Keeping Brass Shiny


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OldmanFCSA
August 12, 2011, 08:04 AM
After tumbling cases to near perfection, shiny to point of brass having absolutely no tarnish, How do I keep int that way until I load?

Vacumm seal in bags/

In ZipLoc bags - then in a AmmoCan? (what I do now)

Other ideas?

????? is it possible to tumble in a hard wax mixture of some sort to seal the cases from oxidation and other "ageing" side effects ??????

I'm asking for unloaded brass to be individually sealed in some kind of "chemical" for lack of a better term, to keep it shiny. Would this sealer then cause any damage to rifle chamber upon firing after loading.

^
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In slow times I "match" prepare my brass up to point of installing primer.
Then I store it for the day it gets reloaded. How do I stop the "tarnish ageing " process?

I mean keeping it super shiney!

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Walkalong
August 12, 2011, 08:29 AM
If you use polish it leaves a bit of a wax film on the brass and it stays pretty shiny just thrown in a bucket or box kept closed and stored in a reasonable environment....

kingmt
August 12, 2011, 08:45 AM
I can't add much to that.

Yes. You can add a hard wax but you shouldn't use very much. If you use polish you shouldn't need anything else.

OldmanFCSA
August 12, 2011, 08:49 AM
If you use polish it leaves a bit of a wax film on the brass and it stays pretty shiny just thrown in a bucket or box kept closed and stored in a reasonable environment....
What kind of Polish?

I need it to be applied to mass quantities - not individual cases 1 by 1.

kingmt
August 12, 2011, 08:51 AM
I've tried some wax for lubing while sizing. It worked great & got 2 birds with one stone. I normally use polish to lube with tho. I have some that I don't like for anything else but it works great for lube.

kingmt
August 12, 2011, 08:52 AM
I need it to be applied to mass quantities - not individual cases 1 by 1.
Just add a little to your tumbler media. A little goes a long way.

ColtPythonElite
August 12, 2011, 09:12 AM
I tumble with NuFinish. I have cases that have been tumbled and sitting in bins on my bench for about a year. Sure, they may have dulled a smidge, but they still are pretty darn shiny.

jcwit
August 12, 2011, 11:34 AM
Any automotive liquid cleaner polish/wax, Meguirers, Kit, Eagle Ice, and on and on, many here recommend Nu-Finish and it is what I use but in reality any liquid auto polish works,

Only use a teaspoon or two to a tumbler of media and do not add till you see a decrease in the polishing ability of the media. Using to much will gloop "not sure thats a word, but you get the idea" up the media.

Just a case of where less is more.

bds
August 12, 2011, 12:03 PM
+1. I used to use Dillon/MidwayUSA brass polish and tried different liquid car wax/polish but settled on NuFinish liquid car polish.

With walnut media, it seems to do a better job of cleaning brass and leaves residual film that resist tarnishing of brass cases. I also clean/polish my dies in walnut media and NuFinish and they do a great job of removing surface rust and keeping them rust free for 6-12+ months.

With new walnut media, I add 2 capfuls of NuFinish to treat the walnut media initially (I run the tumbler for 10+ minutes or until I don't see any clumps) and add 1 capful for every 3-4 loads.

Fishslayer
August 12, 2011, 01:33 PM
Nu Finish car polish with the media.

Nitrile gloves when handling. The gloves give a good grip on the slick brass & bullets, too.

Bula
August 12, 2011, 03:24 PM
Another Nufinish user here. Good tip on using gloves. But mine still tarnish a little over time. You can always run them through the tumbler again prior to loading. I did the small cut Corn cob (14/20 I think) so no more cob in the flash hole.

Julian537
August 12, 2011, 03:27 PM
+4 to the Nufinish. I also like the glove idea. Those things get pretty slick!

Nick93
August 12, 2011, 04:34 PM
You didnt say with way method you cleaned the brass ... I use wet media that cleans every single part of the case ... the primer pocket, the rim, the inside of the case and eventually polishes them ... but if you donīt keep them in a hot and virtually no humidity place then thay will tern a bit dark (not to much) ....
Did you know that commercial ammo manufacturers use an really thin wax when they finish the loading process...but which one? in dry or wet media ?

This wax makes the ammo extremely resitant to corrosion and other enviroment problems... remember that a case of ammo can be 1 or 2 years in a gun store before you pick them up ... and they always lock brand new :P

Otto
August 12, 2011, 05:24 PM
Vacumm seal in bags/

In ZipLoc bags - then in a AmmoCan? (what I do now)

Other ideas?Those methods help but don't actually remove the oxygen that causes the tarnish.
For that you'll need oxygen absorbers.
http://www.sorbentsystems.com/o2absorbers.html
They're inexpensive sachets that can be found easily. Mylar bags are most often used with oxygen absorbers.
This is a common means of long term storage with survivalist.
Here's how to seal a mylar bag:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fk9b0dAtJ80

fguffey
August 12, 2011, 07:01 PM
To clean cases to a high shine and keep it that way use ammo cans, 30 cal, 20 MM or 50 Cal, small, medium and large, as a suggestion warm the can before loading the cans, then close to seal, same for pistols, heat the can, wrap the pistol then place in can, close the can.



For those with country roots and remember the Mason jar, same thing, heat the jar, fill with cases, close to seal the jar, then wait for the lid to 'pop', my favorite jar is the wide mouth 1 gallon jar, if jar is filled with loose cases the reloader can monitor the cases for oxidation, no atmosphere, no moisture no corrosion, then there are those that have mastered the skill of air conditioning and have vacuum pumps, somewhere close to 29 inches of vacuum water boils at about 0 degree. Install shrader valves, load containers, vacuum the container, after that, time stands still and as long as the components are in the sealed container the reloader is not getting further behind.

F. Guffey

beatledog7
August 12, 2011, 07:27 PM
Another Nu Finish user. Works great for me with corncob.

If you want brass to stay shiny, tumble it, reload it, shoot it, and tumble it again. Voila', shiny!

AK_Maine_iac
August 12, 2011, 09:27 PM
I have a case of 24 bottles of liquid turtle wax that was given to me. Has anyone ever tried it in the media?

1SOW
August 12, 2011, 09:36 PM
After tumbling cases to near perfection, shiny to point of brass having absolutely no tarnish, How do I keep int that way until I load?



I have a tarnish problem if they are stored for long periods before use..
I use Nu-Finish and store the shiny brass in plastic coffee containers--10-15K 9mm cases tumbled and polished. It works "for a while".
I prefer WIN brass so my PPU, R&P, and ATK/FC brass sometimes stay in the containers for a year or more. These show tarnish when I break them out. They are still somewhat somewhat shiny and "slippery" but they are also tarnished.

Strykervet
August 12, 2011, 09:41 PM
They have stuff that goes in the media. I just tumble using the Lyman tumbler and their corn cob media. Then put it up dry. High humidity will cause it to corrode over time. I left some in a basement and it didn't fare too well.

jcwit
August 12, 2011, 10:18 PM
I have a case of 24 bottles of liquid turtle wax that was given to me. Has anyone ever tried it in the media?


It will work just fine.

Brass will tarnish just as silver will. I remember my mother always having to polish our silver for the holidays before using. Not much of anything will stop it completly over time. I do have polished brass thats been stored for over 5 years thats just starting to turn. Its been stored in shotgun shell boxes in a second story room with no heat or A/C.

RustyFN
August 12, 2011, 11:41 PM
I was going to say Nu Finish car polish but it looks like 30 people beat me to it. :D I add 1/2 cap full or a little less to every batch I tumble.

oldreloader
August 13, 2011, 12:17 AM
I agree with Rusty.. About 1/2 capfull of Nu Finish and tumble..Shiney and slick!

OldmanFCSA
August 13, 2011, 12:51 AM
I use the wet ss pin process for cleaning in my tumbler.
I don't use corncob or walnut hulls anymore (but still have lots and cement mixer is broken again due to motor burnout = not made for continous run).
A wax process is what I thinking should be used. Tumble in hard balls of wax, little balls to wax inside cases too.

????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????/

fguffey
August 13, 2011, 12:06 PM
"After tumbling cases to near perfection, shiny to point of brass having absolutely no tarnish, How do I keep int that way until I load?"

"Vacumm seal in bags/"

"To clean cases to a high shine and keep it that way use ammo cans, 30 cal, 20 MM or 50 Cal, small, medium and large, as a suggestion warm the can before loading the cans, then close to seal, same for pistols, heat the can, wrap the pistol then place in can, close the can.



For those with country roots and remember the Mason jar, same thing, heat the jar, fill with cases, close to seal the jar, then wait for the lid to 'pop', my favorite jar is the wide mouth 1 gallon jar, if jar is filled with loose cases the reloader can monitor the cases for oxidation, no atmosphere, no moisture no corrosion, then there are those that have mastered the skill of air conditioning and have vacuum pumps, somewhere close to 29 inches of vacuum water boils at about 0 degree. Install shrader valves, load containers, vacuum the container, after that, time stands still and as long as the components are in the sealed container the reloader is not getting further behind."

....and when I want to clean a few cases for 'bling' at the range bench I use a home made spinner, nice to have 'JIC', just in case.

F. Guffey

fguffey
August 13, 2011, 12:13 PM
...and when I chamber a round I want nothing between the case and chamber, polish, wax, lube or anything else that seals the atmosphere from the case could prevent the case from locking onto the chamber.

I use corn cob media and nothing.

F. Guffey

jcwit
August 13, 2011, 12:54 PM
fguffey, a layer of auto polish/wax thinner than what you would put on your cars finish is not going to hurt one Iota, the fingerprints you leave from loading the mags are more than likely thicker.

medalguy
August 13, 2011, 01:01 PM
Toss your loaded ammo back in the tumbler for about 15 minutes for one final shine before putting it away.

And remember, tarnish is really oxidation of the brass surface. Keep oxygen (air) away from it and that will decrease chances of oxidation. And oh yeah, tarnished brass of mine shoots just as accurately as bright purty brass.

OldmanFCSA
August 13, 2011, 02:00 PM
Thanks for the replies, everyone!!!
I typically bag every round loaded in large heavy-duty Zip-Loc style bags, and then store in an ammo can.
I've got ammo I loaded in 1982 that is still clean and shoots very accurately, 25-06 and 243Win.
For my pistol brass, after loading I re-tumble it with corncob media, clean in a fluffy bathtowel (wife hates it when I do this), bag and store in ammo can. It looks great for a long time.
However, just curious if there is any GOOD way to prevent the normal oxidation from occurring on brass, in a way that will not cause problems in the chamber. Like a chemical treatment of the brass sealing it until next cleaning. A treatment that will seal out the oxygen - air . ??

Thank you everyone for your input.

jcwit
August 13, 2011, 02:12 PM
Years ago there was a bag thing, have no idea what it was, that mom used to put in the silverwear chest to prevent tarnish, but she still polished the silver ware before the holidays.

Check with someone who collects new silver coins. They may have an idea.

Here's a find, google "how to keep silver from tarnishing", I know you're asking about brass but its the same as silver as far as tarnish goes.

bds
August 13, 2011, 03:46 PM
However, just curious if there is any GOOD way to prevent the normal oxidation from occurring on brass, in a way that will not cause problems in the chamber. Like a chemical treatment of the brass sealing it until next cleaning. A treatment that will seal out the oxygen - air
I keep my match/range/plinking reloads in Folgers coffee cans with plastic snap lids and they do not develop tarnish on the brass case that's been tumble polished with either brass polish like Dillon/MidwayUSA or NuFinish. I usually shoot my reloads within a year, so can't say how long they would be tarnish-free.

I keep my Golden Saber/Gold Dot JHP reloads in Food Saver vacuum sealed plastic bags. I have never seen any tarnish develop on the nickel plated or brass cases.

Russia lacquer coated their steel cased ammo and it seem to do a good job of keeping them rust free. But it would be a little messy dipping all those rounds in lacquer, not to mention having lacquer chips all over your firearms.

If you are looking for tarnish-free long-term storage, brass/NuFinish polish and vacuum packing in plastic is what I would recommend.

fguffey
August 14, 2011, 01:28 AM
jcwit,

"...and when I chamber a round I want nothing between the case and chamber, polish, wax, lube or anything else that seals the atmosphere from the case could prevent the case from locking onto the chamber"

"I use corn cob media and nothing"

Reloading is a discipline....to me, another question was asked on another thread and the answer was "Yes, it is OK, just wing-it. I want my case to lock to the chamber. Again, if I want to be vain and polish my brass I will use a home made spinner.

The advantage to cleaning brass with a spinner is for short runs of 20 cases or less, it takes less time to spin 20 cases than it takes to tumble them.

F. Guffey

fguffey
August 14, 2011, 05:32 PM
jcwit,

"Enlighten me as to how it takes any time to tumble brass? Dump it in and go about your business, dump it out. You spend no time watching it tumble.

Unless I'm missing something, it's like an automatic washer, no one watches the cloths wash, that's was the idea behind the automatic washer.

Have a good day"

I will type slower, I build a rifle, I form cases, I spin cases instead of tumbling, again tumbling could take 1 + hours, spinning would require less then 10 minutes.

Or I go to the range with a friend that lives less than a mile from the range,. as was the case with a 300 Win Mag Model 70 Winchester, nothing worked, so he has bullets, powder primers and dies and we do not have an hour to tumble the cases and he does not have enough 300 Win Mag cases that are prepped, by spinning we were back at the range, the rifle went back to Winchester, the $10.00 we pay to use the range is for all day.

'fguffey, a layer of auto polish/wax thinner than what you would put on your cars finish is not going to hurt one.....'

Typing slower: I did not ask you how thick a coating was on the case, I said I did not want anything between the case and chamber, I did not tell you not to do it, matter has weight and takes up space, because time is a factor I am happy with a small amount of air between the case and chamber.

F. Guffey

Pugsbrew
August 14, 2011, 06:20 PM
I spin cases instead of tumbling,

OK, what exactly is this?

fguffey
August 14, 2011, 07:51 PM
Pugsbrew, I have an in-line, angle and butt grinder, the machine is used to make pilots, tapper gages and even head space gages, problems with that is there is the perception head space gages are made by Martians, not humans.

Some use the Lee Zip Drive to polish cases, it works but the shell holder covers the head of the case, I grind punches and round shafts with a taper, then install the tapered pilot in a drill and use to spin cases, I first use green 3M scoth brite pads on the worst of cases then steel wool, the advantage with spinning the cases is the open end, no shell holder, steel wool can be used to hold the case against the spinner, this shines the case head and case body, care must be taken for cases with week necks because of splits.

F. Guffey

Walkalong
August 14, 2011, 08:26 PM
Yawn.

Spin em, tumble em, wash em in solution. Who cares how you do it, and it certainly isn't worth degrading people over.

OldmanFCSA
August 15, 2011, 12:45 AM
Yawn.

Spin em, tumble em, wash em in solution. Who cares how you do it, and it certainly isn't worth degrading people over.
I agree "it certainly isn't worth degrading people over. "

Mods - please lock this thread - it is going to end badly.

fguffey
August 15, 2011, 08:15 AM
OldmanFSCA want to know how to keep his brass looking good.

"In slow times I "match" prepare my brass up to point of installing primer.
Then I store it for the day it gets reloaded. How do I stop the "tarnish ageing " process?"

"I mean keeping it super shiney!"

If his brass is looking good I will assume he has the tumbling part down to his satisfaction.

Again, he can use ammo cans, just heat the can (do not burn the paint or melt the seal).

He can use glass canning jars with good lids, just heat the jar, the large wide mouth jars work for me.

Again, I do not use anything in my tumbler but tumbling media, on short notice I spin cases with a home made spinner, saves time, it takes an hour to tumble 1 case or two hundred, I can spin 20 300 Win Mag cases in less than 10 minutes, it is an option.

And I am not a facilitator, I am not a Constituent. , I have one standard for behavior and character.

There are inert gases that can be used instead of heat, tons of food is stored in this manner, caution when using 'hot ice' never close the lid while it is evaporating, allow the gas to displace the air/atmosphere in the container then remove the 'ice' before closing the lid.

F. Guffey

LBEE
August 15, 2011, 08:26 AM
I use the Stainless Steel & a rock tumbler to polish mine. I did use the tumbler & corn cob
media till looking at the difference with the Stainless method where the inside of the case , primer pocket, are also shiny & clean in a lot less time.

fguffey
August 15, 2011, 02:07 PM
http://www.stainlesstumblingmedia.com/?gclid=CK6X2cDa0aoCFcY32godDU-hzw

A good introduction to stainless pins should be the cost, pins, tumbler and lime shine $259.00.

Their media, their tumbler, it was not that long ago when ceramic was the rage, to be among the IN on the reloading forums ceramic was the standard, then it was realized ceramic was heavier and the tumbler designed for ground up walnuts and cob could not handle the extra weight.

Then there is "LIME SHINE"? There are reloaders that should know better signing up for it without questioning all the answers.



For the worst of cases I use Vinegar, once for the life of the case for a maximum of 15 minutes. I tried 30 minutes with small batches, the cases turned pink/orange, therefore 20 minutes is too long, to remove the pink/orange I could have spun the cases and removed the DAMAGE but I was cleaning old rusty tools that have a lot of rust, not something someone wants to start and forget but the process was slow, to speed up cleaning cast iron use H2S03, H2S03 is non forgiving and most certainly not for those that do not question all the answers, time is cut to seconds.

I use media and nothing, in the old days the edge was in the oil additive, I used Rislone, they guaranteed me if their product did not help my engine it would do nothing to hurt it. I still us it but not in my engines.

And Marvel Mystery oil, I still use it also, for everything.

F. Guffey

jcwit
August 15, 2011, 03:07 PM
If your brass is turning pink or orange colored for any reason as in a vinger bath you are leaching the zinc out of the brass.

As far as using S/S pins and a rock tumbler "rotary type" a person can cut the cost drastically by using the rotary tumbler available from Harbor Freight, cost approx $39.00. Granted it not as heavy duty as the Thumblers Tumbler, but then it works fine and doesn't cost $150 to $200 either.

Regarding LemiShine, its available at WalMart.

Final thoughts: If one wants shinney brass at least on the outside, tumble with corn cob media 20/40 grit, which is fine so as not to plug primer pockets or flash holes, with a capfull or 2 of liquid auto cleaner wax/polish added to the corn cob media. It will also add a extremely light coating to the brass to retard tarnish.

How do I know this works? I've been reloading for almost 50 years, with time comes experience, with experience comes knowledge. But there is still much to learn even then.

rondog
August 15, 2011, 04:48 PM
Final thoughts: If one wants shinney brass at least on the outside, tumble with corn cob media 20/40 grit, which is fine so as not to plug primer pockets or flash holes, with a capfull or 2 of liquid auto cleaner wax/polish added to the corn cob media. It will also add a extremely light coating to the brass to retard tarnish.

^This!^ Results in.....

http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b150/rinselman/guns/ammo%20and%20reloading/DSCN3485.jpg

http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b150/rinselman/guns/ammo%20and%20reloading/DSCN3486.jpg

Walkalong
August 15, 2011, 05:12 PM
And this....

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=112294&d=1262538215

SSN Vet
August 15, 2011, 05:30 PM
another NuFinish user here....

I think the film makes resizing a bit easier as well.

I also dab a touch of Imperial on every 10th case prior to sizing and the thin wax film keeps them looking nice in the box untill used.

1SOW
August 16, 2011, 12:48 AM
Walkalong, I really like that pic!

When it's hard to find the nickle plated amongst the polished brass, the cases are shiny.

Sport45
August 16, 2011, 04:42 AM
I tumble my brass with a Lyman Turbo 1200 (or something like that) with ground walnut until it's clean. I don't want any wax or anything else left on the brass when I'm done. The brass is not supposed to be lubricated in any way, shape, or form for use in any gun I own. I know some guns require lubricated cases, but I haven't seen one at the ranges I've been to.

If the brass tarnishes a bit before I use it, so be it. That just means I waited too long to shoot it. ;)

Walkalong
August 16, 2011, 08:35 AM
I put some .357 brass in the tumbler last night after trimming, deburring and chamfering. I only meant to tumble them for a few minutes as they were tumbled before sizing and trimming. I really need to go out to the shed and get them. :o

I bet they are shiny. :)

jcwit
August 16, 2011, 10:36 AM
I tumble my brass with a Lyman Turbo 1200 (or something like that) with ground walnut until it's clean. I don't want any wax or anything else left on the brass when I'm done. The brass is not supposed to be lubricated in any way, shape, or form for use in any gun I own. I know some guns require lubricated cases, but I haven't seen one at the ranges I've been to.


So factory loaded ammo that has been tumbled with a polish and an additive to keep it from tarnishing as it sits on retail shelves, sometimes for years is not suitable for your firearms. OOOOOOOOOOOOOOkay

Whatever trips your trigger.

Sport45
August 16, 2011, 01:35 PM
I haven't brought any store-bought ammo (except .22lr and shotshells) into my house in a long time. What I have doesn't look any more shiny than my reloads. How long do they expect the shine to last after they make it?

chrt396
August 16, 2011, 03:40 PM
I sit there while watching TV and use Never dull..and polish each case to a mirror shine..then freeze them until ready to use. I pre-heat the oven to 250 degrees and heat for 10 minutes until ready to serve!

By the way..just kidding!

jcwit
August 16, 2011, 03:51 PM
How long do they expect the shine to last after they make it?

No idea really, but I have .22 rimfire from the 70's thats still shinney.

Only factory I've bought in the last 20/30 years thats reloadable is odd ball calibers where brass is hard to come by ie; 7.5 x 54 French MAS, 7.7 Japanese, 7.5 Schmidt Rubin ect. I reload for close to 40 different calibers, been reloading for around 50 years.

Sport45
August 16, 2011, 10:58 PM
My old rimfire is pretty shiny too. But I suppose the wax from the bullets does get on everything with those.

When you mentioned rimfire from the 70's I remembered a couple bricks of Thunderbolt I brought home from my dad's place a few years ago. Left over from when we were teenagers. Still pretty clean and shoots great. I wonder when Thunderbolt took the quality dive?

DHass
August 17, 2011, 11:29 AM
As long as the brass is clean I don't care if it tarnishes a little after tumbling. It is what is inside that counts not the outside.

fguffey
August 17, 2011, 02:32 PM
Colt45, DHass, I agree with you, I am not an enabler and believe some of the conduct by some on this form is stalking in nature.

It is not possible to make it fool proof, they do not read.

R. Lee in his book on modern reloading thought bling and shine was vain and not absolutely necessary, I know brass has a embeddable property, I do not want dirt, grit and grime embedding into the case, dies and chambers can be scratched with the abrasive material.

http://www.stainlesstumblingmedia.com/lemi-shine-detergent.html

I mention for the worst of cases I use vinegar, for 15 minutes maximum ONCE for the life of the case. I mention pink/orange coloring when too much time is used. After that? A link to Lemi-shine is posted.

Walkalone, explain to me the difference, if stainless pins are used with lime shine and lime shine has acid, what keeps the acid in lime shine from (as they say) leaching the zinc from the case.

Again, I do not have two standards for behavior.

F. Guffey

Walkalong
August 17, 2011, 02:41 PM
It's Walkalong, and how should I know, I use corncob. (Sorry, I am just an idiot on the internet)

You do seem to be confused as to who you are ragging today though. I believe I know who you meant, but I am sure you will figure it out.

popper
August 17, 2011, 03:36 PM
jcwit
Mothballs. Car wax content is mostly CLAY, with some chemicals added to clean off the oxidation. Ammonia leaches brass, vinegar will but is a LOT slower. Lemi-shine or cool-aid removes carbon and mildly passivates the brass. It must be removed or will eventually discolor the brass. triple di-water will remove everything also, but costs $$$$$. Objective should be to get the carbon, dirt, grease and wax off the case, inside the neck and PP

jcwit
August 17, 2011, 03:41 PM
DHass wrote
As long as the brass is clean I don't care if it tarnishes a little after tumbling. It is what is inside that counts not the outside.

fgruffy wrote
Colt45, DHass, I agree with you, I

Cleaning/polishing brass is not absolutly necessary, neither is shaving and dressing appropriately when going out in public, washing and waxing my vehicles is not necessary either. Many many thing we do in life is not necessary but we do them for our own personal pleasure or satification, and possiblely our ego also.

I happen to be ion the group that likes my cartridges shinney, as well as my firearms and the rest of my shooting equipment. I to do not have 2 standards, but I do place mine on the high side and good looking.

jcwit
August 17, 2011, 03:51 PM
popper, are saying its moth balls that prevents tarnish?

Correct about auto polish, I see with a quick search that jewelers rouge is iron oxide.

gamestalker
August 17, 2011, 05:32 PM
I'm on the same page as Fguffey. I don't ant anything between the brass and my chamber walls. The brass needs to have a good sieze to the chamber when the pressures expand the brass to prevent it from stressing the bolt face and lugs.

jcwit
August 17, 2011, 05:39 PM
If that's what makes you happy, have at it.

Guess I just don't know what I'm doing being as I reload and shoot 15,000 tpo 20,000 rounds a summer season. Haven't had a bolt or lug problem yet in 50 years.

GW Staar
August 17, 2011, 06:21 PM
WHAT! You're having a party and I wasn't invited???:D

Nothing seems to get the passions going better than to bling or not to bling. I don't really care one way or the other. I reloaded without a tumbler or bling for 30 years. Always wanted a tumbler, but never got around to it. Now that I have a big ole Lyman 2500, I admit it, I like being vain. What's not to like! But mostly I like not have to rub my brass down one at a time to clean it preparatory to sizing. I use 20/40 cob and a capful of Dillon brass polish, and it makes it plenty purty. (I use Dillon just because they stock the stuff close by...I just pour it over my filled-up tumbler full of cob and brass, and I've never seen a single clump last more than a couple of minutes of tumbling.)

But all that is irrelevent to the original question. Mine doesn't stay blingy if I'm wanting to store it for a rainy day. So what? Well the O.P. cares. So here's a way to make it last for a long long time if that's what's important to you:

http://www.woodcraft.com/Images/products/08G22_400.jpgAcid neutral, water and alcohol resistant.
Preferred by museums worldwide for protecting furniture, leather, marble, paintings and metal.
Will not stain or discolor with aging. You use the tiniest amount. No more than a molecule or two between your brass and the chamber...unmeasurable by anything I own. One 200ml container will last a lifetime.

Do I make it? Heavens no, it was created in England for the National Museum. But you can get it in the States, HERE (http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2003235/462/Renaissance-Wax.aspx). When I have to restore something, I protect it with this. BTW, the site has a video on it.:)

jcwit
August 17, 2011, 06:32 PM
Excellent product, top of the line.

Seedtick
August 17, 2011, 06:55 PM
...you can get it in the States, HERE (http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2003235/462/Renaissance-Wax.aspx). When I have to restore something, I protect it with this. BTW, the site has a video on it.:)

You can also get it from Midway.

Renaissance Wax Rust Preventative and Gun Stock Polish 7 oz (http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=857663)

or

Renaissance Wax Rust Preventative and Gun Stock Polish 2.25 oz (http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=541091)

HTH

Seedtick

:)

GW Staar
August 17, 2011, 07:00 PM
Great! Not surprised. A good product always finds its way to Midway eventually. Same price too.

OldmanFCSA
August 19, 2011, 01:51 AM
A few examples - posted elsewhere here too.

http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq141/09oldman/Brass-50BMG/100_3863.jpg

http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq141/09oldman/Brass-50BMG/100_3862.jpg

http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq141/09oldman/Brass-50BMG/100_3861.jpg

http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq141/09oldman/Brass-50BMG/100_3859.jpg

http://i442.photobucket.com/albums/qq141/09oldman/Brass-50BMG/100_3860.jpg

First 3 pictures are Frankfort Arsenal 1949 brass.

Next two are TW-45 for SA-690's and IK-98 for Lehigh 510-130's.

Jusgdfry
August 30, 2011, 11:52 PM
Try the 3M Anti-Tarnish Strips. I am a jeweler by trade and this is cut into small pcs and put in baggies with the silver jewelry and it keeps it from tarnishing for a long period of time.

Jusgdfry
August 30, 2011, 11:53 PM
I have not tried it as of yet but I have been having the same issues with keeping my brass nice and shinny. I will try this next week and will re-post on this subject when I see the results.

AlliedArmory
September 1, 2011, 07:52 AM
I use the wet style tumbler to get they clean enough to eat off of. For my rifle cases I tumble then in a vibratory tumbler with corn cob and NU finish. they stay pretty shiny in just zip lock bags for quite some time.

popper
September 1, 2011, 05:18 PM
mothballs is what granny used to keep the silver from tarnishing.

Jasper1573
September 1, 2011, 10:38 PM
The length of this thread is a CLEAR indication that vanity exists even in reloading!

Walkalong
September 2, 2011, 08:43 AM
Vanity, pride, care, OCD, attention to detail, whatever you want to call it. .......... :)

stillkickin
September 2, 2011, 09:22 AM
use only a tiny amount in your media. too much and it gets kind of cloudy

jcwit
September 2, 2011, 11:18 AM
Tiney amount of what?

BTW, is vanity the reason I wash my car?

PreMod70
September 2, 2011, 12:36 PM
What if I told you that unpolished brass clings to the chamber wall better thus giving you more consistant harmonics and the accuracy that follows.

jcwit
September 2, 2011, 12:47 PM
OK, if that suits you, but I wonder at what point is "unpolished" the best. Slightly unpolished? Pretty dull unpolished? Downright ugly unpolished?

Wait, those are all subjective terms, just as unpolished is.

Where pray tell does one go from here?

Jasper1573
September 2, 2011, 08:16 PM
I wash my truck once or twice a year whether it needs it or not, but being moderately grimey doesn't make it stick to the road any beter;0)

I have heard different opinions on clean brass and dirty brass and chamber adhesion, but not any quantifiable studies or evidence, though there may be some out there.

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