Should I Pay Someone To Reload For Me?


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Mike1234567
September 14, 2011, 02:38 PM
1. I'll never shoot enough to pay for pricey reloading equipment.
2. I'm not really interested in reloading.
3. I'll have no more than 3-4 calibers that make reloading fiscally sound...
.... (.375 H&H Mag, .458 SOCOM, .300 Blackout, .45-70 Govt.)
4. I've already stockpiled most calibers of ammo I want to store but none in these because of cost/round.

The 4 calibers I listed in #3 are the only ones which are all that pricey to buy in factory loads costing from $1+ to $4+ each round.

Assuming I want a minimum of 500 rounds each (preferably 1000 rounds), are there folks who will reload for others for reasonable cost? Of course, I'd want great care given to avoid serious problems.

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Jimfern
September 14, 2011, 02:48 PM
Just bite the bullet and buy ammo when it's on sale. The piece of mind you have from that is well worth any savings you might see from paying someone to reload for you, assuming you could find someone who would.

I reload as a hobby. I doubt I actually save much money by reloading.

Quoheleth
September 14, 2011, 02:49 PM
Short answer - NO. Not unless they are licensed and bonded.

You don't know what he knows, his QC, or his skill level. Why risk your eyes, face, hands, or even life?

Q

biga972
September 14, 2011, 03:01 PM
I would never shoot some one elses reloads.....plus I do not think it is legal for one one to make ammo for resell with out the right insurance and lic. to do it.


How do you know what components where used. Not a good idea.

Sam1911
September 14, 2011, 03:11 PM
Manufacturing ammo for sale requires a Type 6, 7, or 10 Federal Firearms License.

Do not pay someone else to reload ammo. That's encouraging them to break federal law, as well as putting you at some pretty unpleasant risks.

Mike1234567
September 14, 2011, 03:21 PM
I appreciate the answers, folks. I feel a bit silly now but better a bruised ego than to make a huge mistake.:o

Sam1911
September 14, 2011, 03:34 PM
Brusied ego? Naaahhh. This stuff isn't intuitive -- and much of the law is absurd to the point of nearly offensive to a "free" people.

But it's the law, you know? :rolleyes:

Mike1234567
September 14, 2011, 03:37 PM
Yeah, I know. My damaged ego is my own fault. I could have researched a bit before asking in open forum. Woodakoodashooda... oh well.:)

RandyP
September 14, 2011, 04:27 PM
Cabelas sells Ultramax reloads, several online sources offer federally licensed reloads. They are about the only ones I would ever use other than my own.

For discount ammo Herters is offering their stuff in your choice of brass, steel or aluminum cases.

General Tso
September 14, 2011, 04:34 PM
Yes if they are a close personal friend that you trust.

Quoheleth
September 14, 2011, 04:39 PM
Hey, Mike - don't be too hard on yourself. Live & learn.

Q

sixgunner455
September 14, 2011, 05:06 PM
I don't save money reloading. I get to shoot more for the same money I would have spent otherwise.

gamestalker
September 14, 2011, 05:13 PM
1. Is it Illegal to reload for someone else and then sell it to them?
E-mail Douglas Little attorney at law: doug@armedpersonaldefense.com
He is a certified expert in all areas of guns, ammo, and personal defense, and the laws that pretain to them. According to him and contrary to what I've understood, he informed me it is not against the law to relad for someone aside form the risk of being held responsible in a civil law suit. As for the limitations he didn't specify. However, my question that was presented to him was can I offer load developement as a business entity without an FFL of any type. His answer was yes you can.
2. Should I ask someone else to reload for me?
Answer: I have shot someone else's reloads on a couple of occasions and only becasue they were given to me. On both of those occasions the ammunition didn't perform normal and either stove piped or was producing excessive pressures. In any case, just because someone has a press and the other related reloading tools of the trade doesn't indicate what level of skill or attention to critical detail they hold to standard.
3. Reloading my own would not be cost efective because of the expense of getting set up.
Answer: Assuming you will be involved in the sport for some years to come the savings will off set the setup expense. Most rifle dies are generally in the $25 range, case trimming tools per caliber is about $8-$10, a decent quality single stage press can be had for $70-$80, a reliable powder scale for around $50-$70 , HF tumbler for about $30. I don't know what factory ammunition for those cartridges you mentioned goes for but I do know you can reload quality ammunition that will likely exceed factory performance for much less than 1/2 the retail price, and shopping wisely for powder and bullets can produce an even better savings.
I shoot and load for several high powered rilfes of which one is the 7mm RM. For me to load a box (20 rounds) of SPBT what is costing me $9.80. If I go up in quality to a Barns bullet or a simular high quality bullet the cost would be about $18 per 20 round box. Factory ranges from $45 to $65 or more for a quality round such as that. And for a standard SPBT I would spend no less than $25 for a box. Buying components in a larger quantity sold as bulk can decrease the cost of reloading significantly more. And brass if you use a neck die can last 12-15 reloadings for the 7mm RM. And I've heard that this can be extended another 10 cycles with a collet die.
In my personal opinion, I can't afford to not reload, and not just because of the savings, but mostly because I simply can't bring myself to rely on ammunition that is capable of little more than going bang when over all performance is smeting you rely on at extended distances and penetration when it counts.
I remember way back when I began reloading and at that time it was for the .270 win. My buddy argued that his premium top dollar 270 win. ammunition was the best and would out perform anything I could load. So I accepted his challenge and using a standard run of the mill Speer PSPBT loaded to middle of the road with RL19 blew right through a 5/8" piece of steel at 100 yds. He gafted at this and let one of his expensive factory premium rounds go and it dented the steel but didn't even fracture the back side. When we chronographed his ammunition it was @ 2700 fps and some change. Mine with the RL19 middle of the road was over 3100 fps.. 400 fps is significant when we need reach out and touch someone velocity. I could go on and and on about how great reloading is, but I don't think it would benefit you until you've actually loaded and shot what will ultimately be the best ammunition you've ever shot.

billyjoe
September 14, 2011, 05:14 PM
I would either get into reloading for myself or pick cheaper cartridges to buy ammo for. Unless they are already set up to load those calibers they are still goina have to charge you a good bit to load those calibers.

MMCSRET
September 14, 2011, 05:32 PM
Google "Hunting Shack Munitions". They used to load custom ammunition on a large scale, maybe they still do. The HSM brand has been around for almost 50 years. Also, there is a company in Arizona that specializes in custom ammunition, I don't have the name handy but you should find it in the adds in Rifle Magazine.

buck460XVR
September 14, 2011, 05:39 PM
According to him and contrary to what I've understood, he informed me it is not against the law to relad for someone aside form the risk of being held responsible in a civil law suit.

It's not at all illegal to reload for someone else........it's just illegal to do it for profit without the correct licensing.

I reload for my family and a few good friends. My time and the components are my donation. I shoot reloads from a few good friends that I trust. I do not shoot reloads from unknown sources or from known sources I do not trust. If I had to buy reloads I would get them from a licensed, INSURED legitimate business.

JohnM
September 14, 2011, 06:15 PM
I don't see anything wrong with having someone you knew who you trusted to know what he was doing reload some for you.
Just about everyone I know reloads their ammo, but there are a couple guys I just don't know about if you know what I mean.
So it would have to be some one you knew well.
Preferably someone you shot with.

RandyP
September 14, 2011, 06:19 PM
I am lead to understand the Federal statutes that if money changes hands? You are a business and if it changes hands for the mnaufacture of ammunition, a proper FFL IS required.

The OP asked if he could PAY someone to reload, and IMHO the answer is no. Well actually the OP could pay all he wanted to, the mope who sold him the reloads however would be on the hook to the Feds.

That and it only takes one kaboom to turn shootin' buddies into fierce combatants in a law suit.

Uniquedot
September 14, 2011, 07:31 PM
You could buy all the components and have someone you trust assemble the ammunition for you, or you could buy a reloading starter kit and all the components and store them away in a safe place in case you needed ammo in the future and couldn't obtain it.

Mike1234567
September 14, 2011, 07:37 PM
You folks are great. I appreciate all the information.

I've given a lot of thought to what caliber rifles/ammo I want on hand. Heck, the only caliber rifle I have that I listed is a .375 H&H Mag. The other three are pipe dreams until I can raise funds for them. I have many of the most common calibers now... just not these esoteric (expensive) ones.

The priciest ammo would be the .458 SOCOM followed closely by .375 H&H Mag then 45-70 and lastly .300 Blackout. The latter has recently fallen below $1 per round so it's not as big of a concern anymore. It's those $3-4 per round cartridges that are painful especially when I want to stockpile 500-1000 rounds each.

I'm choosing certain caliber firearms and stockpiling ammo for them for reasons we don't discuss on THR... in case I really need them for some unspoken reason.

06
September 14, 2011, 09:03 PM
Mike, my second son loves all the weird new calibers and carries hand cannons with those "foot long" barrels. First son carries a 30/30 and brings in all the meat they can eat. Am just a plain old '06 shooter whose rds cost about .35 each--less if I pour my own.

Hondo 60
September 14, 2011, 09:12 PM
I would NEVER shoot someone else's reloads.
Way too many variables & you have no idea how meticulous they may or may not be.

1SOW
September 14, 2011, 10:23 PM
http://www.cccammo.com/

I shot these 9mm years ago when I first started to shoot a lot. They worked fine and Art Collins equipment is impressive--his site shows the equipment. He specializes in 'Cowboy' shooting but offers many other types. He's a good Texas guy who backs up his products--or did years ago.

His remanufactured ammo prices 'were' cheaper than Walmarts, and the ammo was better. I don't know his prices now-a-days.

Reloading your own is the best way, especially if you "primarily" shoot just a few calibers. The initial costs don't have to be sky high for modest requirements.

J_McLeod
September 14, 2011, 10:55 PM
You could make friends with someone that has the equipment, and maybe they'll let you buy the dies and use their press. I wouldn't reload for anyone else, but I wouldn't mind teaching someone and letting them load their own my equipment.

Frozen North
September 14, 2011, 11:08 PM
No, because bullseye will fit into a 30-06 case.

Buying re-manufactured ammo is a whole different story.

Call me distrustful, but I really like my face and hands the way they are.

The main draw for me is that I can custom tailor loads that offer the best accuracy and performance for my particular gun. If I am just gonna shove generic whatever loads through my gun, I want the safety and consistency that modern manufacturing techniques offer in commercial ammo.

There is allot of cheap factory and milsurp ammo out there that you can count on not to destroy your gun if you are not interested in reloading.

Pat M
September 14, 2011, 11:15 PM
No. If I'm going to blow up my gun and/or injure myself, it will be with my own reloads :-/

Frozen North
September 14, 2011, 11:22 PM
A Lee Anniversary set can get you going for under $200 including the components, book, and dies.

If you are a casual center-fire rifle shooter, this may be all you ever need or want. With the prices of ammo for calibers like 7mm Mag and the like, it will pay for itself in short order. You will also tighten your groups and shoot more.

Lost Sheep
September 15, 2011, 12:53 AM
Gamestalker and Frozen North and a couple of others are right on.

Add up the retail price of all the ammunition you want to have on hand. Then add up the price of a basic handloading setup (you can get a REALLY NICE setup for under $300, $200 if you shop carefully and under $100 if your really scrimp, but those prices are without compromising on convenience too much and not compromising on safety or precision at all).

By the time you load 10 to 12 boxes of ammunition, you will likely have reached the break-even point, depending on the cartridge.

My friend loads 500 S&W, which locally here cost $3 each or $60 a box of 20 or $150 per box of 50. He could pay for a really fine setup in 4 boxes ($600- $250 for the hardware, $250 for the components -really REALLY premium bullets- and afford to pay himself $25 per hour to load for himself -no withholding taxes).

Now, if he was loading .40 S&W or 9mm he might be better off to buy from whoever supplies our local police with their training ammunition.

If I were in your situation, I might be on the fence about reloading myself or not, I would try it. Go to a gun show and see if you can get a used single-stage O-frame press (extremely rare to find a bent one) of cast iron, get a decent balance beam scale with a powder trickler and a set of dies for your most expensive caliber that is fun to shoot and a couple of loading manuals. Then try out the concept. All the other necessities can be done with expedient methods (case lube can be spread with a kitchen sponge, or fingers, for example) until you decide if this is for you or not.

If you decide it is not for you, then you are out very little, you can re-sell the gear for about what it cost you and move on with your life. But, handloading is often found to be very relaxing, gives a degree of control over your shooting impossible to achieve any other way and encourages you to a deeper appreciation and understanding of your firearms and ballistics.

Good Luck. Thanks for reading. Thanks for asking our advice.

Lost Sheep


http://www.handloads.com/calc/loadingCosts.asp

Mike1234567
September 15, 2011, 01:01 AM
I'm so tired tonight... I need to wait until tomorrow to reply to everyone.

rondog
September 15, 2011, 02:00 AM
Just be sure to save all your brass! Because someday you might decide you WANT to start reloading, and you'll wish you still had all that high-dollar brass.

scythefwd
September 15, 2011, 06:29 AM
A good starter kit is under 150. Under 200 with dies for 3 cailbers.. maybe all 4. You can load for under a dollar a round. You'll have saved enough money vs. buying the ammo by the time you hit that first 1k stockpile.

I got into reloading not because I liked the idea but to save money. I spent about 250 on my setup. Ammo tipped with nosler partitons are about 45 a box around here. I can load em up for about 15 a box. I'll break even about 8 boxes in... Only 6 more to go ;).

Handgun ammo is where it gets cheap... I figured I could do 1k rounds for my .40 for about 120 vs. buying around 250 rounds of cheap plinking ammo.

An old CH press should run you $20, a scale $15, case trimmer $4, pilots for the trimmer $3, dies $25. You can use an old case for a trickler. Powder measure $25. Thats all you need for loading though I recommend a good book and a loading block which you can make with a drill bit and a piece of left over 2x4. hodgdon posts it's load data online.

The old CH press probably will be a C style single stage press, but it handles my .30-06 cases just fine (mines a CH 204).

redbullitt
September 15, 2011, 09:45 AM
I think it depends on who you are buying it from, at least for me. My dad and I load for each other. I do not have a problem at all with it. We usually work up the loads together.

BUT I will say that I would not have a stranger do it.

amlevin
September 15, 2011, 10:06 AM
I find it somewhat funny that that some will say "Don't shoot anyone else's reloads" yet recommend HSM reloads.

I saw a Beretta 92 destroyed while shooting some HSM reloads. The frame, grip, and magazine were all broken and the entire right side of the pistol bulged out about 1/2".

So much for safe reloads just because the company's been around 50 years.

I reload for a friend and he gets the same loads and calibers I shoot. Costs me about an hour's time on my 650 to build him several months worth of pistol ammo. All he does is pay for the components. In return for my time he brings me about twice as many pieces of brass than he actually shoots (he cleans up real well around himself at the range).

Unless one is reloading "as a business" there is no prohibition against doing so for others. As for quality, back to HSM and all the other "Commercial Reloaders", they too have problems and then when you file a claim they point out the fine print on the box that says the buyer assumes all risk.

Mike1234567
September 15, 2011, 10:14 AM
You folks are helping me a lot. I do appreciate it.

I didn't want to get into reloading but you've encouraged me to take a serious look at it. One caliber I failed to mention is .500 S&W. Also, if I get a .458 SOCOM I'll probably forego the 45-70 Govt. So the list of calibers for which commercial loads "currently" cost more than $1 each are only three deep...

.500 S&W
.458 SOCOM
.375 H&H Mag

I'll be pricing components in the next few days. Hopefully, I'll be able to reload these pricey cartridges for less than $1 each. Oh boy, now I can fill up the rest of my empty ammo cans!!:D

RandyP
September 15, 2011, 11:21 AM
For Amlevin,

If you accept any payment for those reloads (including your friends just paying for the components) it is my understanding that you are indeed operating as an unlicensed ammunition manufacturer and subject to BATFE involvement?

Are you actually going to get a knock on your door? Probably not, but you still retain the liability and exposure to the potential legal hassle. IANAL just your average scaredy cat who strives to stay out of the way of lawyers and prosecutors - lol

sixgunner455
September 15, 2011, 11:56 AM
If I didn't reload, almost all of my target shooting would be done with a .22. As it is, I still shoot .22 most, but with reloading, I can actually afford to shoot other calibers.

And, my loads are usually more accurate than factory. I can't see a reason for a careful, prudent person not to reload.

Mike1234567
September 15, 2011, 11:58 AM
Randy,

What if the recipient merely provides the components and no cash is exchanged?

RandyP
September 15, 2011, 12:55 PM
The reloader could still be liable for any damages if it kabooms but I do not know if they could face a debate over 'payment' definitions with the BATFE if ever found out. I realize this starts to fall into the HIGHLY unlikely hypothetical scenarios, HIGHLY unlikely.

But highly unlikely still means that it is likely for some poor sap who gets themselves jammed up. I recall the story of a shooter who had an AR fail and go full auto for a very short burst. Yeppers - BIG time jam up with the Feds.

I'm thinking that if a person wanted to pay a stranger to reload for them on the side, the reloader might well charge enough that it would be almost less money to shoot surplus or Herters?

I dunno and at the end of the day it won't change the price of MY corn flakes one single penny. I shoot my reloads and let family member shoot my reloads. I do shoot my brother's handloads in his cowboy action firearms. I won't buy generic reloads at a gun show. What I do pleases me and I'm the only one I have to keep happy - lol

IdahoSkies
September 15, 2011, 06:31 PM
Reloading is like underwear, you need to be real comfortable with the other person before using theirs.

For the most part reloading doesn't save you money until you are a long way down the road. What reloading has done for me is help me enjoy my range time more, and I get way better accuracy out of my reloads than what I got from store bought ammo. (at least the kind I can regularly afford). And I shot more.

If you want to a) short more and/or b) get more performance from your firearm, then get into it. Otherwise just bite the bullet and buy your ammo in bulk. Cost wise you will end up somewhere the same (especially if you are like most of us and just keep acquiring more stuff so the cost hasn't really met parity yet).

Lost Sheep
September 16, 2011, 03:08 AM
I started reloading at the same instant I bought my first firearm, for I knew that I could not afford to shoot over-the-counter ammunition. But I quickly discovered that loading my own provided a tranquility that was Zen-like. Very relaxing. I found myself concentrated, focused and very calm. I enjoyed it for its own sake. I did not realize this for some time, but it did grow on me.

There is a difference between handloading and reloading. I suspect, though, that if you have to ask, you won't understand the answer. Not until you do it for a while. Or, you might get it right away. Depends on your personality.

What I recommended before still stands. If you buy your gear carefully, you won't have much at risk because resale value of loading gear is pretty stable. That applies if you give up loading or decide to switch out your equipment.

IdahoSkies is very right, partly.
Reloading is like underwear, you need to be real comfortable with the other person before using theirs.

For the most part reloading doesn't save you money until you are a long way down the road. What reloading has done for me is help me enjoy my range time more, and I get way better accuracy out of my reloads than what I got from store bought ammo. (at least the kind I can regularly afford). And I shot more.

If you want to a) short more and/or b) get more performance from your firearm, then get into it. Otherwise just bite the bullet and buy your ammo in bulk. Cost wise you will end up somewhere the same (especially if you are like most of us and just keep acquiring more stuff so the cost hasn't really met parity yet).
I got WAY past the break-even point a few years ago. Then I decided to repopulate my bench with the absolute, no-compromise best equipment for my needs. Now I have a few more years to go to meet a new break-even point. However, I don't regret it one bit. I enjoy my loading activities more now, can produce greater quantities and do it with less stress since my equipment fits me better than the stuff I bought 30 years ago when I did not really know my own mind. But I had to go through the experience to find myself. But I got there eventually.

I recommend the journey to you, too. I have read some of your other posts (hence the melon reference) and believe you have the temperament for it.

Lost Sheep

Hoppe
September 16, 2011, 03:46 AM
I reload and it is much cheeper with those cals you listed, atf.gov will give you all the info about reload for profit and the companies that can. There is an exception about loading anothers brass fyi. If you don't go the reloading route at least make sure that brass is getting used most ranges sell it as once fired if they dont save it up and sell or give it to someone that does load we always swapping stuff. If you look bet you could cut the cost by half or more reloading tho and you will always has rounds to shoot. Anyway you go good luck and be safe.

Mike1234567
September 16, 2011, 09:37 AM
Thanks, folks. I'll be researching this for awhile before buying anything. I try to be extremely careful with my decisions of what to buy regarding the best compromises for my needs at reasonable prices. This stated, I still mess up from time-to-time.

I'll probably only reload... I mean handload:)... for the priciest calibers. Heck some of those cost about $4 per round. Even if the components cost $1 per round that's a $3K savings just for one caliber to reach my goal of 1000 rounds cached.

Finding "affordable" new or good once-fired brass for .375 H&H, .458 SOCOM, and .500 Mag... wish me luck... LOL!!:D

mgmorden
September 16, 2011, 09:54 AM
I'll probably only reload... I mean handload... for the priciest calibers. Heck some of those cost about $4 per round. Even if the components cost $1 per round that's a $3K savings just for one caliber to reach my goal of 1000 rounds cached.

Then you WILL be reloading :). (no harm there - I'm mostly in the "reloader" camp myself).

What they typically mean by the difference is that a reloader is a person who does this for cost reasons. IE, I reload because I want to shoot a lot and factory ammo is expensive. I don't experiment much - I find a good working load and produce it in quantity to save money.

"Handloaders" typically aren't doing it for money savings or necessarily in quantity. They go to their benches and work up multiple batches of ammo using all sorts of different powders, charges, and seating depths (as well as with different bullets) to find the perfect balance that works best.

The handloader is on the quest for perfect ammo. The reloader is on the quest for cheap but workable ammo.

Mike1234567
September 16, 2011, 10:31 AM
Ahh... okay then I'll be "reloading" because my primary concern is saving money and having "good" ammunition. I'm not looking for "supreme accuracy". This stated, I'll do the best I can on a limited budget and with an ultra-short attention span. Sorry if I'm a disappointment, Lost Sheep.:D

amlevin
September 16, 2011, 07:27 PM
RandyP

I'm sure glad you said you aren't a lawyer. As for reloading for someone who reimburses you for components, read the rules regarding FFL's and Manufacturing ammo. One has to "be in the business of manufacturing ammo" before a License is required. I seriously doubt even a bureaucrat from the ATF could make a case for someone "being in the business" if they don't advertise, make a profit, and only do so for one or two people.

RustyFN
September 16, 2011, 09:27 PM
Reloading is like underwear, you need to be real comfortable with the other person before using theirs.

Wow reading that makes me glad I don't wear underwear. :D:neener:

To the OP. I personally would not buy reloads from anybody. I won't shoot reloads from anybody I know except a couple close friends. I also don't let anybody shoot my reloads.

Lost Sheep
September 16, 2011, 11:00 PM
Ahh... okay then I'll be "reloading" because my primary concern is saving money and having "good" ammunition. I'm not looking for "supreme accuracy". This stated, I'll do the best I can on a limited budget and with an ultra-short attention span. Sorry if I'm a disappointment, Lost Sheep.:D
Not at all, Mike.

I see that you DO discern the difference. Knowing that (and looking at your calibers) I suspect you will do both reloading and handloading before long.

Myself, I would qualify as a reloader. No shame in that at all.

By the way, welcome to loading. I have no doubt you will be ordering gear before the year is out.

Check out Kempf's Gun Shop. Sue Kempf is good people. Lee Breech-lock Classic Cast single stage press or Hornady's Breech-lock single stage will do you in fine style for those heavy caliber rounds at about 50-60 rounds per hour. If you want more speed than that, the Lee Classic Turret can triple that rate (with some practice and care).

Lost Sheep

p.s. Loading can lengthen your attention span, too. Make your teeth whiter and re-grow lost hair.

Twmaster
September 17, 2011, 01:15 AM
I'm pretty poor these days. I got my setup on a shoe-string. Factory Sales has Lee Challenger kits with the press, scale, hand primer tool, Perfect powder dispenser, funnel, primer pocket tool, case deburr tool and a few other little things I cannot remember.

This kit was $115 to my door. Add ~$30 for a set of dies and you are off to the races.

I reload 9MM, 7.62 Tokarev, 8x57 Mauser and soonly will be loading 6.5-257 Roberts.

I could not afford to shoot much if I did not have this setup.

As an example, I can load 1000 9MM cases with hard cast lead bullets for about $110. Yup, 11 cents per round.

I can load my Tokarev ammo for about $160 per 1000.

I save at least 50% by reloading.

I round up every piece of brass within reach when I visit the range.

As others here have said it's kinda relaxing time.

Mikie! Try it. You'll like it! :D

RustyFN
September 17, 2011, 11:10 AM
and re-grow lost hair.

I must not be loading enough then. :D

Missionary
September 17, 2011, 11:40 AM
Greetings
Never pay anyone to do something you can do. The day will come when you will need to load your own and when that time arrizes you better have the tools to keep yourself functioning. That is why I cast my own, reload my own & shoot my own.
Mike in Peru

Mike1234567
September 17, 2011, 12:31 PM
To start, I'll be researching equipment and supplies to reload only pricey ammo (probably at least $1 per cartridge)... but maybe I'll branch out later.:)

I don't mind spending $500 vs. $250 for a setup if it's significantly quicker and/or easier and/or more accurate. That extra $250 is minimal given the overall cost savings and... this ol' phart needs all the help he can get, LOL!!

Duztoff
September 18, 2011, 03:21 AM
Well, for what it's worth, here's the section from the ATF application for FFL (atf-f-5310-12):

"18. Do You Intend To Make a Profit from Your Business?
Yes No (If no, do not submit application)"

Therefore, IF you don't "Intend To Make a Profit" you do NOT need an FFL. Guess it all boils down to your "intentions"... :evil:

Mike1234567
September 18, 2011, 04:29 PM
After some research I'm nearly certain I'll be getting a Hornady Lock-N-Load system. I don't need speedy caliber changes. What I want is reasonable speed, ease of use, relative accuracy, reasonable total cost, and some measure of dummy-proof function.

Any caveats? Suggestions?

SharpsDressedMan
September 18, 2011, 05:55 PM
There ARE commercial reloaders, licensed and all, but check around for the reliablity and reputation of them. There is one in our area (Cleveland, Ohio), that I would trust my guns to, as they have been around for many years, and have as spotless a reputation and knowledge of loading, that few compare. I have loaded my own for over 30 years, and I occasionally load a few boxes for friends. I like my friends, so my QC is where it needs to be, but I would not want the liability of loading for the public.

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