Why Redding Turret


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RE-15
September 1, 2011, 07:40 PM
What do you need 7 holes for on their turrent press? Seems like this would slow you down indexing through all them.

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Eb1
September 1, 2011, 08:25 PM
Maybe you have two or three rifle cartridges to load, and you have your dies set perfect. Why switch them out all the time with a single stage? Why not leave them in the press?

Makes sense to me to have seven holes in a turret press. Just saying.

rfwobbly
September 1, 2011, 08:31 PM
These "traditional turret" presses are set up for a batch process. You don't "index" on this type turret. When you start an operation (say sizing) you do ALL your brass before moving to the next die, then you move to the next die and complete the operation on all the cases, and so forth. So the 7 holes allows you to keep your favorite 3 sets of dies setup and installed all the time.

loadedround
September 2, 2011, 06:47 AM
...or two sets of pistol dies plus a powder measure.

sixgunner455
September 3, 2011, 12:16 AM
You *can* index on it, but you're right, it is slower. Instead, I treat mine like it's a single stage, and do everything in batches. It's just really, really fast to change to the next step, and I don't have to adjust anything if I didn't change components from the last loading.

Eb1
September 3, 2011, 12:18 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a3R7PkPklUM&feature=related

Zotto
September 3, 2011, 07:33 AM
I bought my Redding turret after viewing the ultimatereloader vids. I index it. If i was going to batch the processes i would have stuck with the hornady single stage press (with the quick lock bushings). I just added the hornady bullet feeder die. 100 rounds in 25-30 minutes and that includes filling primer and bullet tubes.

PO2Hammer
September 3, 2011, 11:06 AM
I guess I would prefer 6 stations, but because it spins easily past unused stations, it's not an issue. It's still a lot faster than a single stage because it's faster to flip to the next station than it is to swap cases in and out.

I use my T-7 in a couple different ways. I prep some brass with just two stages (re-prime/size, flare), three for some revolver ctg's (charge at the 3rd station). With those I don't go all the way around, I just back it up to station 1 while my right hand is removing the case.

With auto cases I use 5 stations (don't need a separate crimp, but that's what I do) and spin past the two unused stations. There's no wasted time or effort because my left hand spins it while my right hand is removing the ctg and putting it in the ammo box.

With .44 spl I use 6 stations , I add a pen light in station 4 to check the powder charge. Not needed for auto cases because my overhead lights shine into the case for powder inspection, then seat and crimp in 5 and 6. I don't stop at the pen light station, just pass through it so I get a good look at the powder. I refuse to seat a bullet without looking at the powder. (OK, I'm fussy)

DC Plumber
September 3, 2011, 01:38 PM
I have one and use it to batch process. I guess it would be about the same to use a single stage with quick lock bushings, all depends on what you like. I have my 30-06 and my 45acp dies set and I leave them in. That leaves me two open holes. Quick frankly, straight was rimmed revolver cartridge dies are so easy to adjust, that it isn't an issue, but for more sensitively sized and crimped cases, such as those mentioned, it works out really nice for me. But that's just me.

RE-15
September 3, 2011, 01:55 PM
Looks like a strong press. I may get it for 308 I can set up all the dies, neck, lee cullet, full length, fcd and so on

Eb1
September 3, 2011, 05:21 PM
I'll admit that the Redding T-7 is going to be my next purchase if our bid on a home is accepted. The Redding T-7 for my rifles dies, and a Lee Classic 4 hole for my 44 Mag, 9mm and 32 H&R Magnum.

Can't wait.

Ian Sean
September 3, 2011, 06:26 PM
It is one hell of a press for sure.

Spare turrets are around 50-$60...not bad.

The thing is built like a brick.....um...your great-grandkids will be reloading on it.:D

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