing can't take care of.

bikemutt
August 1, 2011, 10:25 AM
I don't care for the trigger shape, my finger wants to ride up to a spot that doesn't feel like the "sweet spot" to me. I'm getting used to it, reluctantly.

Everything else is great!

Rexster
August 1, 2011, 11:39 AM
Pros: It fits me superbly, as if the guy who designed it has hands just like mine. This is especially true of the factory grip, and way the trigger is shaped; I can perform well at speed with the GP100, compared to other handguns.

Cons: There can be rough edges on some parts. Moreover, it is not good at cooking my breakfast, or polishing my boots, and it cannot perform brain surgery. Horrid!

Wishoot
August 1, 2011, 11:45 AM
Pros: Big and Heavy
Cons: Big and Heavy

There's really a lot to like about this gun. It soaks up nasty recoil from a big .357 round and makes shooting .38 spl similar to shooting an air gun.

I wasn't overjoyed with the DA on it at first, but a quick swap of springs changed that.

snakeman
August 1, 2011, 12:15 PM
Big, heavy, crappy trigger.

Accurate, reliable, good sights, tough as nails.

ErictheRed
August 1, 2011, 12:32 PM
The 4" GP 100 was my first handgun and I love it. I do not conceal carry, so the weight is a big plus for recoil. I've never shot anything out of it that was uncomfortable. Accurate gun, built like a tank, fits my hand very well. Great value too in my opinion. Shoots .38's so you can save a little money on ammo.

Every time we go shooting on the farm, my buddies all want to fire off a few even though they're mostly semi-auto guys.

baylorattorney
August 1, 2011, 12:48 PM
It may be beefy but it's slender like a 1911 almost. Great for carry. The only con I can think of is the rear blade sight breaks in the middle if abused.

GLOOB
August 1, 2011, 01:57 PM
Cons:
The trigger reset is a bit anemic. On my brand new Ruger, the trigger actually started failing to reset when it got dry. I had to disassemble it to oil it up.

The single action trigger isn't as good as my Smith. But it's still really, really good.

The lockup isn't as good, either. My Ruger's cylinder will rotate a bit at full lock. My Smith cylinder rotates a bit, too, but it always returns back to the counterclockwise most position after you let go.

One con on my Smith, it has a noticeable stricture near the forcing cone, which theoretically could reduce the accuracy with lead bullets. Haven't noticed anything, though. Both guns are very accurate.

If I had to choose between my GP and 686, it would be practically a coin flip. I might choose the Smith, just because I have a nicer holster for it. It's hard to find a good holster specifically for a 3" GP100.

Josh45
August 1, 2011, 02:14 PM
Pros: Heavy & big. Less recoil! Able to use .38 spl, 38 spl+p, 38 spl +p+, and full power .357 without worry. Feels good in hands. Shoots great.
Cons: None. ( To each their own! )... :D

I love mine! Its the 3' tho. I like the weight and feel of it. It feels awesome to me and the fact that I can use those loads listed makes it more of a reason as to why I like it.

Although, If I had to list a small con, It would be the DA trigger. I would recommend a lighter DA pull. Bout it really..

CraigC
August 1, 2011, 02:47 PM
Pros? It's not a S&W. It's a more modern, more robust, tougher design. It was laid out with the .357 cartridge in mind. T`wasn't an afterthought. It's a tough, accurate and dependable sixgun that will undoubtedly last several lifetimes.

Cons? It's not a S&W. The design and finish are utilitarian. It doesn't really appeal to those of us who love older S&W's. The action is not as smooth, tuned or not. Grip selection is dismal. If what you want is a nicely figured, properly fitted set of Ropers, it'll cost you three times as much. It lacks refinement and that little intangible something you can only get in an older Smith.

918v
August 1, 2011, 06:38 PM
Pros: strong, durable, accurate

Cons: crappy fit and finish, substandard single-action trigger pull

GP100man
August 1, 2011, 07:25 PM
I`m Biased !! can`t find a CON , if you compare late production ANY revolver to the late production Rugers !!!

http://i746.photobucket.com/albums/xx110/GP100man/102_0333.jpg

RevDerb
August 1, 2011, 08:52 PM
What kind of grips are those RevDerb
http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=659227

Jeb21
August 1, 2011, 09:08 PM
Love the Ruger gp 100 but found it difficult to aquire aftermarket gear such as holsters. I found that a Python holster fits the Ruger ok, but then saved up an purchased a custom holster from John O'Roarke.

jad0110
August 1, 2011, 09:14 PM
A GP-100 is actually 1 or 2 oz lighter than a comparable S&W 686 and will fit in the same holster and uses the same speed loader. Some guys seem to think they are big heavy monsters when they are not.

In my hand, the 686 in an equivalent barrel length has always felt lighter and more lively. Maybe it's the grip / frame shape, or maybe the S&W's center of mass is a little closer to the rear. I dunno, I just know I don't want any more muzzle heft than either in a 4" barrel.

As for a some guys thinking they are a big heavy monster, I suppose that depends on what you are accustomed to. If your favored gun is a Ruger SRH or a Desert Eagle, I can see where the GP would feel lithe. Then again, if you prefer the older Ruger Six Series and S&W K Frames (as I do), then the GP (and 686 for that matter) both feel a little clumsy.

So for me, the pluses and minuses for the GP are:

+: Excellent bang for the buck, new or used. Durable, and serviceable (cylinder bolt notches over the chambers, non turning ejector rod, etc). Easy to disassemble. Soaks up recoil.

-: Ugly as sin (I know, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but they are darn ugly to my eyes ;)). The billboard, need I say more? Though usually smooth, the triggers often exhibit more stacking and a more mushy return than I prefer. Lastly, the "strength to massiveness ratio" is IMO (for my preferences), not as optimal as the older Six line. The older Sixes are nearly as durable, but are much bulker than a S&W K Frame.

But YMMV.

asia331
August 1, 2011, 10:24 PM
Love the Ruger gp 100 but found it difficult to aquire aftermarket gear such as holsters. I found that a Python holster fits the Ruger ok, but then saved up an purchased a custom holster from John O'Roarke.

Check out Simply Rugged Jeb. I think you'll be pleased.

preachnhunt
August 1, 2011, 10:49 PM
Pros: Accurate
Good Looking
Durable
Excellent value at a reasonable price

Cons: Lots of sharp edges
Hard to see front sight

I smoothed all the rough edges on a felt wheel and replaced the front sight on both of my GP100s and I LOVE them. Excellent guns!

Waywatcher
August 1, 2011, 11:31 PM
I've got the same grips on my GP100 as RevDerb and they fit me like they're made for me. My glove size is "Large." The factory Lett grips were too small and I got too much finger on the trigger.

I agree with most of what has been said as regards to Pros and Cons, particularly MrBorland.

Pros:
Accurate
Reliable
Durable
Blued is an option!
Easy-to-change sights
Easy field strip for cleaning

Cons:
Sharp edges
Limited aftermarket support

ErictheRed
August 2, 2011, 10:54 AM
asia331: Check out Simply Rugged Jeb. I think you'll be pleased.

+1. The Simply Rugged Sourdough Pancake works well for my 4" out in the woods.

rishooter
August 2, 2011, 03:43 PM
The Gp-100 has no downside except it's kinda big and heavy for CCW,but great for HD or a car gun.
I own a 3" and my daughter has a 4"model.
The GP100 will eat 125 JHP screamers like candy.110's also if you bother with those rounds.
Very little recoil and I've not seen a Six Series or Jeep break down yet.

_N4Z_
August 2, 2011, 06:14 PM
I have a 6 inch SS GP100. Don't ever plan on getting rid of this piece. It is very accurate, smooth both DA and SA, and handles everything from powder puffs to fire breathers without issue.

All Pro, no Con for me.

ColtPythonElite
August 2, 2011, 08:18 PM
Pros: Relatively inexpensive. Tough. Accurate.

Cons: Not so attractive outta the box. However, it can be dressed up a bit.

bergmen
August 2, 2011, 08:19 PM
Pros: Everything
Cons: Nothing

There you have it.

Dan

Drail
August 2, 2011, 10:04 PM
Cons - triggers with 90 degree corners. Bring me the idiot that thought a square edged trigger was a good idea on DA revolver. Raceways inside every Ruger frame with enough machine burrs left in to grate a pound of cheese. Little flakes of metal waiting to break off and jam the action. Seriously though, these things are easy for any smith to fix and I suppose it helps to keep Ruger's prices down at a level most folks can afford. Actually I own an early GP 100 and it is most definitely a well engineered revolver. The original wood and rubber grips fit just about everybody's hand and handle recoil nicely. Excellent adjustable sights. They can be abused but you really have to try very hard. They will withstand abuse that would make a S&W cry. My wife shot IPSC and steel with one for years and it still drills the center out of a target if you are up for it. Most of the parts you will ever need to repair one are available from Ruger at ridiculously inexpensive prices. They won't sell you a hammer or a sear (probably a wise idea from their standpoint) but there are other sources that will. If the LEO market was still using revolvers the GP 100 would be in a lot of holsters.

harmon rabb
August 2, 2011, 10:14 PM
I`m Biased !! can`t find a CON , if you compare late production ANY revolver to the late production Rugers !!!

this. these aren't your grandpa's revolvers anymore. smith everything has gone way downhill to the point that i can't for the life of me see how a 686 is supposed to be worth $150+ more than a GP100.

for the gp100, the only con i can even think of would be the weight, but that's also a pro.

the SA trigger isn't up to par with the SA trigger of my old k-frame, but the same can be said about a new 686 anyway. the DA trigger of my GP100 is actually pretty light and slick. so i guess the trigger is a pro. other pro's... stronger design than the smiths, soaks up recoil very well (38spl feels like a 22), easy to cock the hammer, and if you run out of ammo, you could beat someone to death with the gun itself.

if what you want is a full size 357, you couldn't possibly be disappointed or make a bad choice in buying a gp100. the same can be said about the smith 686 too, in the interest of full disclosure.

harmon rabb
August 2, 2011, 10:20 PM
As for a some guys thinking they are a big heavy monster, I suppose that depends on what you are accustomed to. If your favored gun is a Ruger SRH or a Desert Eagle, I can see where the GP would feel lithe. Then again, if you prefer the older Ruger Six Series and S&W K Frames (as I do), then the GP (and 686 for that matter) both feel a little clumsy.

My GP100 was my first revolver. I own a few others now (SP101 which is my carry 357, and a LCR which is my wife's carry gun). Anyway, I recently bought an old school (early 60's production) k-frame to find out what all the fuss is about with these old guns.

After becoming used to the heft of the GP100 and SP101, picking up the k-frame is a joke. It feels like some delicate little flower, and like you could take the GP or SP and beat the k-frame to death with it :D

Jeb21
August 2, 2011, 10:37 PM
Thanks, Asia. I will check them out.

DenaliPark
August 2, 2011, 10:52 PM
The GP100 is one of the few firearms produced by Ruger that I'd recomend without reservation, they got it right when they designed this one...

roaddog28
August 2, 2011, 11:32 PM
Well I like others have both a GP100 and a S&W 686 older prelock. Most people will see little difference in either except for the trigger actions.

I like both for shooting 357 magnum rounds. Other than a my Blackhawk or a N frame S&W the GP100 and 686 are the best for shooting 357 magnums.

Pros on GP100.
Modular design.
Easy to field strip and clean.
Best lock up mechanism.
Strong trigger group.
Cons on GP100.
Refinement.
Resale value is lower than a S&W.
Trigger can need work but is easy done.

If I had my choice I would buy a GP100 new over a S&W. The GP100 is better value.

But as good as the GP100 is I would rather shoot my Ruger Police Service Six. Its better balanced. The same goes for my 686. I would rather shoot my S&W model 19. Again better balanced. Unless your going to shoot hundreds of 357 magnums all the time most people will be fine with a Ruger Service/Security Six or S&W model 19.

I maybe clouding you decision but you need to try several different revolvers out before you make a decision. Don't make your decision based on a internet forum.
Good luck,
Howard

rick300
August 3, 2011, 12:18 AM
I've got the six inch. The only problem is the wife loves it. If she goes to the range I don't get to shoot it much, but it keeps her going to the range so I'm good with that. She shoots it well and for her I believe heavy is good. Rick
[URL="http://http://s110.photobucket.com/albums/n116/rick300/?action=view&current=PICT0359//http://s110.photobucket.com/albums/n116/rick300/?action=view&current=PICT0359.jpg[/URL]

rick300
August 3, 2011, 12:55 AM
Ok, so I can't post a pic sorry. But we both love The Gp 100 Rick

7even6ix2wo
August 3, 2011, 01:44 AM
The trigger is good but just, not as smooth as a 686 IMO. Great revolver though, especially for the money compared to some of the other .357's out there. I've heard complaints about how noisy the spring is when the hammer's down and it flops around. Never bothered me any.

bergmen
August 3, 2011, 01:49 AM
I've got the six inch. The only problem is the wife loves it. If she goes to the range I don't get to shoot it much, but it keeps her going to the range so I'm good with that. She shoots it well and for her I believe heavy is good. Rick
[URL="http://http://s110.photobucket.com/albums/n116/rick300/?action=view&current=PICT0359//http://s110.photobucket.com/albums/n116/rick300/?action=view&current=PICT0359.jpg[/URL]

That's the ugliest looking revolver I've ever seen, no definition, no color, no details, nuthin'.

JK.

Dan

easyg
August 3, 2011, 09:46 AM
http://i112.photobucket.com/albums/n165/allenXdog/HPIM7181.jpg

Pros:
Extremely accurate.
Great trigger action in both DA and SA.
Very well balanced in the 4" model.
Extremely robust design.
Excellent modular design for field stripping.
Front sight is a breeze to change.
Very classy looking.
Able to withstand a constant diet of the hottest loads.
Outstanding "bang for the buck" price.
Made in the U.S.A. by an American company.
Excellent customer service.
Best cylinder release design of any revolver.
Perfect weight for a 4" .357 revolver.



Cons:
Isn't available in .45ACP with moon-clips.

scottishclaymore
August 3, 2011, 05:43 PM
I have a 3" one that I use for frequent carry. Cons: none to speak of, really, other than its bulk which sometimes makes summer carry challenging. Pros: Everything else about the gun.

scottishclaymore
August 3, 2011, 05:55 PM
Cons:
Isn't available in .45ACP with moon-clips.

I echo this, not because I prefer .45 ACP to .357 Magnum (because I don't), but because .45 ACP is an interesting cartridge and the GP100 seems sturdy enough to handle it.

psyshack
August 3, 2011, 08:30 PM
RevDerb has the GP100 pistol to own! It's the only GP100 I want. And would like one in 6". But they don't make it.

I had a LGS check on one for me with Lipsy. They were out with no current ship date. :(

Rexster
August 3, 2011, 09:26 PM
Pros should carry the GP100. Cons should not carry any firearm.

As for resale value, if I own the weapon in question, that is irrelevant! Except for pieces with historical value, no handgun is a good long-term investment. Moreover, I am keeping all of my GP100s! If I want to buy a good pre-owned revolver, lower resale value is a GOOD thing, as that means I get more value for my money.

paddling_man
August 3, 2011, 09:47 PM
I love my 4", fixed sight GP100. Other come and go but one of my kids will likely end with this one.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v481/paddling_man/guns/rugersalga.jpg

bergmen
August 3, 2011, 10:00 PM
http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=659227

Just ordered one for my GP100.

This site is just great for separating me from my money...

But it's all good...

Dan

MRH
August 3, 2011, 11:02 PM
Pros: heavy, built like a tank, accurate. Little or no recoil with light loads.
Cons: heavy. My .357 4 incher came with interchangeable plastic front sights. They kept leaving the gun, never to be found. Before I lost the only one left, I ordered a metal sight. No problem since.
P.S. On a whim to further reduce muzzle flip with heavy loads, I had mine MagNaPorted. Very little to no flip with any loads I use.

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