Unknown 1911


PDA






nootimus
August 17, 2011, 10:50 PM
Can anyone out there identify this 1911 style pistol. It appears to say "Regetts" on it. I can find nothing with google. Figured one of our experts might have an idea.

Thanks,
Noot

If you enjoyed reading about "Unknown 1911" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
JellyJar
August 17, 2011, 10:56 PM
Attached picture is too small to see any identifying details.

We need fairly large close ups of any markings.

nootimus
August 17, 2011, 11:24 PM
OK. I will get a bigger picture and post it up tommorow. Thanks.

tangomike706
August 17, 2011, 11:27 PM
Pending a larger picture , I'm going to guess that what you have is a Regent Arms 1911

nootimus
August 18, 2011, 01:51 PM
Outstanding work Tango Mike! That is what the pistol is/was. Thanks. The video on their website sealed it.

gyvel
August 18, 2011, 02:38 PM
Yes, the Regent R100, made in Turkey by fine craftsmen.

I made the mistake of buying one based on the "glowing" reports in the American Rifleman, touting the "strict NATO specs" used in the manufacture, etc.

What I got was a big POS with crudely cast parts that exhibit a LOT of hand fitting, and a slide that is so loose on the frame, it makes the worst WWII beater seem like a Gold Cup. In addition, the disconnector was causing the slide to hang up during return to battery and also not allowing the hammer to thumb cock at times. The pistol was clearly unsafe so I ended up replacing all the internals, except the trigger which is an odd size whose opening isn't big enough for a standard 1911 trigger.:barf:

It sits under the front seat of my pickup now.

Lotta lessons learned from this mistake.:cuss:

Nushif
August 18, 2011, 04:51 PM
What I got was a big POS with crudely cast parts that exhibit a LOT of hand fitting, and a slide that is so loose on the frame, it makes the worst WWII beater seem like a Gold Cup.

You know ... something struck me here.

"parts that exhibit a LOT of hand fitting," ... it was probably a bad gun, no doubt, but isn't hand fitting supposedly a good thing? O.o

TonyT
August 18, 2011, 05:05 PM
The photo you attached is of such poor quality that it is impossible to determine any significant features. Cell phones do not provide good photos for e valuation.

Jim K
August 18, 2011, 07:49 PM
At one time, "hand fitted" was a sign of qualilty, and it still is when done by some master craftsmen. But the buyers of such products recognize that their guns will have to be serviced by the same very expensive workers or by others similarly skilled and expensive. There are no "drop in" parts.

For a supposed factory product, it is not good, since it means that the parts interchangeability achieved by factories a century and a half ago no longer applies; there is no guarantee that a replacement part will work or can even be made to work properly in place of a hand-fitted part working with other hand-fitted parts.

In countries with low levels of technology and low wages, it is often much cheaper to hire hand workers than to buy precision machinery and tooling, and that seems to be the case with Turkey, as it once was with Spain. The cost saving is passed on to an extent so the product is cheap - until an American gunsmith, who does not work for $2 a day, has to replace that hand-fitted part.

Jim

PT92
August 18, 2011, 08:39 PM
Had mine for a few months now ($340 NIB) and its been a great entry-level no frills 1911A1. I have to agree with the American Rifleman review on this one. IMHO, it at least reaches the durability/quality of the Phillipino 1911's.

And don't underestimate the quality of the Turkish imports across the board including my buddy's reasonably priced shotgun for example.

Nushif
August 19, 2011, 02:10 AM
In countries with low levels of technology and low wages, it is often much cheaper to hire hand workers than to buy precision machinery and tooling, and that seems to be the case with Turkey, as it once was with Spain. The cost saving is passed on to an extent so the product is cheap - until an American gunsmith, who does not work for $2 a day, has to replace that hand-fitted part.


I dare say you have probably never been to Turkey. Unskilled craftsmen? Two bucks a day? Low Tech? Where are you getting this? FO-...

In any case, before I say any more. Sad to hear you got a bad gun.

WNC Seabee
August 19, 2011, 07:43 AM
Had mine for a few months now ($340 NIB) and its been a great entry-level no frills 1911A1. I have to agree with the American Rifleman review on this one. IMHO, it at least reaches the durability/quality of the Phillipino 1911's.

And don't underestimate the quality of the Turkish imports across the board including my buddy's reasonably priced shotgun for example.
Which hits harder, the 1911 or MacInnis' slapshot?

wow6599
August 19, 2011, 08:04 AM
If you ever want to sell the MacInnis banner let me know...........I bleed blue.

PT92
August 19, 2011, 08:04 AM
Which hits harder, the 1911 or MacInnis' slapshot?
Yeah--I was there that night when they retired Al's #2 Jersey. What a player and gentleman he was (glad he plays a major role in the Blues Organization still today).

I find the full-size 1911A1's kick to be very tolerable compared to some of the compact models.

-Cheers

PT92
August 19, 2011, 08:36 AM
Yeah--I indeed treasure that banner. I think this will be our year provided:

1) no major injuries
2) they get bought

Let's Go Blues!

Hunterdad
August 19, 2011, 01:46 PM
I love my regent. It gets used every week for my pistol league. I've done just a couple of things to it.

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r197/adam11082/2011-06-24_17-56-37_741.jpg

Cop Bob
August 19, 2011, 03:39 PM
You know ... something struck me here.

"parts that exhibit a LOT of hand fitting," ... it was probably a bad gun, no doubt, but isn't hand fitting supposedly a good thing? O.o
Yup,, if the "Craftsman" doing the fitting has a clue...

gyvel
August 20, 2011, 12:29 PM
"parts that exhibit a LOT of hand fitting," ... it was probably a bad gun, no doubt, but isn't hand fitting supposedly a good thing?

Yes, it used to be. In this case it was it was "fitting" for the sake of trying to make the parts work.

This isn't the first Turkish POS I have had the misfortune to own. I had a Sarsilmaz 12 ga that was a jam-o-matic as well.

Oh, well, live and learn.

Onmilo
August 21, 2011, 05:24 AM
Hand fitting on a gun that is supposed to employ a majority of precision cast parts in this day and age is NOT a good thing.

The whole concept of precision casting is to allow the assembly of component pieces without the need for "hand fitting",,,,

Janos Dracwlya
August 21, 2011, 02:36 PM
One of the gunsmiths I have work on my guns carries a Regent. I know he's replaced at least a lot of the parts, but I don't know whether that was because the internals were of poor quality or he just wanted to customize it.

PT92
August 21, 2011, 02:48 PM
One of the gunsmiths I have work on my guns carries a Regent. I know he's replaced at least a lot of the parts, but I don't know whether that was because the internals were of poor quality or he just wanted to customize it.
I must admit that I don't personally know of someone that owns one besides myself (by know, I mean non-cyber like entity), but I know that mine as well as many other owners Regent 1911s have been just fine (this applies to people that I do personally know in my are that use Turkish shotguns at my trap range).

I just think there are lemons in every lot of everything that is produced everywhere in the world.

-Cheers

orionengnr
August 21, 2011, 11:12 PM
I just think there are lemons in every lot of everything that is produced everywhere in the world.
Yep, but it is the percentages that count. One of 100 isn't great, especially if you are only selling a few hundred or a few thousand of them.

One bad one out of ten thousand...them's bettin' odds. :)

PT92
August 22, 2011, 07:21 AM
Yep, but it is the percentages that count. One of 100 isn't great, especially if you are only selling a few hundred or a few thousand of them.

One bad one out of ten thousand...them's bettin' odds. :)

True--Not to play Ralph Nader (for those of you on the board that are old enough to know who he is), but I wonder if there's a "Legitimate" web site that reports return percentage, replacements, etc. for all of the gun manufacturers out there?

-Cheers

Jim K
August 22, 2011, 09:00 PM
Hi, Nushif,

My comments were not intended as an insult to Turkey or the Turks. But the fact is that today, in moderate price production guns, "hand fitted" is not a good recommendation. I did pull the $2 a day out of a hat because that was what workers who "hand fitted" Spanish guns a while back made. When a part broke on one of their guns, the factory shipped what amounted to a lump of forged or cast steel and an American gunsmith (at $20 or more an hour) had to file and fit the part. There were a lot of very unhappy customers when they got the bill.

If Turkish factories are now using CNC machines and turning out absolutely interchangeable parts, good for them. But then no one would call their guns "hand fitted", would they?

Jim

If you enjoyed reading about "Unknown 1911" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!