Speed Strips vs Speed Loaders


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Lawdawg45
August 24, 2011, 07:29 AM
I think anyone who has read my posts knows that I'm an advocate of carrying at least 2 reloads with any gun I carry, and I must admit that with a revolver it's been exclusively Speed Loaders (with the exception of my SA's). I recently traded a Sheriff's model Vaquero for a Nickel plated Chiefs Special and it had an older, fatter model of Pachmayr combat grips on it that made the Speed Loader impossible to use, so I purchased a set of Speed Strips for it. I have to say that with very little practice I have been able to reload almost as fast as with the Speed Loaders and they are much easier to carry. I've ordered a custom leather pouch to carry them in, and I may even try them in some of my larger revolver calibers. Guess you can teach an old Lawdawg new tricks!:D

LD45

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PabloJ
August 24, 2011, 08:17 AM
I bought set from Bianchi just to have extra 12 flat instead of pocket of rounds or bulky speed loader. I concede if I face guy with Glock and miss with first six he will most likely killl me.

artee
August 24, 2011, 08:19 AM
I've only used speed strips or a speed loader with a S&W 28, but I agree with you, a speed strip is almost as fast. I like how flat a speed strip is compared to a speedloader also (of course, with a N Frame, that's a bit pointless...). I think that under pressure you will make more mistakes/take even longer with a speed strip compared to your range reload times than with a speed loader. But, it's got to beat dropping them on the ground one at a time!

PabloJ
August 24, 2011, 08:28 AM
I've only used speed strips or a speed loader with a S&W 28, but I agree with you, a speed strip is almost as fast. I like how flat a speed strip is compared to a speedloader also (of course, with a N Frame, that's a bit pointless...). I think that under pressure you will make more mistakes/take even longer with a speed strip compared to your range reload times than with a speed loader. But, it's got to beat dropping them on the ground one at a time!
I had Model 27 with shot barrel but sold it because it was so heavy and slow to draw. I like Model 12-2 2" much better. Strip or two in pocket is just for peace of mind but I would not probably have chance to reload if the chips were really down. I concede that Glock pistols made revolver obsolete just like modern semi-auto shotguns did that to ole' pump.

EMC45
August 24, 2011, 08:39 AM
I have speed strips for my .38s, .44 Special and .32 wheelguns. Beats carrying a large round speedloader. I have the Bianchi and the Tuff Products strips.

CajunBass
August 24, 2011, 09:01 AM
I've got a couple of speed loaders, but they're for grins and giggles.

I carry speed strips.

reppans
August 24, 2011, 10:27 AM
I use a loading block and speedloader at the range and speed strips for CCW.

I saw an interesting YouTube vid that mentioned that you should get in the habit of always rotating the cylinder clockwise as you load (by hand or speedstrip). The reason being that if you run out of time and need to shoot with less than six, the bullets will at least be the right place to close the cylinder and shoot.

ForumSurfer
August 24, 2011, 10:58 AM
I have to say that with very little practice I have been able to reload almost as fast as with the Speed Loaders and they are much easier to carry. I've ordered a custom leather pouch to carry them in, and I may even try them in some of my larger revolver calibers. Guess you can teach an old Lawdawg new tricks

Lawdawg, I remember we discussed this in another post.

I viewed the strips to be just as fast as the speed loaders with practice, as well. I though it may have been the fact that I felt clumsy with the speed loaders as I am just starting to practice serious defensive drills with revolvers seriously. Thanks for voicing your more experienced opinion on the matter. Always interesting to hear others' opinions...particularly those more experienced and practiced than I!

Lawdawg45
August 24, 2011, 11:09 AM
I also forgot to mention that the speed strips allow you to "top off" after firing less than 5 rounds, which the speed loaders aren't able to do. I am curious, do they make strips for the new 8 shot S&W's? I swear that if I was still on the road, I'd carry one of these beauties in a 6 inch barrel with a tac light on the rail!;)

LD45

Tallinar
August 24, 2011, 01:13 PM
The sheriff's model you traded off - was it the birdshead one that you previously carried? :(

Lawdawg45
August 24, 2011, 01:57 PM
"The sheriff's model you traded off - was it the birdshead one that you previously carried?"

Sadly it was, but I traded it to one of my retired LEO friends who was my firearms instructor in the academy and he's also just starting in CAS, so it was good knowing it was going to an owner who loved it! With my Arthritis it was hard using the Birds head grips, but never fear it will be replaced by a Sheriff's model with full size grips.;)

LD45

Standing Wolf
August 24, 2011, 04:18 PM
I've got a bunch of speed loaders I wouldn't even consider carrying any more. Speed strips won, as far as I'm concerned.

Scipio Africanus
August 24, 2011, 05:01 PM
I am apparently bucking the trend, but I am firmly in the speedloader camp.

Rexster
August 24, 2011, 05:25 PM
I used to use speedloaders more than now. Speedloaders are bulky, and I found that rather than wear a speedloader pouch on the belt, it was more expedient to wear another whole revolver. With revolvers the size of the SP101 and downward, wearing two or three concealed is not difficult at all. Speed Strips are my preferred method of carrying spare ammo when I am carrying multiple revolvers. If carrying only one revolver, I am more likely to add a speedloader to the equation.

Speed Strips are a very efficient way to carry spare ammo, but not as fast for reloading as speed loaders. Life is full of compromises, and some compromises are good ones.

Remllez
August 24, 2011, 06:43 PM
Speed loaders, I find them bulky and a pain to carry. Speed strips make carrying much easier. I'm not fast with either to be sure but the strips win for comfort.

beatledog7
August 24, 2011, 07:21 PM
Speedloaders strategically located around my residence and vehicle (along with mags and shotshells), speedstrips for carry. Exception is woods carry where concealment is not an issue.

sixgunner455
August 24, 2011, 08:14 PM
Speed strips are good, flat, and convenient. I like them better than daily carry of speedloaders when I am carrying concealed, but if I am open carrying (hunting, etc), then speedloaders are better - they're faster.

The Lone Haranguer
August 24, 2011, 08:35 PM
I also like speed strips better. They are much flatter than speedloaders, which must necessarily be the same diameter as the revolver's cylinder. One place they fit very nicely in is a blue jean watch pocket. :) One problem I had was losing them. To keep my practice as realistic as possible, I would toss them after filling the cylinder and not look where they went. On soft ground or grass they were difficult to find sometimes. :D

Jeff H
August 25, 2011, 09:20 AM
Speed loaders for gun games, Speed strips for carry.

Deaf Smith
August 27, 2011, 07:54 PM
Best bet is to pack a second wheelgun.

Say for CCW carry a 2 1/2 M66 .357 and a J .38 as the 'reload'.

Or a S&W 2 inch M10 and a Centennial.

But if you are worried about a fast reload, that's the fastest way to go.

Deaf

jon86
August 27, 2011, 08:07 PM
I carry both! Usually one or two speedloaders in weak side pocket, and a speed strip in back pocket. I am faster to reload with a speedloader, but if I ever need to just top off 2 or 3 rounds I can use the speed strip.

ACP
August 27, 2011, 09:53 PM
I've used and carried both for many years.

I'm much faster with a speed loader. The little ones for J-frames aren't that big and take up very little space in the cargo pocket of shorts or pants. But I usually carry a Bianchi Speed Strip because it lays very flat.

BTW, after pondering this issue for a year or two, I recently bought another S&W 642 to carry in my left front pants pocket to complement the one in the right front pocket. It's the fastest "reload" I know of.

And I still carry spare ammo.

Lawdawg45
August 28, 2011, 09:42 AM
"I've used and carried both for many years.

I'm much faster with a speed loader. The little ones for J-frames aren't that big and take up very little space in the cargo pocket of shorts or pants."

The problem is that if it has an after market combat grip, speed loaders won't work, hanging on the grip.:(

LD45

Lucky Derby
August 28, 2011, 07:18 PM
I use a loading block and speedloader at the range and speed strips for CCW.

I saw an interesting YouTube vid that mentioned that you should get in the habit of always rotating the cylinder clockwise as you load (by hand or speedstrip). The reason being that if you run out of time and need to shoot with less than six, the bullets will at least be the right place to close the cylinder and shoot.
wouldn't that depend on whether you were shooting a S&W or a Colt?

BullfrogKen
August 28, 2011, 11:41 PM
The problem is that if it has an after market combat grip, speed loaders won't work, hanging on the grip.

They do when you remove material from the left side of the grip. I've taken dremel tools to the grips of all the revolvers I carry when they interfere with a speedloader. Those nice, hand-filling Pachmayr's do a great job letting you get your hand on the gun for a full firing grip.

But they do interfere with the clearances needed for a speedloader. You don't really need all that material there. Just get rid of some of it.

We bevel mag wells on stock 1911's, and take metal off to drop in a beavertail grip safety or to dovetail in a better set of sights. Removing a bit of rubber from an aftermarket grip is nothing to lose sleep over. If you don't like it when you're done, you can always replace it.

Lawdawg45
August 29, 2011, 02:15 PM
Just an update. My custom leather pouch for the speed strips just arrived from Simply Rugged and it's beautiful. I would recommend these folks in a heart beat, their web address is simplyrugged.com, check them out.;)

LD45

scottishclaymore
August 29, 2011, 07:11 PM
I personally am currently at an under three second reload using Safariland Comp II's, and I've never been able to get anywhere approaching that fast with a speed strip. So I use the Comp II's for daily carry, but also carry a speed strip in my pocket as a backup. I've found the Safariland Split 6 carrier work great under an untucked button-up shirt or polo.

Lawdawg45
August 30, 2011, 09:19 AM
"I personally am currently at an under three second reload using Safariland Comp II's, and I've never been able to get anywhere approaching that fast with a speed strip."

No arguments from me, but my arthritis pretty much dictates that I use the larger combat grips and the speed loaders do not work with these. As a LEO in the wheel gun era, I carried 4 speed loaders on my duty belt and 4 more in the car, so I can appreciate your reply.;)

LD45

scottishclaymore
August 30, 2011, 09:21 AM
Lawdawg45 - Makes sense. You definitely have to work with the tools that fit your situation the best. Out of curiosity, do you use the Tuff or Bianchi speed strips? I own both but I have found the Bianchi to be a pinch faster in my opinion. YMMV.

BullfrogKen
August 30, 2011, 10:27 AM
Lawdawg45 - Make it fit.

It's your tool. Relieve material from the grip until you have enough clearance. Don't sit there and let yourself be stuck with a self-imposed limitation. Make the tool work for you.


Seriously. I've taken my Dremel tool to $80.00 custom Eagle hardwood grips so I have generous clearance for a speedloader.

Lawdawg45
August 30, 2011, 11:12 AM
scottishclaymore, I actually have both. I initially purchased Bianchi but my Custom Leather pouch came with Tuff.

Ken, thanks for the suggestion. Just wondering how the Dremel would do on the plastic/rubber type grips? Perhaps I could find wooden combat grips to work on first.

LD45

BullfrogKen
August 30, 2011, 11:20 AM
Works just fine. It can make a mess though; it grinds off into a fine powder. I relieved the top left side on a set of Pachmayr Presentation J-frame grips nearly down to its metal skeleton. Probably looks a little unsightly. But I don't care much how it looks. It's a tool. It needs to work well, not look well.

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