A tale of fancypants dies--now with questions!


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Shmackey
August 24, 2011, 05:43 PM
Does anyone know the real differences between the Redding Competition Three-Die Rifle Set (http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/default.aspx?productNumber=792423) and the Redding Type S Match Bushing Three Die Rifle Set (http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/default.aspx?productNumber=357095)?

My .308 dies are currently a hodgepodge of dies from different brands, none of them using bushings. I'm looking for a set that (1) will let me accurately neck size most of the time, (2) will let me accurately bump the shoulders and adjust the body when needed, and (3) will let me very accurately seat bullets.

Redding makes great dies, but if another company makes something as good at a lower price, I'd be interested in that too. Either way, I'd definitely like to know what differentiates the die sets linked above. Thanks!

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Shmackey
August 24, 2011, 05:45 PM
(Hmmm ... Maybe the only difference is the micrometer on the neck-sizing die included in the Competition kit?)

Shmackey
August 24, 2011, 06:00 PM
Hmmm hmmm .... According to the review on this Midway page (http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/default.aspx?productNumber=389298), the Hornady bushing-based neck sizer automagically bumps the shoulder for you. I wonder if if gives you any control over when and how.

ranger335v
August 24, 2011, 07:47 PM
"I wonder if (the Hornady neck die) gives you any control over when and how. "

Yeah. Screw the die up or down in the press. ??

Shmackey
August 24, 2011, 07:59 PM
"I wonder if (the Hornady neck die) gives you any control over when and how. "

Yeah. Screw the die up or down in the press. ??

I mean independent of what it does to the neck.

1858
August 24, 2011, 08:46 PM
(Hmmm ... Maybe the only difference is the micrometer on the neck-sizing die included in the Competition kit?)

Yes, the difference is the micrometer on the neck sizing die. I buy Redding Competition die sets for every rifle that I reload for if they're available. If you load more than one type of brass and bullet for a rifle as I do (three different cases and four different bullets for my .308 Win rifles), the micrometer on the neck sizing die is very convenient. If you want to talk about expensive dies, take a look at the Redding Competition Die set for .338 Lapua Magnum! :what: I just ordered a set from Midway last week.

243winxb
August 24, 2011, 09:12 PM
The Competition Bushing Neck Sizing Die has a sliding sleeve that moves upward, guiding the brass into the bushing. Plus a micrometer adjustment of the bushing position. The Type S neck size only does not have a sleeve or micrometer adjustment of the bushing position . Look at the Type S that full length sizes with the bushing die, less work.

1858
August 24, 2011, 09:20 PM
The Competition Bushing Neck Sizing Die has a sliding sleeve that moves upward, guiding the brass into the bushing. The Type S neck size only does not have a sleeve. Look at the Type S that full length sizes with the bushing die, less work.

That's right, there's a sleeve to help keep the neck concentric with the case body ... I'd forgotten about that.

I like the control of bumping the shoulder back in one step and then neck sizing in another step. It doesn't add much time to the process since neck sizing is very fast. Redding's Competition Shellholders work really well in conjunction with the body die ... if the brass is properly annealed that is.

243winxb
August 24, 2011, 09:23 PM
see my edit above #7 post

Walkalong
August 24, 2011, 09:24 PM
Forster makes dies just as good at a lower price. The only difference in the die sets you linked to is the sizer on one has the micrometer adjustment.

The Competition Bushing Neck Sizing Die has a sliding sleeve that moves upward, guiding the brass into the bushing. The Type S neck size only does not have a sleeve. Look at the Type S that full length sizes with the bushing die, less work.Dang it, missed that. :)

fguffey
August 25, 2011, 07:50 AM
Shmackey,

"My .308 dies are currently a hodgepodge of dies from different brands, none of them using bushings. I'm looking for a set that (1) will let me accurately neck size most of the time, (2) will let me accurately bump the shoulders and adjust the body when needed, and (3) will let me very accurately seat bullets"

You have just described my dies, I would be taking a liberty in exaggeration to call them hodgepodge, because for the most part the box matches the brand and the dates on the dies match, all of my dies are versatile, my full length sizer dies sizer dies size cases for short chambers, .012 thousands shorter than a minimum/full length case to infinity beyond a field reject length case in increments of .001 thousands (that area includes neck sizing).

All of my seater dies are micro adjust, my seater dies are adjusted to a transfer,

Methods and techniques: Some surround them self with nice to have tools, some sell nice to have tools, I never know which of the two is the loudest, I take a measurement from the chamber, to a transfer, to the seater die and back to the chamber, nice to have tools would be in the way, nice to have does not mean must have.

And the companion tool to the press, the feeler gage, for me the feeler gage is a must have tool, Redding call the Feeler gage a thickness gage, it is most helpful for those that make adjustments then want to verify, I am a big fan of verify, not a term or practice used by reloaders, if I am going to verify why not set the tool/die up with a transfer/standard 'the feeler gage'.

F. Guffey

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