Ruger LCR Durability


PDA






USBP1969
August 6, 2011, 04:57 PM
Howdy.

Searched this forum, but wasn't able to find any threads / posts in regards to this subject.

I know it's a new design, so there probably hasn't been a lot of ammunition shot through them yet.

I have been carrying Air Weight S&W's since I retired in 2004, but practice at the range is not what I would call fun. (Yeah I know - your getting a reading on the "Wimpometer.")

The Hogue "Tamer" grips on the LCR look like they would be a great asset in reduction of perceived recoil, so I thought I'd ask.

Thanks
-kent

If you enjoyed reading about "Ruger LCR Durability" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Han Tzu
August 6, 2011, 08:07 PM
The Hogue grips are nice. The recoil on my LCR 357 with full house loads stings my hand. Recoil on less powerful rounds is light.

I can't speak personally to the durability. I have shot about 400 rounds total of 38, 38 +p, and 357 through it. My research before purchasing the LCR led me to believe the gun would be durable over its lifetime.

Pegwedge
August 6, 2011, 08:31 PM
I shot mine for the first time today. I couldn't find any .357s in my small town, so all I had were regular .38s and a few +Ps. I really wanted to see how the recoil was with full power rounds because I plan on carrying it with them. I don't know if it was all in my mind but the +Ps seemed to have less recoil than the regular pressure ones. Compared to the S&W 642, the recoil seemed minimal. I'm really liking the hogue grips.

Before I traded for the LCR, I did my share of research. I haven't seen it myself but I read that some magazine (American Rifleman I think it was) put 10,000+ rounds through a .38 LCR and it still locked up tight and was like straight out of the box. I doubt I'll ever put 5,000 let alone 10,000 rounds through mine but it's nice to know the polymer can stand up to it. I just need to find a good owb cross draw holster for it so if anyone has any recommendations...

USBP1969
August 7, 2011, 12:32 AM
Yes sir, I know of a good one designed by a friend who's favorite gun is an LCR.
http://www.bobmacs.com/EL-CD.htm

-kent

Pegwedge
August 7, 2011, 12:49 AM
That's one good looking holster. That's definitely going on my list. Gonna have to sell another gun to finance it though. :)

USBP1969
August 7, 2011, 10:58 AM
:<)

Skyshot
August 7, 2011, 11:28 AM
I'm very happy with my LCR, Mine is a .38+P only, as I did not care for the .357 recoil. It's very comfortable to shoot with the +P loads and pretty accurate for a snubbie I might add. I also got the nightsite model, I've put a few hundred rounds throug it with no issues, the hogue tamer grips are great!

Bush Pilot
August 7, 2011, 02:26 PM
I've shot close to 5,000 rounds from my LCR in the past 12 months w/o any issues. IIRC there was a "torture test" done with an LCR firing several thousand rounds and no reported problems. I don't remember the exact round count, it was substantial.

jawn
August 7, 2011, 03:03 PM
I've put around 400 rounds through my LCR (.357) in the last two months. No issues so far. Be aware that the .357 model is made of slightly different materials than the .38 special model. I bought the .357 model because of the monolithic frame is made of steel rather than aluminum. It tacks on a few ounces because of it, but it's still a reasonable 17 ounces.

I have shot the 642 and my LCR side by side before, and I will say that .38+Ps in my LCR feel like regular .38s out of the 642. I also think the trigger is better on the LCR than on the 642.

USBP1969
August 7, 2011, 06:04 PM
Thanks for the info gentlemen. Five thousand is a goodly amount and now I know why there is a difference in the two LCR's weight.

How does the point of impact compare to the point of aim for most loads with the LCR?

-kent

Pegwedge
August 7, 2011, 07:18 PM
All of this is just my opinion. I'm not exactly an expert marksman. The manual says to hold at six o'clock. At seven yards, that was way too low for me. Holding dead on, I was shooting about four inches low in about a four inch group. Like I said, I need some practice. I wouldn't doubt I was anticipating the recoil. I only had a box and some extras to shoot and I had to split them with my buddy who was wanting to shoot it. So I didn't get near as much trigger time as I wanted or needed.

I'm going to sit down this week and dryfire it until my finger bleeds to get that trigger control down. I'm also thinking about looking into the bigger front night sight for it. I hear that's the way to go.

USBP1969
August 7, 2011, 08:36 PM
Pegwedge - Please do yourself a favor and put on a 1" Bandaid on your trigger finger in the area where it will come into contact with the trigger. I know it's a good trigger and smooth, but it'll help as you build both strength and smoothness. "No Pain - No Gain" is not a good saying when it comes to practicing one's shooting.

Also, it's best to dry fire while aiming at a light colored blank wall. That way you can focus on the front sight easily. A good drill is to focus on the wall, then transfer that focus to your front sight as you start the trigger pull.

Another very helpful exercise is to imagine that you are pulling the front sight through the rear sight with the trigger. That accomplishes three things with one visualization.
1) Front Sight focus
2) Pulling straight back on the trigger, and;
3) (During Live Fire) Your concentration will be on the task at hand. That is, pulling the trigger straight back while focusing on the front sight.

Grip Pressure: As you aim at the wall (I do hope that the LCR is empty) max out your grip until you hand(s) tremble. Then, back off just a little until the trembling stops and then pull the front sight through the rear as outlined above. This accomplishes several things:
1) It simulates a true gunfight firing grip. (You will be practicing for reality.)
2) It's an isometric exercise and you will become stronger as time goes on. Then, your shake thresh hold will increase. (You will be holding the weapon with a stronger grip without trembling.)
3) (Live Fire) This grip pressure will allow the fastest recoil recovery possible, and will get better (faster) as you become stronger.

Just some old Instructor's thoughts,
-kent

Pegwedge
August 7, 2011, 09:16 PM
Thanks USBP. That looks like some pretty sound advice. I'll use that advice this week and hopefully get to hit the range again next weekend and put it into practice.

bluetopper
August 7, 2011, 11:15 PM
My 38 LCR shoots to point of aim. I can make beer cans dance a jig at 20yds with my cast lead wadcutter reloads.

jawn
August 8, 2011, 12:51 AM
At self-defense distances (10ish yards), my LCR shoots point of aim with pretty much everything.

utahvaughn
August 8, 2011, 01:28 AM
USBP1969's advise ought to be a stickie for all learning shooters.

Remllez
August 8, 2011, 11:34 AM
The frame design, the materials used as well as the Hogues contribute to relatively mild recoil in both calibers. LCR'S have the best out of the box triggers i've ever seen. Ruger seems to be taking the lead as far as overall quality goes.

The LCR is a fine carry gun IWB or on the belt, it shoots self defense POA for me and hasn't shown any appreciable wear through a case or so rounds. I'm an older fellow and can't remember ever wearing out a quality firearm of any configuration. That's not to say none of my guns hasn't broke a part or two, that's not all that uncommon.

I'm of the opinion that for the money the LCR is hard to beat, and if you do have a problem with any Ruger firearm their customer service seem to be very good. Of course it's your money and your decision to make, so take what I say for what it's worth. Good luck with whatever you decide.

USBP1969
August 8, 2011, 11:54 AM
Thanks Utah.

I taught full-time for 15 years of my 33 in the US Border Patrol.

I'm still learning and love to see someone "blossom" from spraying and praying to drilling the target.

-kent

DPris
August 8, 2011, 12:36 PM
No magazine that I'm aware of has put 10,000 rounds through an LCR.
I did see the article most people refer to when they quote that figure, but it only refered to a 10,000-round test, did not say anywhere that they'd done it themselves.

I did a 5300-round .38 test, mostly +P.
The gun held up, but did show frame stretching & barrel/cylinder gap increase at the end.
Still in specs, still shot fine. Sights were off, but at 15 yards (Ruger considers it a 15-yard gun) they weren't TOO far off.
Going beyond that would have increased the stretch. How much & how fast, dunno.
Depends largely on what you shoot in it.

Ruger told me THEY'D done 10,000 through a sample & only wore the rifling.
Denis

USBP1969
August 8, 2011, 01:16 PM
The local gun store has one for rental, but...it has CT grips so there's no way to compare the recoil characteristics, but the POA / POI should be the same as the factory grip.

Trivia: Lately I have been getting a 2 1/2" - 3 1/2" left print at 25 yards with everything I shoot that's fixed sighted. Nothing has changed except my vision (age 69) were my right eye has started to loose it's visual acuity. Had not worn glasses, except for safety and now the best they can correct the master eye is to 20/25.

My left eye has been trying to take over (can't have that), so I'll have to start shooting with prescription glasses. Another variable is that the nearest outdoor range is too far for me to go as a full-time caregiver for my wife. That leaves an indoor range which seems to be getting darker. (probably smoke residue on the lights.)

My agency used to test four of each bid submission (they get ten total of each) with 10,350 rounds. 350 were for breakin and then the 10,000 round test started. Don't know what they do now. (been a while) If the four weapons of that make / model pass, then they are drop tested with a chambered primed casing from six different attitudes on to concrete from 48 inches. If a primed casing fired, they failed.

-kent

jawn
August 8, 2011, 01:25 PM
No magazine that I'm aware of has put 10,000 rounds through an LCR.
I did see the article most people refer to when they quote that figure, but it only refered to a 10,000-round test, did not say anywhere that they'd done it themselves.

I did a 5300-round .38 test, mostly +P.
The gun held up, but did show frame stretching & barrel/cylinder gap increase at the end.
Still in specs, still shot fine. Sights were off, but at 15 yards (Ruger considers it a 15-yard gun) they weren't TOO far off.
Going beyond that would have increased the stretch. How much & how fast, dunno.
Depends largely on what you shoot in it.

Ruger told me THEY'D done 10,000 through a sample & only wore the rifling.
Denis
I'm always wary of aluminum framed guns, mostly because of how they wear through high-round counts. I went with the LCR in .357 primarily for that reason.

DPris
August 8, 2011, 01:28 PM
And, in my hand, the rubber grip tore skin & tore a shooting glove.
I had to change to a thumb-on-top-of-frame point & shoot hold for the bulk of the testing.
Not highly accurate, but I could do reasonably well at 7 yards.

Recoil seems to vary from shooter to shooter, with +Ps it just flat tore up my hand.
And, I'm not particularly recoil sensitive, I've fired a .460 Mag S&W snub one-handed without either losing the gun or drawing blood :)
Denis

DPris
August 8, 2011, 01:56 PM
Ruger didn't build the .38 LCR for regular IPSC use, it was intended to be carried much more than fired.
Given that, its lifespan depends on how much you fire it & what you run through it.

Low-pressured lead will obviously cause less wear & frame stretch than hi-pressured jacketed loads.

I was actually surprised the test sample held up, I honestly had expected it to fail.
While I wouldn't shoot one regularly, I also would not dismiss the gun out of hand as a backup or occasional primary defensive piece.

Fired occasionally, and/or with low-pressure loads, it should hold up for many years.
5,000 rounds a year with +Ps, nope. Not what it was designed for.
Denis

EVIL
August 8, 2011, 04:00 PM
This is a great thread guys, I have been tossing around the idea of an LCR crossdraw as a BUG when I carry my SP101 - especially since it uses the same, (J-Frame) speed loaders. I see it as as a gun that is little loved for aesthetics but highly functional.

bluetopper
August 8, 2011, 11:23 PM
The LCR is the best carry firearm I know of for a novice woman shooter. Wonderful light trigger pull, no slide to pull back, no safety lever to have to manipulate, no not knowing if there's on in the chamber.....and very very light to carry. I'm not a Ruger man, but Ruger hit a homer with the LCR.

scottishclaymore
August 9, 2011, 01:35 AM
OK, so I'm on the market for a snub that can hold up to weekly shooting of 100 rounds or so. Given thought to the LCR, another J-Frame, or possibly the SP101. Weight isn't as much a consideration as I am a big guy and carry a 3" GP100 most days. Is the LCR what I'm looking for or do I need to go for something that can handle more in the way of regular use?

jawn
August 9, 2011, 02:00 AM
The LCR in .357 is mostly steel (the cylinder is actually made of the same steel they use on their .454 Casulls), and I do bring mine to the range every time that I go. That said, the SP101 sounds more like what you need. The primary thing that stopped me from getting the SP101 was weight, so if that's not a consideration for you, that's what I recommend. While I really like the trigger on my LCR and the grip, the SP101 just instills a confidence in how overbuilt it is.

I stay away from aluminum on anything that I plan on shooting a lot. That steered me away from many of the J-Frames and the LCR in .38. That's just me. Plenty of people get a lot of life out of these aluminum framed snubs, but for my peace of mind, I prefer steel.

DPris
August 9, 2011, 03:16 AM
Scott,
You should be able to make a decision based on what I posted above.

A steady program of +P in the .38 version WILL stretch the frame.
I have no experience with the .357 LCR, and zero interest in it. I also can't imagine anybody shooting the magnum version recreationally.

If you go .38, it'll hold up longer with light loads. If you shoot a hundred +P a week, you'll wear the .38 version out quicker, and I wouldn't expect it to go very far beyond 10,000 rounds. At that point, I imagine Ruger could rebuild the gun using a new alloy frame & probably a new barrel, but it wouldn't be on their dime.

If you go .357, I'd imagine (even with its different frame material) that stretching will eventually occur. At what point I wouldn't guess.

For regular weekly shooting, the SP would hold up much longer, it's simply a stronger gun built more for shooting.
The LCR is not a fragile "throwaway" gun, but it does have its limitations.
Denis

stinger 327
August 9, 2011, 04:13 AM
I shot mine for the first time today. I couldn't find any .357s in my small town, so all I had were regular .38s and a few +Ps. I really wanted to see how the recoil was with full power rounds because I plan on carrying it with them. I don't know if it was all in my mind but the +Ps seemed to have less recoil than the regular pressure ones. Compared to the S&W 642, the recoil seemed minimal. I'm really liking the hogue grips.

Before I traded for the LCR, I did my share of research. I haven't seen it myself but I read that some magazine (American Rifleman I think it was) put 10,000+ rounds through a .38 LCR and it still locked up tight and was like straight out of the box. I doubt I'll ever put 5,000 let alone 10,000 rounds through mine but it's nice to know the polymer can stand up to it. I just need to find a good owb cross draw holster for it so if anyone has any recommendations...
I have a LCR in .38 with night sights and no matter what .38 load I put in from +P load to regular .38 special loads they all kicked like hell and hurt my hand. It was the worst with the 158 Buffalo Bore load. Not comfortable to shoot especially since it leaves the web of your hand swollen.

USBP1969
August 9, 2011, 11:16 AM
FWIW - I fired 50 rounds last Friday through three different S&W 442's. It was a mix of 130 Federal FMC, 130 grain Winchester PDX-1 and Speer 135 Gold Dot JHP.

I was attempting to find out if there was a POA /POI shift at 25 yards. (There was a 2 1/2 - 3 1/2" shift to the left with all three weapons.:confused: )

Bottom line is that today (the following Tuesday) the web of my shooting hand is still very sore.

I was quite surprised as the only other weapon that ever did that to me was a Ruger Redhawk 5 1/5" .44 Magnum firing Remington 240 grain JHP loads with stock wood grips.

Now, you are probably getting a reading on your "Wimpometer," but in my defense I can truly say that because of my employment, I have fired is excess of a million rounds of center fire handgun ammo, and up to now only the Redhawk had nailed me.

I was hoping that the Hogue "Tamer" grips would make a difference when firing a 16 oz. small frame handgun, but perhaps not.

-kent

ilmonster
August 9, 2011, 02:29 PM
I too am looking for a CCW piece as we finally got concealed carry here in WI. I initially tried a LCR in .38 spcl with Crimson Trace grips, and it did hurt to shoot (and I was shooting .38 158 gr. RN, not +P). Last weekend I shot the LCR in .357 with std. Hogue Tamer grips shooting .38 PMC 130 gr. FMJ rounds, and it was comfortable to shoot. Not sure if it was the grips, the extra 4 oz.'s of weight or both. I am now looking to purchase an LCR .357 (which I'll only shoot .38 and .38 +P rounds from )! Now just need a OWB holster.

I'm also not recoil sensative (I think) as I have a 4 5/8" SuperBlackhawk that I shoot .44 mag and .44 spcl's out of (mostly Spcl's), a GP-100 through which .357 loads are downright pleasant, etc. Actually, the most painful gun I've shot was a S&W 360PD which weighs 11 oz.'s. With 125 gr. .357 loads I thought I may have broken a bone in my hand. Only shot three rounds. Never again!

p.s. both LCR's shot to point of aim at 20 and 30 ft. respectively. Got all rounds within a fist sized group

stinger 327
August 10, 2011, 02:35 AM
FWIW - I fired 50 rounds last Friday through three different S&W 442's. It was a mix of 130 Federal FMC, 130 grain Winchester PDX-1 and Speer 135 Gold Dot JHP.

I was attempting to find out if there was a POA /POI shift at 25 yards. (There was a 2 1/2 - 3 1/2" shift to the left with all three weapons.:confused: )

Bottom line is that today (the following Tuesday) the web of my shooting hand is still very sore.

I was quite surprised as the only other weapon that ever did that to me was a Ruger Redhawk 5 1/5" .44 Magnum firing Remington 240 grain JHP loads with stock wood grips.

Now, you are probably getting a reading on your "Wimpometer," but in my defense I can truly say that because of my employment, I have fired is excess of a million rounds of center fire handgun ammo, and up to now only the Redhawk had nailed me.

I was hoping that the Hogue "Tamer" grips would make a difference when firing a 16 oz. small frame handgun, but perhaps not.

-kent
I shot all of the above loads you mentioned and more including Hornady, Corbon, Speer and it didn't make a difference they all kicked real hard. But like I said the 158 grain Buffalo Bore was the worst kicking and probably the most powerful load there.

USBP1969
August 10, 2011, 11:18 AM
Amen to the recoil.

FWIW, I see that Buffalo Bore has come out with a Full Wadcutter 150 grain at 850+ fps in a flash suppressed .38 Special. Still gonna kick since the 135 gold Dot is about that velocity and it's 135 grains in weight. Still, IMO it's a very good idea.

Trivia: A good friend and I used to preach that the full wadcutter was the "Cat's Meow." as a non pre-fragmented defense projectile. (He actually tested them on people, unofficially.)

Someone years ago someone loaned me a book that I wish I could find now to purchase. It was written by a fluid engineer with access to computers before the Personal Computer came on the scene. He studied ballistic gelatin results as compared to his computer projections and came up with a modification of Julian Hatcher's "Nose Configuration Factor" (NCF) used in his "Relative Stopping Power" formula. (mass x velocity x cross-sectonal area x nose configuration factor) The problem was that Mr. Hatcher gave all bullet shapes other than RNL and Full Metal Jacketed Round Nose a 1.25 NCF. (FMCRN round nose was .9 and RNL was 1.0)

The fluid engineer believed in Hatcher's formula except for the NCF, hence the testing. Here, from memory are the results:

-Round Node Lead = 1.0 (Baseline)
-Round nose FMC = 1.0
-SWC = 1.5
-Pointed cone = 1.6 (Winchester Metal Piercer .38 & .357)
-Full Wadcutter = 3.35 (Might have been 3.5 - been a while)

He also tried predicting with the computer model how hollowpoints would perform and found a way to do it based on the gelatin testing. Here's the interesting part. The best hollowpoint performed slightly less well than than the full wadcutter!!

I carry Magsafe Defender ammunition at home and away from home. I have a lot of faith in that round, except for penetration through anything substantial, and it's recoil is less that the +P Speer and Winchester loads. It does print about 12" low at 25 yards though.

-kent

stinger 327
August 10, 2011, 12:38 PM
Amen to the recoil.

FWIW, I see that Buffalo Bore has come out with a Full Wadcutter 150 grain at 850+ fps in a flash suppressed .38 Special. Still gonna kick since the 135 gold Dot is about that velocity and it's 135 grains in weight. Still, IMO it's a very good idea.

Trivia: A good friend and I used to preach that the full wadcutter was the "Cat's Meow." as a non pre-fragmented defense projectile. (He actually tested them on people, unofficially.)

Someone years ago someone loaned me a book that I wish I could find now to purchase. It was written by a fluid engineer with access to computers before the Personal Computer came on the scene. He studied ballistic gelatin results as compared to his computer projections and came up with a modification of Julian Hatcher's "Nose Configuration Factor" (NCF) used in his "Relative Stopping Power" formula. (mass x velocity x cross-sectonal area x nose configuration factor) The problem was that Mr. Hatcher gave all bullet shapes other than RNL and Full Metal Jacketed Round Nose a 1.25 NCF. (FMCRN round nose was .9 and RNL was 1.0)

The fluid engineer believed in Hatcher's formula except for the NCF, hence the testing. Here, from memory are the results:

-Round Node Lead = 1.0 (Baseline)
-Round nose FMC = 1.0
-SWC = 1.5
-Pointed cone = 1.6 (Winchester Metal Piercer .38 & .357)
-Full Wadcutter = 3.35 (Might have been 3.5 - been a while)

He also tried predicting with the computer model how hollowpoints would perform and found a way to do it based on the gelatin testing. Here's the interesting part. The best hollowpoint performed slightly less well than than the full wadcutter!!

I carry Magsafe Defender ammunition at home and away from home. I have a lot of faith in that round, except for penetration through anything substantial, and it's recoil is less that the +P Speer and Winchester loads. It does print about 12" low at 25 yards though.

-kent
Speer Gold Dot makes a few different loads in different calibers that are made for short barrel guns. .38 is one of them.

ilmonster
August 10, 2011, 12:46 PM
When I get the .357 LCR, I want to try both the Speer GD 135gr. +P for short barrel guns and the std. pressure Federal 125gr. Nyclad as personal protection load options. The Speer had a very good track record (as Mas Ayoob has confirmed in his writings), and I've read positive reviews of the Nyclad as a std. pressure option.

stinger 327
August 10, 2011, 12:46 PM
OK, so I'm on the market for a snub that can hold up to weekly shooting of 100 rounds or so. Given thought to the LCR, another J-Frame, or possibly the SP101. Weight isn't as much a consideration as I am a big guy and carry a 3" GP100 most days. Is the LCR what I'm looking for or do I need to go for something that can handle more in the way of regular use?
The SP101 is a very robust little 5 shot .357. It will hold up to your daily shooting needs plus you can always use .38 loads in it. I put .357 loads
To that .357 LCR must be a real kicker as I find my .38 +P LCR to be very uncomfortable to shoot. I can't imagine what that .357 LCR recoil will be like.

stinger 327
August 10, 2011, 12:48 PM
I too am looking for a CCW piece as we finally got concealed carry here in WI. I initially tried a LCR in .38 spcl with Crimson Trace grips, and it did hurt to shoot (and I was shooting .38 158 gr. RN, not +P). Last weekend I shot the LCR in .357 with std. Hogue Tamer grips shooting .38 PMC 130 gr. FMJ rounds, and it was comfortable to shoot. Not sure if it was the grips, the extra 4 oz.'s of weight or both. I am now looking to purchase an LCR .357 (which I'll only shoot .38 and .38 +P rounds from )! Now just need a OWB holster.

I'm also not recoil sensative (I think) as I have a 4 5/8" SuperBlackhawk that I shoot .44 mag and .44 spcl's out of (mostly Spcl's), a GP-100 through which .357 loads are downright pleasant, etc. Actually, the most painful gun I've shot was a S&W 360PD which weighs 11 oz.'s. With 125 gr. .357 loads I thought I may have broken a bone in my hand. Only shot three rounds. Never again!

p.s. both LCR's shot to point of aim at 20 and 30 ft. respectively. Got all rounds within a fist sized group
Did you find the Crimson laser grips on the LCR .38 to be of any benefit over regular sight on LCR .38?

ilmonster
August 10, 2011, 12:55 PM
Stinger, I wasn't really wow'd by them, especially because that LCR .38 was uncomfortable to shoot. I'm so used to seeing the sights from 20 years of shooting handguns, that I bring the gun up to eye level regardless. They were also not aligned properly to the sights. I'll stick to the heavier 357 LCR and the softer Hogue Tamer grips.

stinger 327
August 10, 2011, 01:24 PM
Stinger, I wasn't really wow'd by them, especially because that LCR .38 was uncomfortable to shoot. I'm so used to seeing the sights from 20 years of shooting handguns, that I bring the gun up to eye level regardless. They were also not aligned properly to the sights. I'll stick to the heavier 357 LCR and the softer Hogue Tamer grips.
Plus those Criminson Sights cost close to $300. I believe I saw them on sale for $269. But these are point shoot guns with the laser sights you can at least attempt to get some kind of adjustment vs. the open sights.

Fiv3r
August 10, 2011, 02:34 PM
I've had no issues with my LCR over the last year+ I've carried it. I probably 2000 rounds through it. No big issue and plenty comfy to shoot. It goes to the range every time I go for at least 10 shots. Same goes for my LCP.

I have "better" guns for long term SHTF duty. My P89, G21, and .357 Black Hawk will probably still be shooting when I'm dust. I didn't buy the LCR or LCP for fun. They're peace of mind. They hide out until I (God forbid) need them. They're very well made insurance policies that I never have to leave home without when a larger more robust gun would probably left in the safe.

jawn
August 10, 2011, 03:16 PM
Stinger, I wasn't really wow'd by them, especially because that LCR .38 was uncomfortable to shoot. I'm so used to seeing the sights from 20 years of shooting handguns, that I bring the gun up to eye level regardless. They were also not aligned properly to the sights. I'll stick to the heavier 357 LCR and the softer Hogue Tamer grips.
This. The factory Hogue Tamer grips are really quite good at handling recoil. I put 200 rounds of .357/.38 special through my LCR in a range trip once, and while my hand hurt the next day, it wasn't too bad while I was shooting.

stinger 327
August 10, 2011, 04:05 PM
LCR .357 :eek: OUCH:eek:

ilmonster
August 10, 2011, 05:56 PM
I'm with you Stinger. If I feel I need more than a .38+P, I'll pack a semiauto of some type (my G19 with 124 gr+P, buy an M&P Compact in 9mm or 357Sig, Glock G30, etc.).

If I get the LCR .357, I'm not sure I'll ever shoot any .357's from it.

jawn
August 10, 2011, 07:39 PM
I'm with you Stinger. If I feel I need more than a .38+P, I'll pack a semiauto of some type (my G19 with 124 gr+P, buy an M&P Compact in 9mm or 357Sig, Glock G30, etc.).

If I get the LCR .357, I'm not sure I'll ever shoot any .357's from it.
It's fun to shoot .357 at the range every once in a while. I load mine with .38 +Ps for self-defense though. .38 +Ps are not bad at all with the slightly heavier LCR in .357.

ilmonster
August 10, 2011, 11:04 PM
If I want to shoot .357's, I'll load up my GP-100 and shoot all day long - that's fun stuff!

stinger 327
August 10, 2011, 11:53 PM
I'm with you Stinger. If I feel I need more than a .38+P, I'll pack a semiauto of some type (my G19 with 124 gr+P, buy an M&P Compact in 9mm or 357Sig, Glock G30, etc.).

If I get the LCR .357, I'm not sure I'll ever shoot any .357's from it.
I got the LCR with night sights and it is a real blast to shoot +P .38 or even regular .38 special. So that .357 LCR is going to be a monster.

jawn
August 11, 2011, 03:27 AM
If I want to shoot .357's, I'll load up my GP-100 and shoot all day long - that's fun stuff!
In total agreement, the GP100 is a blast. That said, the fireballs and racket that the LCR makes at the range with .357 Magnum is quite the experience.

The Lone Haranguer
August 11, 2011, 01:36 PM
I'm sure it will outlast your hand. :p

stinger 327
August 11, 2011, 02:10 PM
The little Ruger SP-101 in .357 is fine to shoot on range.

Pegwedge
August 11, 2011, 02:28 PM
I'm going this evening to try .357s for the first time out of my LCR. All I could find were some old CCI Blazers a buddy had. May be fun. May not ever want to shoot .357s again. Guess we'll find out.

stinger 327
August 11, 2011, 02:30 PM
I'm going this evening to try .357s for the first time out of my LCR. All I could find were some old CCI Blazers a buddy had. May be fun. May not ever want to shoot .357s again. Guess we'll find out.
Well the .38 +P or regular .38 special loads were enough for me in the LCR .38 gun. That LCR .357 I believe is 4 ounces heavier than the .38 LCR counterpart. Let us know how bad the recoil is.

ForumSurfer
August 11, 2011, 03:39 PM
I recently decided to switch from bottom feeders to a snub nosed revolver. I just need something I can slip in my pocket if need be and I'm not a fan of the sub-sub-compact bottom feeders (although my girlfriend appears to be, so I'll be purchasing some sub-sub-compact for comparisons sake once she makes up her mind). I had my heart set on an airweight. I went to pick one up and pulled the trigger on an LCR. Well I'm no revolver aficionado and I have no preferences, but the trigger feel and rock bottom used price sold me on the LCR.

I'm not carrying it, yet. Lots of training since I've never really attempted practical revolver shooting. Things have been bust over the past two weeks that I've owned it, so I've only put about 300 38sp+p rounds through it of varying bullet weights and all of them were comfortable. I've reloaded it with snap caps about ten million times trying to get my technique down (reload, fumble, watch Jerry Miculek on youtube, wash, rinse and repeat). I've dry-fired it to death.

I love the hogue grips and recoil isn't something I consider worth mentioning, honestly. I consider it a soft shooter, but recoil is so subjective that it is hard to discuss.

Reliable? Who is to say? Ruger claims to have gotten an absurdly high round count out of one with no issue...but it IS ruger doing the testing. I'm happy with it, and for $300 I feel I'll have spent that many, many times over by the time I wear it out...if I wear it out. It is what it is, though...and that is a small revolver made out of polymer, aluminum and a little bit of steel here and there. I'd be hard pressed to argue that it will reach the same round count of an all steel revolver of the same size. It is what it is, though...and that is small, affordable and lightweight. I don't see why it won't last 10,000 rounds and well beyond.

My only complaint is that although I am completely satisfied, I still want a s&w airweight and something sized similarly with a hammer that can handle 357's. Dang...now I'm getting back into revolvers, only a little more seriously this time.

stinger 327
August 11, 2011, 03:50 PM
I recently decided to switch from bottom feeders to a snub nosed revolver. I just need something I can slip in my pocket if need be and I'm not a fan of the sub-sub-compact bottom feeders (although my girlfriend appears to be, so I'll be purchasing some sub-sub-compact for comparisons sake once she makes up her mind). I had my heart set on an airweight. I went to pick one up and pulled the trigger on an LCR. Well I'm no revolver aficionado and I have no preferences, but the trigger feel and rock bottom used price sold me on the LCR.

I'm not carrying it, yet. Lots of training since I've never really attempted practical revolver shooting. Things have been bust over the past two weeks that I've owned it, so I've only put about 300 38sp+p rounds through it of varying bullet weights and all of them were comfortable. I've reloaded it with snap caps about ten million times trying to get my technique down (reload, fumble, watch Jerry Miculek on youtube, wash, rinse and repeat). I've dry-fired it to death.

I love the hogue grips and recoil isn't something I consider worth mentioning, honestly. I consider it a soft shooter, but recoil is so subjective that it is hard to discuss.

Reliable? Who is to say? Ruger claims to have gotten an absurdly high round count out of one with no issue...but it IS ruger doing the testing. I'm happy with it, and for $300 I feel I'll have spent that many, many times over by the time I wear it out...if I wear it out. It is what it is, though...and that is a small revolver made out of polymer, aluminum and a little bit of steel here and there. I'd be hard pressed to argue that it will reach the same round count of an all steel revolver of the same size. It is what it is, though...and that is small, affordable and lightweight. I don't see why it won't last 10,000 rounds and well beyond.

My only complaint is that although I am completely satisfied, I still want a s&w airweight and something sized similarly with a hammer that can handle 357's. Dang...now I'm getting back into revolvers, only a little more seriously this time.
If you want real good concealment and comfort get one of those American Arms mini revolvers in either .22 LR or .22 Magnum. Very well made guns.

Pegwedge
August 11, 2011, 09:14 PM
Just got home from the range a few minutes ago. The recoil with .357s was...tolerable. It stung the web of my hand a little bit but I don't think I'll be sore. I'm going to have to try some different loads to see if carrying it with .357s would be manageable. Need some more range time definitely.

I need to thank USBP again. Those dry fire exercises definitely paid off. I was remarkably more accurate this evening than the other day. I'm loving this little gun more and more. Now if my holster would just get here...

USBP1969
August 12, 2011, 12:29 AM
Thanks Pegwedge, that's really great to hear.

Some additional thoughts:

1) Using snap caps was a great idea. It's a lot easier on your LCR that-a-way.

2) Please keep on practicing (dry firing). It can't help but help.

3) If at all possible, dry fire and shoot with both eyes open. Closing one eye cuts down your tactical vision by ~ 33%. Additionally, if you are startled, both eyes will open as wide as possible, making it impossible to close one eye for accurate shooting.

How does one determine which eye is dominant? Just form a small circle (about 2”) using the thumb and index fingers of both hands. Extend both hands a far as possible from your face and look at a distant object through that opening. Then, keeping that object in the center of that circle, move you hands back to your eye. The eye that ends up looking through the hole is your dominant eye. For shooting a hand gun it makes no difference which eye is dominant, regardless of whether you are right or left handed. The late Jeff Cooper of Gunsite once told me that he was “cross dominant.” That is, he shot with his right hand, but his left eye was dominant. He added that for photo shoots he pretended to be right eye dominant.

If you see two targets or two sets of sights you can train your dominant eye to be more so by putting a piece of clear Scotch tape on the non-dominant eye’s shooting glass lens so that it makes that eye less able to focus on the target. Your brain will pick the eye with the better vision and train itself to use that eye over a period of time.

3) There is a tendency to only practice with the strong (shooting) hand supported by the weak (Non-dominant) hand. That’s great for recreational shooting, hunting and self defense under optimum conditions. However, for saving one’s bacon in less than optimum conditions I highly recommend that you dry fire (and shoot) strong hand only as well as weak hand only, with 2/3 of the time spent with the gun in the weak (non-dominant) hand.

4) Also, please spend time each range day shooting without sights. It’s easy and natural to do. This needs to be done live fire in order to get feedback from the bullet impact. A dirt bank with a small target is best, but if you are limited, as I am now, to an indoor range, then just reverse your target and point shoot at small 1” dots that you make with a felt tip or Sharpie. Starting at five to seven yards works best.

Using two hands, simply reach out and try to touch the dot on the paper or the small target on the back stop with the tip of your barrel with your focus on the target. Whether you draw each time or come up from ready pistol, fire only one shot each target engagement. “Hosing” (multiple shots) is not beneficial to learning accurate point shooting. You will be surprised how quickly you become accurate firing one shot at a time. And…don’t forget right and left hand only point shooting. (Note: If using a paper target, fire no more than a cylinder full at each dot before pasting up the bullet holes. Firing more than that decreases the training value.)

There are folks who say, “In the fight, front sight,” and they are absolutely right, if you can. If you are caught in what they call a “startled response” situation where your vision is riveted on the threat, or if you have an armed encounter in low light conditions, practicing point shooting can save the day. (or night)

Just some old Firearms Instructor’s additional thoughts,
-kent

stinger 327
August 12, 2011, 01:16 AM
So it's bad to dry fire a LCR? I was told it was ok.

USBP1969
August 12, 2011, 10:41 AM
Stinger - it's OK. :)

It's just easier on the gun with snap caps as it cushions the impact of the hammer on the frame.

I dry fire on a daly basis without them.

-kent

stinger 327
August 12, 2011, 12:01 PM
Stinger - it's OK. :)

It's just easier on the gun with snap caps as it cushions the impact of the hammer on the frame.

I dry fire on a daly basis without them.

-kent
Had me worried there for a moment as I love to play around with this little toy. I guess one could also use the spent .38 shells also.

DPris
August 12, 2011, 02:56 PM
Using fired brass is only good for one or two tries, after that the primer's so dented it provides no real cushioning.
Denis

stinger 327
August 12, 2011, 03:07 PM
Using fired brass is only good for one or two tries, after that the primer's so dented it provides no real cushioning.
Denis
I can see that happening.

jkulysses
August 12, 2011, 03:47 PM
I've put about 300 rounds through my 357 LCR with 200 of those being 357 mag rounds. The 38 and 38+p rounds can be shot all day long without it hurting my hand and barely any recoil. Depending on which 357 mag loads I shoot it varies from barely a sting that lasts for about 2 seconds to a sting that lasts about 10 minutes. I've never left the range with my hand still hurting. I love this gun and it is now my ccw of choice and I love the Mitch Rosen holster for it that I bought from the Ruger Store. Forget it's even there most of the time. The key to shooting this gun without it hurting your hand is make sure the web of your hand is up high on the back of the grip where the soft gel stuff is in the back of the grip. My 357 mag SP101 with the stock grips hurts the hand more than my lcr 357 mag. Put the Hogue grip on the SP101 and thats another story though. If you aren't concerned with weight and want more of an everyday shooter then the SP101 with hogue grips is what I would recommend. I carry my lcr with 357 Magtech hollow points because they only sting for a couple seconds. Even if you miss the blast of sound and fire is going to make them flee lol.

stinger 327
August 12, 2011, 04:06 PM
I've put about 300 rounds through my 357 LCR with 200 of those being 357 mag rounds. The 38 and 38+p rounds can be shot all day long without it hurting my hand and barely any recoil. Depending on which 357 mag loads I shoot it varies from barely a sting that lasts for about 2 seconds to a sting that lasts about 10 minutes. I've never left the range with my hand still hurting. I love this gun and it is now my ccw of choice and I love the Mitch Rosen holster for it that I bought from the Ruger Store. Forget it's even there most of the time. The key to shooting this gun without it hurting your hand is make sure the web of your hand is up high on the back of the grip where the soft gel stuff is in the back of the grip. My 357 mag with the stock grips hurts the hand more than my lcr 357 mag. Put the Hogue grip on the SP101 and thats another story though. If you aren't concerned with weight and want more of an everyday shooter then the SP101 with hogue grips is what I would recommend. I carry my lcr with 357 Magtech hollow points because they only sting for a couple seconds.
You have got to try the .38 +P 158 grain Buffalo Bore Ammo or better yet the Buffalo Bore Ammo in .357. There are a few different loads in .357 but the 125 grain 1,700fps? is a real kicker.

Cop Bob
August 12, 2011, 08:35 PM
I can't speak to torture tests, or high round counts.. But I did buy an LCR for the Wife..

Great fit n finish, light weight, Really nice trigger right outta the box.. I have put only 50 rounds through it, and they were wadcutters, but one thing I will say...

It shoots to point of aim on the 11 yard line.. It appears to be all that and a bag of chips for a nice pocket pistol lightweight CCW, Boot gun etc... I cannot knock it at all, Well the sight could be a little sharper, but so could my eyes..

I think Ruger did a nice job with this one.. It is small and light enough to were the wife actually carries it about all the time, and doesn't complain about the weight or it bothering her.. What more ya want?

USBP1969
August 12, 2011, 09:10 PM
FWIW - I fired 50 rounds last Friday through three different S&W 442's. It was a mix of 130 Federal FMC, 130 grain Winchester PDX-1 and Speer 135 Gold Dot JHP.

I was attempting to find out if there was a POA /POI shift at 25 yards. (There was a 2 1/2 - 3 1/2" shift to the left with all three weapons. )

Bottom line is that today (the following Tuesday) the web of my shooting hand is still very sore.

I was quite surprised as the only other weapon that ever did that to me was a Ruger Redhawk 5 1/5" .44 Magnum firing Remington 240 grain JHP loads with stock wood grips.

Now, you are probably getting a reading on your "Wimpometer," but in my defense I can truly say that because of my employment, I have fired is excess of a million rounds of center fire handgun ammo, and up to now only the Redhawk had nailed me.

Well, sad to say it's a week later and I had to for go any shooting today due to pain and swelling in the web of my right hand. Maybe something was damaged last Friday shooting the 442's. And to think I just traded a S&W 351C .22 Magnum for a 442.

-kent

Strykervet
August 12, 2011, 09:11 PM
I have a 340PD. I think it is the best thing ever made for what it does. It weighs 14oz. loaded, and I've put it in my pocket and forgot I had it a few times. I don't care how big you are, carrying a heavy piece isn't as comfortable as a light one. If you need a high quality super light snub, this can't be beat. For everyday carry, I have a G29, but when I need something for the pocket in light shorts, I grab the 340.

The 340PD is a .357mag, it'll handle 'em, but you won't like 'em. The thing is brutal, but that is what you get for super light weight. Most recoil of anything I've ever shot. Target practice with .38spcl., 158gr. non+P, is okay though. The lighter bullets hurt the worst. You anyway. It is fairly accurate for what it is, and it fills a specialty role better than anything else could: durability, firepower, size, and all being as light as possible, there isn't anything else quite like it.

Now they make this think in several flavors now. There is the 340PD, scandium frame, titanium cylinder, this is the lightest one. I think of it as a specialty gun. Then there is the 340NG, the night guard, and it is the same frame with a stainless cylinder. Probably not AS brutal. There is the 640, and it is all stainless. All are hammerless, the low profile kind. There is also one like the 640 that is hammerless with the higher profile. Then all of these are made with hammers, just 360 instead of 340. That is in J-frame.

I also have a 686+6", but they make it in 3" and a snub too. That would be my first choice for a carry revolver if I were to carry it exclusively. 7 shots and the trigger can be made into a world class setup. I got mine for a little over $200 in the late '90's and I wouldn't take $1000 for it today.

The Smith and Wesson Night Guard series has a lot to choose from. All snubs from 2.5-2.75", all calibres from .38spcl.-.44mag, including 10mm and .45ACP. 5 shots to 8 shots in .357, all frame sizes, and 6 shots in most of the other ones.

Oh, and Smith also makes this 8 shot .357 snub, a large frame snub. It is a custom shop piece. Scandium frame, titanium cylinder.

The Ruger revolvers are well built, that they are, but I think the Smith revolvers have a better feel and a better trigger, and they come in soooo many flavors, it is hard not to find one that you like.

I think plastic has no place on a revolver. That is where I draw the line plain and simple.

snooperman
August 13, 2011, 05:19 PM
it is a great gun for women... and men. The trigger is the best of the snubby guns out there and it shoots to point of aim at 30 feet. Ruger hit a "Grand Slam" with this one.

stinger 327
August 13, 2011, 06:27 PM
I can't speak to torture tests, or high round counts.. But I did buy an LCR for the Wife..

Great fit n finish, light weight, Really nice trigger right outta the box.. I have put only 50 rounds through it, and they were wadcutters, but one thing I will say...

It shoots to point of aim on the 11 yard line.. It appears to be all that and a bag of chips for a nice pocket pistol lightweight CCW, Boot gun etc... I cannot knock it at all, Well the sight could be a little sharper, but so could my eyes..

I think Ruger did a nice job with this one.. It is small and light enough to were the wife actually carries it about all the time, and doesn't complain about the weight or it bothering her.. What more ya want?
One other reason I got one was that the trigger pull was very smooth and felt good. This gun also felt real good in my hands.

browncoatdawn
August 13, 2011, 08:02 PM
I have been out of action for a year now, and find myself in a wheelchair due to a nasty accident. Maybe I will walk again, but I know I am going to carry again. Finding options that work with a wheelchair are slim, I turned to the LCR. I love the feel so far, and will be picking up a 357 model as soon as I can. I figure it will handle all the 38 +p I can throw at it. My uncle gave me 9 boxes of old NyClad rounds, and I always favored Remington and Hornady ammo.

This little giant seems to be the way to go in its class of CCW. The smith seemed to have a poor trigger, and the charter arms and taurus both lost out on feel.

For range work, I have my Taurus 627ss and Ruger GP100 in the 357 mag, so I don't really mind an over built 38sp lol

antiquus
August 14, 2011, 04:15 AM
Lost the LCR to the wife, who in spite of being a little arthritic has no trouble with with standard .38 rounds, I loaded it up with Nyclads.

I have a 686+ 6" as well, and my daily is a 242 - trigger almost identical to the 686+ and same speedloaders. But as much as I like S&W, Ruger probably extended the life of the revolver 50 years with the LCR, and if imitation is the sincerest complement, S&W and Taurus must like the idea too.

If you enjoyed reading about "Ruger LCR Durability" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!