Have you ever had an ND?


PDA






duns
August 6, 2011, 05:55 AM
There has been a lot of debate recently about how many people have had an ND. Some people think that those who have had an ND form a large proportion of the shooting population. Others think that it's just a small percentage. In the interests of science(!), please use this poll to indicate whether or not you have ever had an ND.

For clarification, NDs at the range, with your gun pointing towards the backstop, where there was no potential danger to anyone, don't count.

If you enjoyed reading about "Have you ever had an ND?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
jmresistance
August 6, 2011, 06:09 AM
I cocked my Judge before I had it pointed at the target and it went off. That trigger is pretty light with the hammer back! But it was at the range and hit the ground, so I guess it doesn't count. It scared me to death, though! I can't imagine having an ND in the house. I hope it never happens. I would like to think that it should never happen if you follow the four rules, but human error is responsible for most accidents and an ND is no different. You should be able to drastically improve the odds with the four rules, but we are all human.

klutchless
August 6, 2011, 06:40 AM
Had a 357 go of in my jeep while driving across a field. Lesson learned load one skip one with a hammer mounted firing pin.

Zach S
August 6, 2011, 07:46 AM
Yep. Caught a falling pistol. Only damage was to a subwoofer box, which I still own to remind me of my stupidity.

For clarification, NDs at the range, with your gun pointing towards the backstop, where there was no potential danger to anyone, don't count.
I disagree. If you pull the trigger when you don't mean to, it is an ND.

A mechanical problem with the firearm, such as a slamfire, is an AD.

MrCleanOK
August 6, 2011, 09:09 AM
For clarification, NDs at the range, with your gun pointing towards the backstop, where there was no potential danger to anyone, don't count.

How could unintentionally sending a round down the pipe possibly not count as a negligent discharge? Where you are should have no bearing on this. Mechanical failure is the only alibi that earns an "accidental", and even some of those are preventable.

Loosedhorse
August 6, 2011, 09:59 AM
Had one. No one hurt. Figured, you know, it happens. I was just due. Heck, I'm a gun guy, I handle guns a lot. You know, one in a million chance, but you do it a million times, so what do you expect? An ND is just the mark of an experienced gun guy, kinda like a badge of honor--hey, I'm in the CLUB! Camaraderie! It's cool.

So I kept right on the same. WAY less than a million times later, I had my second ND. No injury but it DESTROYED all the rationalizations listed above. I was causing these: not random chance, not the high number of gun handling instances. It was all me. What I was doing, and what I was not doing. I WAS UNSAFE.

I changed everything. Everything. Got some more training. I am now a certified instructor, but what has really changed are my routines...and my attitude! No NDs since, and I've been an instructor for over a decade now.

(Just to be clear: in my first paragraph, all sentences after the second one are FALSE rationalizations! It just took me another ND to figure that out. :banghead:)

scaatylobo
August 6, 2011, 10:17 AM
First was a 1911 that I was carrying in condition 2,trying to put it in that condition with oily hands - hole in floor.

Next was checking 'indexing' of hand loads of Charter arms bulldog,hole in nightstand.

Both were well over 30 years ago and I did learn that they can happen.

I became LEO afterwards and am SO much safer due to lessons learned.

duns
August 6, 2011, 10:18 AM
How could unintentionally sending a round down the pipe possibly not count as a negligent discharge? Where you are should have no bearing on this. Mechanical failure is the only alibi that earns an "accidental", and even some of those are preventable.My reasoning was that when you are learning to shoot, you may make mistakes such as a double tap in the direction of the paper target when you only wanted to fire once. I saw these as part of the learning process and not negligent. You are welcome to disagree and I'm not saying you are wrong. The important thing is that we should know how terms are defined. This poll will answer the question of how many people had NDs other than in the context of training with the gun pointing in a safe direction. A poll phrased the way you would like it would answer a slightly different question.

Sky
August 6, 2011, 10:45 AM
Familiarity sometimes infringes on caution. Have not had one but every time I handle a gun, even if it is to clean or take out of a range bag, I am not paranoid but very cognizant that I can mess up or the gun being cocked and locked or supposedly empty can still do something I do not want it to. Some of my weapons stay chambered and ready to fire and some do not. I guess I am to old to remember which are which so I treat all of them as if they are ready to go off.......

SlamFire1
August 6, 2011, 11:00 AM
Yes, and with M1911's.

I was following the advice of Bill Wilson, in his book "The Combat 45 Automatic", Bill Wilson recommends holding the trigger back as you chamber a round from a new magazine. Basically hold trigger, punch slide release. Bill Wilson claimed it would protect the sear surfaces of the trigger by engaging the disconnector.

Well guess who got out of sequence a couple of times? Me. I punched the slide release and pulled the trigger. Whoops. Lucky I was at the range with the muzzle pointed down range. Only scared me.

You can practice a movement many times and yet still get it wrong.

I now just punch the slide release. Holding the trigger back will just cause problems.

Too_Pure
August 6, 2011, 11:24 AM
My reasoning was that when you are learning to shoot, you may make mistakes such as a double tap in the direction of the paper target when you only wanted to fire once. I saw these as part of the learning process and not negligent. You are welcome to disagree and I'm not saying you are wrong. The important thing is that we should know how terms are defined. This poll will answer the question of how many people had NDs other than in the context of training with the gun pointing in a safe direction. A poll phrased the way you would like it would answer a slightly different question.

This happened to me, too. It shows the useful redundancy of the rules. While the gun was pointed downrange, and my finger was off the trigger until ready to shoot, it happened before I was ready because I didn't appreciate just how light the trigger really was. Totally freaked me out and gave me an even more healthy respect for how to handle a gun. It also convinced me that a light trigger is not the best for a defensive gun, for me.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

chris in va
August 6, 2011, 11:26 AM
I handed a friend my CZ carbine and forgot the set trigger was activated. He brushed against the trigger and it fired into the sky about 3' from my head. Dumbest thing I've ever done.

ExMachina
August 6, 2011, 12:07 PM
For clarification, NDs at the range, with your gun pointing towards the backstop, where there was no potential danger to anyone, don't count.

you seem to be saying that there are "safe" ND's that don't count. i don't buy this--if the gun goes BANG anytime the shooter doesn't mean it to, then it is potentially dangerous and the shooter should be humbled, not reassured that it didn't actually represent a lapse in safe handling.

481
August 6, 2011, 12:10 PM
As of yet, no and hopefully never.

I've been shooting since I was 10 and whenever I pick up a firearm, my Dad's words to me each time we'd shoot always run through my mind-

"Be mindful whenever you handle a gun 'cause they are more dangerous than the most poisonous snake and a lot less forgiving of carelessness; a moment of inattention could be your last."


It is a simple thought, but has served me well in the 30-some plus years since then.

Mike1234567
August 6, 2011, 12:23 PM
I have a Kel-Tec P-11 which is a DAO with no drop safety. I lightened the trigger spring and, subsequently, the firing pin spring. I have a side clip so I can slip the gun in my front pocket using the upper seam to hold it in place. I was sitting for awhile and the gun worked its way upward without me noticing. When I got up and walked about 3 feet the pistol dropped muzzle-first onto the hard tile/concrete floor and discharged making a 3 inch hole in the tile. My dog was only a couple feet away from me but neither of us were hurt, thank God. I did feel some tiny shrapnel graze past my right palm and lower arm as they shot their way to the ceiling in which they stuck. I don't know if a stock firing pin spring would have prevented the ND or not but it didn't help. I was very sleep deprived, tired, and a bit ill... but that's NO EXCUSE!!

Other than constantly berating myself even to this day I changed two things. 1) I no longer carry a firearm while I'm tired or sleepy. 2) I no longer carry with a round in a DAO chamber unless the gun has a drop safety and/or a thumb safety.

duns
August 6, 2011, 12:33 PM
you seem to be saying that there are "safe" ND's that don't count. i don't buy this--if the gun goes BANG anytime the shooter doesn't mean it to, then it is potentially dangerous and the shooter should be humbled, not reassured that it didn't actually represent a lapse in safe handling.I don't disagree but for the purpose of this poll, please disregard inadvertent discharges when training at the range with the gun pointing in a safe direction. There is a fuzzy line between an ND and an AD and I just wanted to draw a clear line, so that we would know that the poll reflects unquestionable NDs.

Swiftyjuan
August 6, 2011, 12:35 PM
I had just loaded my 12 guage house gun and chambered a round; the gun slipped and I tried to catch it. The gun was pointed at a window that had open fields behind it, but a small 6" square pane of glass disappeared from the window, and I couldn't hear for about 20 minutes!

BFC
August 6, 2011, 01:02 PM
You should have added "Not yet" to the poll. The day I saw one my CQB instructor at Bragg have one (he was a former D-boy, nobody got hurt) I figured it could happen to any of us. So I when ask I always answer not yet.

axxxel
August 6, 2011, 01:17 PM
Had a 357 go of in my jeep while driving across a field. Lesson learned load one skip one with a hammer mounted firing pin.
1)You handed someone else a loaded weapon

2) Whoever received it didn't quite keep trigger discipline

Bad things happen, glad you got out of there in one piece. Your story illustrates how these accidents usually require on or more rules to be broken simultaneously to cause a risky situation.

I've broken the rules and thought to myself "I'm a lucky guy not to have had an ND now", but so far I haven't had an ND.

EddieNFL
August 6, 2011, 02:49 PM
But it was at the range and hit the ground, so I guess it doesn't count.

Did you shout, DO OVER?"

My rationalization was that when you are learning to shoot, you may make mistakes such as a double tap in the direction of the paper target when you only wanted to fire once.

Fixed it.

"There was no one coming when I ran through the red light, so it doesn't count, Officer."

Inebriated
August 6, 2011, 03:04 PM
Quote:
But it was at the range and hit the ground, so I guess it doesn't count.
Did you shout, DO OVER?"

Quote:
My rationalization was that when you are learning to shoot, you may make mistakes such as a double tap in the direction of the paper target when you only wanted to fire once.
Fixed it.

"There was no one coming when I ran through the red light, so it doesn't count, Officer."

It's been covered man, let it go.


I've not had an ND and expect not to... The safety rules are there to follow, so I follow 'em. Safety check, finger out of trigger guard, muzzle away from every one, etc.

Carter
August 6, 2011, 03:25 PM
I've never had one. The first time I shot a SA revolver I lined up my sights to the target area and moved my finger to the trigger guard and accidentally fired it, but according to your definition that doesn't count.

I always safety check my firearms before I pull the trigger. My handguns are almost always loaded so I just assume they are until I determine otherwise.

To be honest though, when all I had was rifles I was a little lax with my gun safety. As soon as I got my ccw it all kind of clicked with me, actually having a loaded gun around 24/7. Especially keeping your finger out of the trigger guard.

CHEVELLE427
August 6, 2011, 03:32 PM
my only discharge for now have been the ones where my finger was on the bang switch and was meant to do so :rolleyes:

keep your booger hook off the bang switch and all will be / should be fine;)

Arkansas Paul
August 6, 2011, 03:40 PM
My ND happened when I was a stupid teenager. It was a Ruger MK2 Target and it was in my pocket when I did not observe the rule where you keep your finger off the trigger. The only damage was a thin red line down my thigh where the bullet burned it, and of course a lot of embarrassment.

303tom
August 6, 2011, 03:42 PM
I am going to brag , because it can happen to anyone , but I have never had a ND.

EddieNFL
August 6, 2011, 04:28 PM
It's been covered man, let it go.


I'm offended that you are offended.

CraigC
August 6, 2011, 04:32 PM
I was trying to fully seat a percussion cap on my 1860 replica and my thumb slipped off the hammer. Almost shot the AC unit outside the basement door.


I've not had an ND and expect not to... The safety rules are there to follow, so I follow 'em. Safety check, finger out of trigger guard, muzzle away from every one, etc.
Yep, that's what everyone thinks.....before it happens. Do enough shooting and eventually it WILL happen.

Mike1234567
August 6, 2011, 04:33 PM
I'm offended that you are offended.

I'm offended that you're offended that he's offended. And to end this now... I'm offended to INFINITY!!

EddieNFL
August 6, 2011, 07:29 PM
I'm offended that you're offended that he's offended. And to end this now... I'm offended to INFINITY!!
My granddaughter says infinity plus one.

bergmen
August 6, 2011, 08:24 PM
No, not in over fifty years of hunting and shooting. My Dad, my brother, my two sons, my daughter, my wife - never an ND.

Dan

Stevie-Ray
August 6, 2011, 09:57 PM
When I worked driving a hilo, I was told, "There's only 2 kinds of people that drive hilo in area 1, those that have dropped 6 ft racks and those that are going to." Wrong, there are now 3 kinds, including those that never dropped a rack. I hope I can continue to be so successful, but at something so much more important.

joeq
August 6, 2011, 10:07 PM
Seriously, 29 of 45 have had a ND? That's way higher than I would have expected. I personally don't know anyone that has had a ND.

joeq
August 6, 2011, 10:11 PM
I cocked my Judge before I had it pointed at the target and it went off. That trigger is pretty light with the hammer back! But it was at the range and hit the ground, so I guess it doesn't count.

It doesn't count? It went off before you had it on target because you pulled the trigger. Guns generally fire when the trigger is pulled.

Mike1234567
August 6, 2011, 10:48 PM
Seriously, 29 of 45 have had a ND? That's way higher than I would have expected. I personally don't know anyone that has had a ND.
I'm sure the numbers are skewed... probably a high percentage of those who have had a ND responded but not that many who haven't.

DeepSouth
August 6, 2011, 11:17 PM
Nope.............not yet!:what:

ExMachina
August 6, 2011, 11:41 PM
Seriously, 29 of 45 have had a ND? That's way higher than I would have expected. I personally don't know anyone that has had a ND.

go to a public shooting range and watch for folks to let a round go waaaaay before they intend to. happens a lot. don't believe that?--just count the number of holes in the ceiling :what:. more importantly, there's no reason to think that bad gun handling habits like that would merely be left on the firing line.

orionengnr
August 6, 2011, 11:59 PM
Seriously, 29 of 45 have had a ND? That's way higher than I would have expected. I personally don't know anyone that has had a ND.
Actually, I suspect that there are quite a few who have but will not admit it. And others will find a way to "rationalize" theirs and make it a non-occurence.

I have never taken a poll of my friends and contemporaries (~55 y.o. men who have been shooting >30 years.)

Mine was almost 30 years ago, but I never faced up and 'fessed up to mine until recently. It's certainly not something I'm proud of.

But I thank God for the internet--these days any new shooter can read of and learn from the mistakes of many of us who never had any formal instruction, and who never heard of "Four Rules" until ten years ago.

Mike1234567
August 7, 2011, 12:08 AM
Not to make folly of this but... firearms are tools like any other. We make mistakes with tools. How many of us have hit our thumbs with a hammer? And we'd NEVER do that intentionally, would we? Especially not more than once in a lifetime. I'm not saying we should treat a firearm with the same care as a hammer. I'm just saying thumbs get hammered.

ExMachina
August 7, 2011, 12:21 AM
Not to make folly of this but... firearms are tools like any other. We make mistakes with tools. How many of us have hit our thumbs with a hammer? And we'd NEVER do that intentionally, would we? Especially not more than once in a lifetime. I'm not saying we should treat a firearm with the same care as a hammer. I'm just saying thumbs get hammered.

this is such a great point. ND's are a function of time and exposure--the older you are and the more you practice, the more likely you are to have had one.

the good news is that the canonical gun safety rules are there so that when we DO make that mistake with a gun, we have three levels of redundant safeguards there to mitigate the consequences.

OkieGentleman
August 7, 2011, 12:41 AM
Yes!

JoeMal
August 7, 2011, 12:44 AM
Nope

Arkansas Paul
August 7, 2011, 01:34 AM
Seriously, 29 of 45 have had a ND? That's way higher than I would have expected. I personally don't know anyone that has had a ND.


Maybe you don't. And maybe you just don't know anybody that has owned up to having one.
I figured it would be about 50/50 myself. And as has already been said, it's probably a little higher than usual because people who have had them are responding more. I know I will share mine with anyone in the hopes that it may make someone think about what not to do. I was lucky once. You may not be.

dmlehto
August 7, 2011, 02:21 AM
nope. im either lucky or paranoid. probably both.

Pegwedge
August 7, 2011, 02:51 AM
I feel like I've jinxed myself by answering no to this poll. Not that I'm superstitious or anything... I've been very lucky since I've been handling guns. I was saved by a thumb safety though once when I grabbed for a falling gun.

cwp3420
August 7, 2011, 04:10 AM
Been shooting lots of stuff in my last 50 years of shooting, starting with my dad's .45 ACP, bb guns, pellet guns, etc. Moved to the Army, shot .45ACP pistols, M3A1 grease guns, and 105mm main tank guns. Then carried for the U.S. Government Law Enforcement Officer, (U.S. Border Patrol, INS Criminal Investigator, then DHS and became an ICE Senior Special Agent. In 38 years I can honestly say that I have never had an AD. May have one tomorrow, but thank God not yet.

MyGreenGuns
August 7, 2011, 06:20 AM
I recently posted a story "ND could have killed me" in a similar forum.
(http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?p=7476827#post7476827)

Still no ND here. When I read that post, I wondered "How many?" Totally shocked!

zdc1775
August 7, 2011, 07:09 AM
I haven't had one so far but I'm young so you could say its lack of experience. I do try and always follow all the gun safety rules but of course everyone has moments of pure stupidity.

As a side note I have had an approximately 20 round AD with an M-249 when the sear broke.

northark147
August 7, 2011, 08:36 AM
I finally had one a few months ago. It was completely my fault, no way to rationalize how i wasn't doing anything wrong to make it happen. Only providing details so maybe another will learn from my mistake without having to make it themselves.

It was the day I got my new Ruger LC9. Instead of making up some dummy rounds and loading a magazine with them and leaving the loaded magazine somewhere else, I was dry firing it in my living room. They have a magazine safety so I was ejecting the magazine, cocking it, re inserting the magazine, the dry firing. Needless to say eventually I didn't drop the magazine. KaBoom scared me half to death, but since I was aiming at my old particle board desk with boxes of book under it just in case I ever did have an accident noone was hurt. I got a good embarrassment out of it and my gf and best friend got a good laugh out of it.

EddieNFL
August 7, 2011, 09:12 AM
I'm sure the numbers are skewed... probably a high percentage of those who have had a ND responded but not that many who haven't.
And some may have voted no because they considered it an "accidental" discharge.

Until I read this thread I thought I had experienced an ND, but it didn't count.

Arkansas Paul
August 7, 2011, 03:32 PM
Firearms are not only subject to human error like all tools are but also like all tools they are subject to malfunction all on their own.


That's the difference between a AD and a ND.

longhair75
August 7, 2011, 09:09 PM
For the life of me, I do not remember why I thought it would be a good idea to lower the hammer on a live round in a Browning HiPower. I was alone in the basement, and the weapon was pointed in a safe direction, but the hammer slipped out from under my thumb, and the round ended up in the sop of my piano.

Onmilo
August 8, 2011, 12:08 AM
40 some years around guns, I've had a few.
Luckily, no one was ever hurt.

GLOOB
August 8, 2011, 05:00 AM
For clarification, NDs at the range, with your gun pointing towards the backstop, where there was no potential danger to anyone, don't count.
I disagree. If you pull the trigger when you don't mean to, it is an ND.

Ahh, but you can pull the trigger intentionally at a firing range without being 100% sure of the outcome. E.g., did I fire this revolver 5 times or 6 times? One more pull just to be sure. If it goes bang, no harm no foul. Not that I've ever done that, but I've watched others do it. They'll cock the hammer, then stop and ask "oh, that was 6 shots, wasn't it?"

My response, "pull the trigger and find out."

I wouldn't count that as an ND if they aimed it, properly, and it went bang.

Also I wouldn't count it if they have the gun on target before they put their finger on the trigger, and yet the gun goes off before they expected it. Esp for firing a particular gun for the first time. That's what the rules are for.

jcgrant2
August 8, 2011, 11:45 AM
Only once...and his birthday is next month.

Mike1234567
August 8, 2011, 12:04 PM
^^^ Tell the lad "Happy ND Day" from your buds at THR!!:D

tarosean
August 8, 2011, 12:20 PM
Guess I am the only dumba** to have suffered an injury from a ND/AD...Loaded Jennings 25 in my pocket.. It went off, bullet entered my kneecap traveled just under the skin and came to rest in my ankle. Was 17 at the time I don't recall ever touching the gun...

NM Mountainman
August 8, 2011, 12:52 PM
There have been discussions in the past where some shooters referred to AD's (accidental discharges.) This is usually challenged by someone who says that "accidents" are basically caused by someone failing to follow gun safety rules, so these events should be labelled as ND's. Based on some of the stories I have heard, and the few ND's I have witnessed, I think I would refer to a lot of them as NDE's (near death experiences)

I've been involved in the shooting sports for more than 55 years, and my occasional but rare lapses in the observation of the safety rules have yet to result in an ND. But I've seen enough close calls to remind myself frequently to avoid slipping into an attitude of complacency or inattention.

we are not amused
August 8, 2011, 01:10 PM
With my brothers in our driveway, shooting handguns, I pulled out my C96 Mauser, which I hadn't fired for at least two years, while attempting to load it, I found out the hard way it was already loaded. Fortunately it was pointed in a safe direction, (generally downrange), but it scared the heck out of me!:what: When I got home I immediately checked ALL of my guns to make sure they were empty, to this day, I still have no idea why I left that gun loaded, when I put it up.

we are not amused
August 8, 2011, 01:19 PM
I'm sure the numbers are skewed... probably a high percentage of those who have had a ND responded but not that many who haven't.
And perhaps the number really is that high! I hope not, but a lot of people may not admit it to someone they know personally:o, but are willing to share on an anonymous forum board.

Mike1234567
August 8, 2011, 01:29 PM
SIDE NOTE: I wonder if the BATFE and ban 'em groups will use the data in threads like this to support their agendas... e.g. "Guns are too dangerous to be owned by the average Joe and Joline".

Dogguy
August 8, 2011, 04:08 PM
Guns are supposed to be dangerous.

Like the story on horses: Never been a horse that can't be rode or a cowboy that can't be throwed.

Mike1234567
August 8, 2011, 04:10 PM
^^^ I know. That wasn't my point.;):)

FullEffect1911
August 9, 2011, 11:56 AM
Because of your clarification I voted no.

If you didn't put that note in there I did have a ND dropping the hammer on a single six (no transfer bar safety type), it was pointing downrange with everyone behind the firing line so no harm was done. Still makes me appreciate modern single action revolvers more and even the cross bolt safety on marlin lever actions. :what:

CoRoMo
August 9, 2011, 12:06 PM
For clarification, NDs at the range, with your gun pointing towards the backstop, where there was no potential danger to anyone, don't count.
Crap. Change my vote to 'NO' then.

Mike1234567
August 9, 2011, 12:09 PM
Crap. Change my vote to 'NO' then.
Too late. As one of our wonderful previous presidents would say, "Yoo already incriminiminimated yerself".:evil:

neilsmth
August 9, 2011, 04:45 PM
Haven't had the old nocturnal dis......wait, what? Never mind.

Omaney
August 9, 2011, 05:05 PM
I have been "responsible" for a ND. I have witnessed a few as well. I left the hole in my wall as a reminder for a few months before I patched it.

Superdave70_02
August 9, 2011, 06:20 PM
I'm in the not yet category. I have witnessed 3. A .45 in a house is deafening.

Vanzpp
August 9, 2011, 06:48 PM
I've been carrying daily for about 10 years and I've never had a ND. It's my personal goal to go to my grave without ever having one. If I can do that and have my 4 year old daughter grow into a happy, healthy adult, I'll die a happy man.

Dr_2_B
August 10, 2011, 09:12 AM
I have carried daily for 18 years. I have never had one but I do not condemn those who have had one. I am learning from reading this forum how easy it is to make a mistake - even for those very experienced. I believe it was Benjamin Franklin who talked about 'doubting one's own fallibility.' When I read threads like this I try to make the commitment to rededicate myself to safety.

Maia007
August 11, 2011, 12:15 AM
Sure, I'll admit it. Twice. Both times way back years ago when I really thought that "I'll never make a mistake". Both involved simple violations of the basic rules and momentary lapses of attention.

Not everyone of us was privileged in receiving a good education from a caring mentor. Some of us just learned as we went.

Am I of the opinion that "I'll never make a mistake"? Not anymore. Frankly, I am grateful that those mistakes happened. I learned. Hopefully, I'll never forget.

ET
August 11, 2011, 02:26 PM
Yes, I was 13 years old. My brother & his friend & I were going shooting down by the creek that ran behind our house. My brother handed a revolver to me to carry. He never said what condition the gun was in & I assumed it was empty. I aimed it at a tree and pulled the trigger while we were walking down to the creek. To everybody's surprise it went bang. :eek: We all looked at each other and then the dog to see if everybody was OK. We were all ok, BUT now I see where I could just as easily have aimed the gun at the dog or my brother and pulled the trigger. By the grace of God I aimed at a tree instead of a living being (my apologies to the Arbor Day Foundation:uhoh:). Since that day I have always assumed that every gun I ever encounter is loaded, even if half of it's parts were missing or the barrel was welded shut.

ET
August 11, 2011, 02:35 PM
When I got home I immediately checked ALL of my guns to make sure they were empty, to this day, I still have no idea why I left that gun loaded, when I put it up.

Humm, I put up all of my guns with ammo in them. I keep my guns in my safe with ammo in the magazine but not in the chamber. If I am carrying a gun then I keep one in the chamber. I figure that if a trigger gets pulled by someone who is removing a gun from mysafe that I would rather not have it discharge. I don't worry about a gun I'm carrying since it is in my control. If I'm storing a revolver then I keep the next chamber unloaded since that is the one that comes up when the trigger is pulled and the cylinder rotates. I pretty much know what to expect when I pull a gun out of the safe, yet I still treat them as if a round was loaded in the chamber, since it could possibly have been tampered with by someone else or me at some point in time.

JayPee
August 11, 2011, 05:03 PM
For a number of years, my signature on several gun forums was:

"An unintended discharge has a lot in common with a midair collision."

Nuf sed.

No I've never had an ND.

JP

9mmforMe
August 12, 2011, 01:26 AM
Yeah...I had a Ruger Security six wheelie and didn't notice that one .357 round that got caught under the extractor when I unloaded. So I was just gonna dry fire it a few times...click, click, boom!! Thank goodness I always point my handguns in a safe direction (safe being a relative term) and out the window it went and into a tree in the back yard.

Took out an 11 pointer too!! :evil: honest...no really...ok...I'm a liar. :neener:

If you enjoyed reading about "Have you ever had an ND?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!