Whats so special about Dillon?


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spclpatrolgroup
September 18, 2011, 01:07 AM
Ive been doing all my reloading on a single stage, mainly rifle. But this winter when the mercury drops I will switch to pistols indoors, so I am looking at progressive presses. Seems most people dont have that much brand loyalty, a lot of people like Lee, primarily based on price I suspect. But the people who use a Dillon seem to bleed blue, and only dillon products (Scales, Tumblers, Presses) will so. So why so much brand loyalty for Dillon, is it the quality, are they better alligned? The warrenty, I hear it is very good. The function, is it just easier to use a dillon? Unfortunatly every retailer in town has zip ties around the handle that prevent me from playing with them in the store.

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billyjoe
September 18, 2011, 01:48 AM
They make great stuff! I like my Dillon presses, dies, scales, and tumbler very much. Haven't had any problems with any of them. However i also have something made by every other manufaturer on my bench too. Some people jump into reloading head first and buy everything new and matching. I started using hand me down equipment and have upgraded or replaced things over time. I've got good deals on some things. Bought some things used and got some because it was what was availible locally when I needed it. Both of my 550's were bought used and all my dillon dies and tumbler were a part of the deal. It will all get the job done if you use it right, it's just a matter of preferance. Oh yeah and how much money you got to spend.

dmazur
September 18, 2011, 02:01 AM
I bought a Dillon 550B without really knowing much about it, other than it was supposed to be faster than a single-stage. From what I've learned since, I made a fortunate choice.

I believe I contacted the mfgr once, for a primer tube part, and the service was prompt. They wouldn't let me pay for it!

From reports, other companies have service similar to Dillon, but I'm not sure anyone has actually surpassed them. I believe this is the answer to your question. They have the best service, for the life of the press, no matter how many people own it.

I remember an account of a "test" where someone sent in a broken press that had been abused and got it shipped back in a new box, rebuilt completely, including the plastic tubes for the powder measures. (Which were simply discolored.)

I have RCBS, Giraud and Hornady equipment as well, so I don't believe everything has to be blue to be functional. :)

tlen
September 18, 2011, 02:56 AM
Check out the Brian Enos's web site & Forum if you want detailed info on all aspects of Dillon products..........
In regards to Dillon dies, they are made for progressive presses and have a larger "mouth" chamfer to allow the cases to line up easier during the loading precess. Also, their construction allows easy disassembly for cleaning without loosing settings. The only drawbacks to Dillon dies is they are considerably more expensive and they don't size as far down to the rim as other dies. If you load cartridges prone to case bulge, IE Glock .40 S&W, the bulge might not be removed during sizing.

FROGO207
September 18, 2011, 07:20 AM
The only Dillon product I own is a tumbler.I have cleaned a gazilion brass with it for over 15 years and I purchased it used. It died about 8 months ago and I purchased a Frankfort Arsenal for replacement. It just died last night with less than a year on it. In the mean time I fixed the Dillon and it works as well as ever.:D So it is a Quality thing that a lot of these folks are happy with I believe. Also the progressives are less prone to problems as my friends who own them report--I do all my loading on a single stage or turret in batches just cause I want to know what is in the casing exactly and if I weigh the charge anyway there is no real speed savings to a progressive IMHO. Yes I have worked with one friends Dillon but was unsure about the reloads till they all were gone just the same.:scrutiny:

cemjr
September 18, 2011, 08:07 AM
" Unfortunatly every retailer in town has zip ties around the handle that prevent me from playing with them in the store" At least you got to look at it up close before you buy. I bought my 650 on the recomendation of a guy that loaded ammo for resale. I couldn't be sure if he was just HYPING it because he was also a dearer of that equipment. I've been very happy with it so far, it appears to be quite well made.

EddieNFL
September 18, 2011, 08:58 AM
I have blue, two shades of green, black and red (not lee) on my benches. Hornady followed Dillon's warranty lead, proving competition is a good thing. RCBS has provided free replacement parts for as long as I have been loading (early '70s). Never had to use the other color warranties.

FWest
September 18, 2011, 09:10 AM
I have been looking at replacing a Lee with a unit that requires less tinkering and will just work. Most Dillon issues are one time problems or user errors from what I have found. They hold there value and don't seem to require user mods to function properly.
If Lee's Loadmaster wold work consistently they could sell them for 2x as well.

loadedround
September 18, 2011, 09:16 AM
Simply the best progressive presses on the market today. Dillon's Customer Service Department is simply the best in the business. You can never go wrong with a Dillon press. :)

velocette
September 18, 2011, 10:26 AM
I have a Dillon Square Deal progressive press for pistol ammo.
I bought it in the late 80s when I was shooting NRA Bullseye competition. At that time, I was going through perhaps 300 ~ 400 rds of .45acp per week of my reloads, casting my own bullets too. Today, the press is still going strong, I have conversion sets for 9mm, .40 S&W, .38/357 mag, along with the .45acp. The number of rounds loaded must be nearing the million mark. I have replaced a couple of springs, the bushings in the handle and some of the plastic pieces in the primer tubes. All the replacement parts were at no cost to me, other than the time to call Dillon. Was it worth the price?
You Betcha!

Roger

Kevin Rohrer
September 18, 2011, 12:02 PM
I don't have Hornady LNL, although I have heard lots of good things about them and seldom anything bad.

Owners of the Ponsness-Warren semi-progressive really like their presses. I don't own one because I have a Dillon and a bunch of others, but have considered it.

Lee? You get what you pay for. (not wanting to start a war)

Why do I own a Dillon 550B? I bought it when that was the only inexpensive progressive available at the time (around 1995 when it was $259).

Why did I stick w/ it?

1. The press is like a Mac computer: it just works.
2. They stand behind their products 110%.
3. Help is always just a phone call away.
4. Their Blue Press shows their commitment to reloaders, shooters, hunters, and the 2nd Amendment.
5. It is unlikely that anything will ever break or go wrong w/ any of their presses. If something does happen, it will be fixed and/or replaced for free.
6. Changing calibers on the 550 is a breeze (3-4 minutes if you don't change primer bars), but it is slower on the 650 and 1050.


This is not to say that their presses are perfect. Their 550, 650, and 1050 presses are "Swiss Army knives" that will load any metallic cartridge that fits in a 7/8x14 die, but that versatility comes at a price. The presses are bulky and the long throw of the handle is a minor pain. I just added a Strong Mount to mine, and the pains have pretty much disappeared.

RustyFN
September 18, 2011, 12:09 PM
I don't bleed blue but I do have a Dillon 550 that I like. It's a quality press, runs smooth and has a great warranty. I also own a Lee classic turret press that I like and still use. The classic turret is also a quality press.

Kevin Rohrer
September 18, 2011, 12:16 PM
Dillon Storytime

Last week I was at a local gunshow shopping for boolits and an old-style Ruger Vaquero (bought both at great prices). :)

I was wearing my blue Dillon t-shirt and it was like old-home week. People I didn't know came up to me and started waxing poetic about their Dillons. One guy even asked me if I was a company rep. These presses are extremely popular w/ reloaders, and those who don't have one talk about them wistfully. :(

I also talked to a guy why buys and sells used presses. He said he almost never gets one and when he does (their owners are probably deceased), they go for big bucks. :what:

Uniquedot
September 18, 2011, 02:13 PM
Whats so special about Dillon?

From what I've gathered-----

(1) Advertising.

(2) Quality control.

(3) Warranty.

(4) Overbuilt engineering.

(5) Baby blue paint.

Perhaps I'll pick one up someday.

Kingcreek
September 18, 2011, 03:00 PM
my 2 Dillon progressives are worth more today used than I paid for them new. I have managed to break or wear out a few parts in 25+ years of reloading but the tech support and warranty service is great.

dogrunner
September 18, 2011, 03:19 PM
They WORK!

Olympus
September 18, 2011, 03:20 PM
How does the saying go? You can tell a Dillon man...but you can't tell him much.

oneounceload
September 18, 2011, 03:42 PM
Whats so special about Dillon?

Nothing that you can't get from the other major makers of QUALITY products (LEE excluded) - Hornday, RCBS,etc. all make excellent equipment as well

HK SD9 Tactical
September 18, 2011, 04:03 PM
Nothing that you can't get from the other major makers of QUALITY products (LEE excluded) - Hornday, RCBS,etc. all make excellent equipment as well
Agreed.

dbarnhart
September 18, 2011, 04:43 PM
I have a rainbow of colors on my reloading bench. Though my progressive press is a Hornady, I also have a couple pieces of Dillon equipment. In one of my freshman engineering classes at college a zillion years ago, the point was driven home to me that every design is a compromise between multiple factors. The designer decides which factors are the most important and then creates a design that favors those factors at the expense (do one degree or another) of the other factors.

Each model Dillon press is clearly designed to favor a different set of factors. For example, the 650 is designed for people who will be pumping out 1500-2000 rounds of a given caliber at a time. The ease of caliber changes is less important.

The Dillon 550 on the other hand is designed to allow easier and less expensive caliber changes at the expense of other factors.

Hornady, RCBS, Lee, etc are no different. And is designed to meet a slightly different set of needs.

Me? One of the reasons I decided against the 550 (or any 4-stage press) is that if I decide to move to separate seating and crimping dies I would be SOL. I also felt that Hornady did a better job on the cost-vs-time tradeoff regarding caliber changes.

My advice would be to look at them all, understand the pros and cons of each, and then make a decision based upon what is important to you. BTW, when I was researching progressive presses, I recorded my notes and observations here:

http://www.shootandreload.com/category/choosing-a-progressive-press/

And though it deals with the Dillon 650, you may find this helpful too. A guy owned the Dillon 650, Hornady, and Lee Loadmaster for a year and used them side-by-side. He recorded his observations here:

http://www.comrace.ca/cmfiles/dillonLeeHornadyComparison.pdf

Galil5.56
September 18, 2011, 04:56 PM
Me? One of the reasons I decided against the 550 (or any 4-stage press) is that if I decide to move to separate seating and crimping dies I would be SOL. I also felt that Hornady did a better job on the cost-vs-time tradeoff regarding caliber changes.


Don't understand this... I have the seater die in station three of my 550B, taper/roll crimp in station four. I guess if folks want to use a powder lockout die then they would be SOL, but since I have absolutely no use for one, and never will, four holes works just fine for me using separate seating and crimping dies in one 550B toolhead.

Big Wes
September 18, 2011, 05:08 PM
Funny ...........No one has mention there NO BS Warranty, just another good reason to go blue!:D

GW Staar
September 18, 2011, 05:23 PM
No so funny.....RCBS has honored the same but unspoken warranty for 40 years or more. Hornady pretty much follows suit. That's not a Dillon-only thing.

I agree with HK SD9 Tactical, dbarnhart and Galil5.56.

I was where the O.P. is 3 years ago.....so I researched carefully....tried out all I could. Dillon, Hornady, and RCBS do the same thing things well, but differently. All are quality, all three companies have great reputations and warranties. There are pluses and minuses to each. While there is no such thing as a perfect progressive press, one can find a system closer to it than the others...at least for your needs, and style of reloading (what and how much you want to reload).

My search ended with the green one....it fit me the best.

Though I'll list the stuff that swayed my choice to RCBS, to help your investigation, I wouldn't suggest this press is a fit-all any more than the other brands. Only you can make the observation and discoveries that determine the best fit for you.

For Me:

Simplest design, fewest moving parts, nothing can go out of sync.
Fastest, safest primer system (I buy primers already loaded...no pecking).
Removable tool head.
Stationary, dependable, mic operated powder measure.
Strong cast iron frame.
Fastest, simplest caliber change.
Cases and bullets load from the same side (opposite the handle).


The one thing that has turned some away from this design, is the APS primer system makes it near impossible to fit a case feeder to the press. That was minor to me, since bullet feeders are simple dependable things (more trouble-free than case feeders), and speed things up just as much. I use a Hornady bullet feeder with mine.

EddieNFL
September 18, 2011, 05:44 PM
Owners of the Ponsness-Warren semi-progressive really like their presses. I don't own one because I have a Dillon and a bunch of others, but have considered it.

I have a PW and really like it for specific tasks. Massive quantities of .45ACP ain't one. It's truly more like a turret than a progressive, but a good press.

Why do I own a Dillon 550B? I bought it when that was the only inexpensive progressive available at the time (around 1995 when it was $259).

I bought a Hornady progressive around '85 or so. As I recall it was priced comparable to the Dillon (450 back then, as I recall).

No so funny.....RCBS has honored the same but unspoken warranty for 40 years or more. Hornady pretty much follows suit.

Wasn't always the case with Hornady. I had to pay for worn parts as late as 2000. RCBS wrote the book on CS.

bds
September 18, 2011, 05:53 PM
My experience and opinion of Dillon mirrors many previous comments - high quality construction, precise operation, excellent warranty and customer service etc. etc. Even their press covers are nice.

I mean, just look at the Super 1050 ... < speechless and drooling > :eek:

jack44
September 18, 2011, 05:53 PM
I bought the 550 and I had to send them the powder messue back! It did NOT have the bent washer so when I used it it would not hold the 41 grains I wanted.Also the bent rod next to the handle for the primers to fall into the cup was not bent far enough so the primers were not falling into the cup so I bent it a little more and now it works! other then thoes it works like a champ.

Hagen442
September 18, 2011, 05:59 PM
Wasted Money on some other Mfgs
Been with a Dillon for the over 4 Years.
100 % Less Headaches
Superior Workmanship over the other Mfgs I have owned
No Bull when you need some Help
Hagen

cfullgraf
September 18, 2011, 06:07 PM
Ive been doing all my reloading on a single stage, mainly rifle. But this winter when the mercury drops I will switch to pistols indoors, so I am looking at progressive presses. Seems most people dont have that much brand loyalty, a lot of people like Lee, primarily based on price I suspect. But the people who use a Dillon seem to bleed blue, and only dillon products (Scales, Tumblers, Presses) will so. So why so much brand loyalty for Dillon, is it the quality, are they better alligned? The warrenty, I hear it is very good. The function, is it just easier to use a dillon? Unfortunatly every retailer in town has zip ties around the handle that prevent me from playing with them in the store.

Two years ago I made the move to a progressive after 28 years of single stage loading. After lots of research, I ended up with a Hornady L-N-L. I like the choice and it fits my reloading style. I change calibers frequently and I prefer to tumble between resizing and reloading. The L-N-L fits this plan well although the Dillons would work as well.

After buying the Hornady and using it for a while, I decided to try the Dillon SDB. I like it as well. I do the resizing on the Hornady and reloading on the SDB. Currently only 9x19 but I am starting up 45 ACP press. My cartridge change is to change presses but I realize that is a bit extreme on the expenses.

Bottom line, most any of the progressives will work. Spend time researching the subject and this thread is a start. Lots of gun forums have reloading sections and you can learn alot just by reviewing what has been posted in the past. Others input is valuable, but don't get sucked in that it is "the be all to end all". Make your own decision.

One last note, the press mounted priming systems and I do not get along. A benefit for me since I tumble between resizing and reloading is I can prime off the press at no loss in time. I can prime 100 cases in the time it takes me to fill the primer tube and use the press mounted primer system.

After fooling with the press mounted priming systems for a couple of thousand primers, I have removed them from the presses. I did try both the Hornady and the Dillon. I had too many failures to feed, missed primers, flipped primers and jams that was taking my production rates to below my single stage level.

If i could visually check the primers at some point before seating, i would be happier.

Lots of other folks seem to have success but it seems the priming systems are the biggest source of start up troubles on the progressives.

Seedtick
September 18, 2011, 06:21 PM
spclpatrolgroup,

Check out Gavin's website. His work will help point you in the right direction.

Ultimate Reloader (http://ultimatereloader.com/)

Seedtick

:)

SharpsDressedMan
September 18, 2011, 06:48 PM
I wish I had a Square Deal B for every handgun cartridge I load (well, almost all). I have a 550B, and load many on that, but changing primer size along with a caliber changeout is annoying. Both operate reliably and give good ammo. I only load rifle ammo on a single stage RCBS Rockchucker as I do not shoot large quantities of reloaded rifle ammo, and prefer to run more precision and QC afforded by single stage. To answer the question, though, you can't go wrong with Dillon, for all the reasons given in previous posts. Worth the money, and the lack of aggravation often given by lesser reloading devices.

HOWARD J
September 18, 2011, 06:57 PM
My boys & I were shooting over a thousand rounds a week. It was driving me nut reloading all that ammo.
When Dillon came out with the 450 in early 80's ( as far as I remember) I jumped at it.
I was hitting about 350 rds. per night. In 1985 Dillon came out with the 550--I picked one up before the owner manual was printed--they talked me thru assembly on the phone & I was cranking 500 rds. per night. They have been great machines & when I lost
parts ( we moved 3 times) they shipped them free of charge.
The boys don't have time for much shooting now so I reload at my lesure on a LEE turret
press. The wife & I are paying to send one grandkid thru college---this cuts my reloading
considerably. I still manage to keep about 10000 rounds reloaded per year.

Lubricant
September 18, 2011, 07:12 PM
Remember when they sold the AT 500?I found if you bought that press,The money saved could be used to purchase a couple of powder measures,Several tool heads, and other various goodys.And Walla!A RB550 with extra stuff.I noticed they stopped selling the AT500.Wonder why?.A great press,But they are suffering from the" whe're special,so we can charge ridiculis prices for our stuff".A little plastic bin to hold bullets, twenty some bucks?. get real.:scrutiny::scrutiny:

jfrey
September 18, 2011, 07:31 PM
I did the research thing several years ago and settled on a SDB for .45 ACP loading. Smart decision on my part so far. I only had to replace a couple of small parts in the first 10,000 rounds and it runs great. So good infact, my wife bought me an identical SDB in 9mm so I wouldn't have to change dies and primer setup. In over 5000 rounds on the second press I've relubed the roller bearings (because I wanted to) and replaced one small plastic tip on the primer tube. The very few problems I had on the first press were cured with a simple phone call to Dillon. These presses just keep running and the blue stuff just seems to fit me.

My daughter-in-law's brother shoots competively with the big boys and could use any equipment he wanted. The only color he buys is blue - good enough for me.


Did I mention their NO BS warranty?

Galil5.56
September 18, 2011, 08:02 PM
Remember when they sold the AT 500? I do; seems Dillon now sells the BL 550 as its replacement.

http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/content/p/9/pid/25792/catid/1/BL_550_Basic_Loader

spclpatrolgroup
September 18, 2011, 08:57 PM
Wow lots of replies, thanks everyone. I thikn I am leaning towards the 550 at this point.

Kevin Rohrer
September 18, 2011, 09:08 PM
I thikn I am leaning towards the 550 at this point.

I had a 550B, sold it for a 650, then sold it and went back to a 550B (the one I sold). I did this as I prefer to visually check each powdered case before it gets a bullet and I advance the shellholder. Nothing against the 650, but I found it too easy to zero-charge or double-charge cases, which created problems getting back on-track. The manual advance of the 550B solved that. Greater control over the process to me means more safety.

Hondo 60
September 19, 2011, 12:42 AM
I've used cheaper presses & the extra $$ for a Dillon is absolutely worth it if you can afford it.
Obviously the kids, wife, dog have to come first.

I have an RL550B & love it's quality.
It's buttery smooth to operate, unlike the cheaper presses I've had.
And I too, like the manual advance.
If I notice a misstep in mid-stroke it's easier to fix.
But be aware that it's easy to dbl charge if you forget to advance it.

I don't want to be a Lee basher.
If that's what you can afford, it'll get the job done.
Kinda like driving a Chevy vs a Cadillac.

Once you've owned a Caddy it's really hard to go back to a Chevy.

kelbro
September 19, 2011, 12:55 AM
Two 550Bs (one for small primers, one for large), One RockChucker, and one RS3. And I like Hornady dies.

Can't really go TOO wrong if you stick with the top 2 or 3.

ku4hx
September 19, 2011, 12:22 PM
Ten years and some 100,000+ rounds later the crank on my RL550B broke. I called Dillon and followed the call up with a confirming email. The result was I got two replacements parts totally free of charge in about one week's time. I really hadn't expected that.

I called Dillon again and explained what had happened. The tech's response: "Give the extra one to a buddy".

The new unit has a grease fitting where the old one did not.

I'm a Dillon user for life.

GW Staar
September 19, 2011, 12:55 PM
As good as it is, Aluminum eventually breaks. I prefer the often accused "overbuilt" cast iron of RCBS units. As good as Dillon and RCBS customer service is...I prefer not to have to use it. My RCBS Rock Chucker has been used hard for 40 years...no breaks yet...I expect the same from the Pro 2000 frame.

kelbro
September 19, 2011, 02:47 PM
They seem to have a knack for being able to extract $200-300 from my wallet every time that I drive over there. :)

amlevin
September 20, 2011, 11:06 AM
"What's so special about Dillon?"

Just about everything. They deliver exactly what they promise. Their presses are well made from quality products. They've been in the business of Progressive Presses that they've worked out many of the kinks others appear to be "just discovering".

Customer Service is great and everyone I've ever talked to knows their stuff.

I fell into the trap of "Somebody's got to make something just as good for less money" several years ago. I tried another progressive press and it now sits on the storage shelf. There was a good reason it was cheaper.

Buy a Dillon press the first time and you won't be kicking yourself in the backside for trying to save a few bucks.

amlevin
September 20, 2011, 11:07 AM
Double Tap

spclpatrolgroup
September 20, 2011, 11:49 AM
I had a 550B, sold it for a 650, then sold it and went back to a 550B (the one I sold). I did this as I prefer to visually check each powdered case before it gets a bullet and I advance the shellholder. Nothing against the 650, but I found it too easy to zero-charge or double-charge cases, which created problems getting back on-track. The manual advance of the 550B solved that. Greater control over the process to me means more safety.

I am the same way, after using the single stage for so long, I am not ready to trust a machine to do this for me without giving things the old hairy eyeball. I don't need to be a speed deamon, I just want to not have to pull the handle and move things back and forth from the block to the press 500 times.

codefour
September 20, 2011, 01:18 PM
I am in the same boat as GW Staar, I bought a RCBS Pro 2000 and I have no regrets. I do not like that Dillon still uses aluminum as the frame material.

The Dillon Caliber Conversions are a real, royal pain in the butt and very expensive. Dialing in a slide bar powder measure sucks compared to a Uniflow with a micrometer insert as the Pro has. The Pro 2000 is much simpler.

The Dillon caliber conversions are just way too expensive and slower than the Pro 2000. Who wants to buy a toolhead, dies, caliber conversion kit, and extra powder measure (well over $200 per caliber for a 550 and close to $300 for a 650). I would rather buy more guns. The Pro requires a shell plate and tool head and dies. And you can use your old RCBS, Lee, or Hornady dies. Dillons like there own die sets at $75 each.

I have used Dillons and they were good, but do not feel any where as solid as the RCBS. Once you have used the APS strips that are preloaded, you will never go back to pecking tubes. And you can load strips just as fast as pecking a tube if not faster.

X-Rap
September 20, 2011, 01:33 PM
I have 2 550's and no regrets, I also have a number of single stage and a rainbow of colors on my bench.
I think there is a difference in who makes your dies or scale and who makes your progressive press, its apples and oranges.

kelbro
September 20, 2011, 01:47 PM
Another example of Dillon service: I took my old (1989 model) powder measure in for an upgrade to the newer failsafe design. Their upgrade kit does not work on my particular measure. Dillon's solution, 'Here's your new $81 powder measure'.

I use RCBS, Hornady, and Redding dies on my 550s. The only Dillon dies that I use are their seaters. Fantastic design for cast bullets where you get lube in the dies and have to keep them cleaned out. The Dillon design allows you to pull a clip and disassemble the die for cleaning. Don't have to touch the locknut or adjustment.

Kevin Rohrer
September 20, 2011, 01:47 PM
I do not like that Dillon still uses aluminum as the frame material.

Not meaning to start a flame war as RCBS makes excellent products, but their presses are aluminum and cast in China.

And no, I don't know where Dillon has their aluminum presses made. Maybe someone here does.

jack44
September 20, 2011, 07:33 PM
In the future I will need a tumbler hows DILLONS??

VaGunNut
September 20, 2011, 09:17 PM
Quality, No BS warranty, rugged, and exceptional resale value as used.

FoghornLeghorn
September 21, 2011, 01:26 AM
They make great stuff!

What he said. Although I use RCBS for bottleneck cases, I have a Square Deal for handgun rounds.

amlevin
September 22, 2011, 12:52 PM
codefour-

If you want to save some time and money on Dillon caliber changes don't buy a powder measure for each caliber. Just buy a powder die and another powder measure slide. You can have a powder bar, fully adjusted for each powder and caliber. Takes seconds to change them and just use the same powder measure by moving it from tool head to tool head.

For some, just about anything is a "hassle". To others, we just find solutions that work for us and move on. I won't settle for "good enough" just because it might save me a minute or two.

rfwobbly
September 22, 2011, 02:13 PM
Why I like Dillon equipment.....

I tend to use my reloading setup like most people use a toaster. My time is limited and valuable, so on the rare occasions when I can get a chance to sit down to reload, after a 3 minute adjustment period,.... the only thing I want to do is pull the handle, and the only thing I want to see is ammo pouring out the the other end.

After trying most of the brands on the market over the decades I've been doing this, I've found that the Dillon system is the only one reliable enough to make this happen for me. There are several equally accurate systems on the market now, but only the Dillon is accurate and reliable enough to make anywhere from 10 or 1000 perfect rounds with no primer jams, no power measure leaks, no linkage failures, no shell holders that decide to stop turning a full rotation in the middle of a run, etc.

There are certainly other good brands of reloading equipment. I still retain and use the best pieces off of every reloading kit I've ever owned. But in terms of the entire system (that is to say, the way the press, primer feed, powder measure and shell holder work in concert) the Dillons are the best I've ever used.



;)

GW Staar
September 22, 2011, 03:50 PM
Why I like Dillon equipment.....


After trying most of the brands on the market over the decades I've been doing this, I've found that the Dillon system is the only one [COLOR="Blue"]reliable enough to make this happen for me. There are several equally accurate systems on the market now, but only the Dillon is accurate and reliable enough to make anywhere from 10 or 1000 perfect rounds with no primer jams, no power measure leaks, no linkage failures, no shell holders that decide to stop turning a full rotation in the middle of a run, etc.

There are certainly other good brands of reloading equipment. I still retain and use the best pieces off of every reloading kit I've ever owned. But in terms of the entire system (that is to say, the way the press, primer feed, powder measure and shell holder work in concert) the Dillons are the best I've ever used.

;)

Hmmm....that sounds more like a comparison of Dillon vs. Lee to me. I load like you do....and after using the Dillon 650 and RCBS 2000 for a week, I decided to buy the Pro 2000...and for nearly the same reasons you listed.;)

Please list all those unreliable systems you tried....

Red Cent
September 22, 2011, 04:46 PM
"......I found it too easy to zero-charge or double-charge cases....."

The 650 has a case powder check assembly used in the 4th station. When I really get the rythm down and it beeps, I simply dump the powder, throw the case into the case feeder and keep on going.

I load too many rounds to check each case.

I am glad I have Dillons, but I really don't like to load that much.

I use a Frankford Arsenal vibrated primer tube feeder and I can load 100 primers in the Dillon in less than a minute. From the time I dump the primers into the Frankford.

Combine that with a Dillon ..........

joed
September 22, 2011, 07:18 PM
Ten years ago I bought my first Dillon a 550 when I started shooting 300 rounds of pistol a week. Did a lot of research before settling on the Dillon and couldn't be happier.

I've since sold the 550 and replaced it with a 650 and 1050. That says a lot for Dillon as I'm not a loyalist. If there were something better I'd have it on the bench.

You'll find a lot of Hornady owners though I wouldn't I'd go out of my way to buy one of their presses. My opinion is they're lured in by the free bullets which make the offer look more attractive.

At this time if I wanted another progressive it would be Dillon again. After owning 3 I'm very satisfied.

oldfortyfiveauto
September 23, 2011, 12:00 AM
One 550B and three Square Deals plus a variety of single stages. Dillon is hard to fault, especially their case tumblers.

codefour
September 23, 2011, 02:33 AM
As Kevin Rohrer stated:

"Not meaning to start a flame war as RCBS makes excellent products, but their presses are aluminum and cast in China."

My Pro 2000 is made of steel (at least as the owner's manuel says but possibly iron) and it also has stamped on it "Made in USA" on the frame.

The frame and ram weigh fifty pounds alone.

Kevin Rohrer
September 23, 2011, 09:00 AM
My Pro 2000 is made of steel

I am not familiar w/ this press. Is it still made?

When I said their presses are now made from Chinese aluminum, I was quoting a company official who was interviewed in a recent Handloader magazine article.

kelbro
September 23, 2011, 11:39 AM
I thought that RCBS' assertion was that some of their castings were done in China (not all of them) and finished in the USA.

highlander 5
September 23, 2011, 12:02 PM
i had a 550b that I screwed up trying to take it apart to replace one of the linkage arms that froze up. Called Dillon told them what I had done and and would pay to have it repaired. The customer service rep said send it in we'll fix it no problem. Sent the press back and 2 weeks later got it back in first class shape no charge.

drfroglegs
September 23, 2011, 12:30 PM
As someone who doesn't own a Dillon/RCBS you may find it worthwhile to completely ignore my opinion, but It's hard to justify spending $1,400 on a reloading press that a Lee Press will do for $200. I guess if I had a whole lot more money my opinion would change, but that's where it stands now.

Just my $0.02...

Hangingrock
September 23, 2011, 01:33 PM
I like the calendars, really-really like the calendars. The equipment is ok but I like the calendars. You can’t reload with a calendar but you sure can dream. Back to reality I have a 550B and (2) SDB presses. No complaints but If I was starting out I’d take a look at the Hornady progressive press. Even with three progressive presses there is still a place on the bench for a Redding single stage. I’m wondering when the 2012 calendars are going to be available?:D

GW Staar
September 23, 2011, 02:00 PM
As Kevin Rohrer stated:

"Not meaning to start a flame war as RCBS makes excellent products, but their presses are aluminum and cast in China."

My Pro 2000 is made of steel (at least as the owner's manuel says but possibly iron) and it also has stamped on it "Made in USA" on the frame.

The frame and ram weigh fifty pounds alone.

I am not familiar w/ this press. Is it still made?

When I said their presses are now made from Chinese aluminum, I was quoting a company official who was interviewed in a recent Handloader magazine article.

I thought that RCBS' assertion was that some of their castings were done in China (not all of them) and finished in the USA.

Kevin, you're not starting a flame war, you're just perpetuating a rumor that has grown and ebbed over and over. The next thread will be about how sorry RCBS is because their presses are made in China, and no red-blooded American should buy one....they don't deserve that after all they've done in the last 50 years for American reloaders.

Now I don't know about their cheap aluminum line which I wouldn't personally buy, but I did personally call an RCBS Engineer I know, the last time this rumor surfaced, and asked him point blank about the China Rumors concerning Rock Chuckers and Pro 2000's. Their heavy duty cast-iron bodies are cast and finished in their plant in California, machined by the most modern and accurate CNC equipment available...today, yesterday, since their creation.(only before the CNC equipment was invented, machining was done by hand in the same plant.) One more time...cast-iron presses, made in America. I don't know how to make that any more clear.....if you folks don't believe me call RCBS yourself and ask.

RCBS started making a cheap aluminum line a few years ago, to go after the Lee, Hornady market for those who couldn't afford more. Maybe that's the presses talked about in Handloader, I wouldn't know. If it wouldn't be too much trouble, It would be nice if a Handloader issue could be specified, if its going to be quoted....otherwise it's a rumor we can't easily verify. The aluminum presses are the RCBS Reloader Special-5, and the RCBS Partner press....I don't recommend them any higher than an Aluminum Lee press. And if I was going to buy Lee, I would get one of their two good cast-iron models.

Answering Kevin again, the Pro 2000 is RCBS's flagship progressive. A five station press with a removable tool head, best compared to Dillon's 650...except for Dillon's aluminum castings. (Why do you thing Dillon presses are so huge....they have to be.)

kelbro
September 23, 2011, 02:00 PM
The Dillon calendar girls were in the shop the other day signing the 2012 calendars. I was late getting back from lunch :)

rfwobbly
September 23, 2011, 09:55 PM
As someone who doesn't own a Dillon/RCBS you may find it worthwhile to completely ignore my opinion, but It's hard to justify spending $1,400 on a reloading press that a Lee Press will do for $200. I guess if I had a whole lot more money my opinion would change, but that's where it stands now.

Just my $0.02...

• Since the Dillon line starts with the BL550 at a list price of $259 I'd like to know where you got your price data.

• Since Dillon's only press in the quoted $1400 price range is the 8-station 1050, please explain which Lee press has similar capacity and in-press trimming capability.

EdJennings
September 23, 2011, 11:25 PM
The blue press has no equal. That said, I use Lee dies in my 550B:eek:

GaryL
September 23, 2011, 11:40 PM
Reading these posts is so much fun. :D

Seriously I am glad there are tools made in the good old US of A to a high standard of quality. More and more I'm looking at where things are made, and if made in China, I keep looking. Paying twice as much is often a bargain.

Carry on....

X-Rap
September 23, 2011, 11:50 PM
More and more I'm looking at where things are made, and if made in China, I keep looking. Paying twice as much is often a bargain.


Been nice if people would have started that about 20 yrs ago.

GaryL
September 24, 2011, 12:34 AM
Been nice if people would have started that about 20 yrs ago.20 yrs ago I had no problem finding stuff made in the USA. Now it's nearly impossible. Fortunately, most of my major tool purchases occurred a while ago.

But when the president of the country is taking bribes from China, it's no surprise he'll start pushing through rules that favor them. They didn't call him slick willy for nothing.

kelbro
September 24, 2011, 12:37 AM
Been nice if people would have started that about 20 yrs ago.

Yep. Would have saved a lot of wear and tear on my tired old body :). I set up factories for companies that have moved/are moving to China.

EddieNFL
September 25, 2011, 08:58 AM
... but It's hard to justify spending $1,400 on a reloading press that a Lee Press will do for $200.

...and a Pinto will best a 512TR.

OhioChief
September 25, 2011, 11:50 AM
My local gun store sells Dillon, and has a XL650 set up to play with (no powder or primers). So I bought one. Keep in mind that after you buy one, you will then spend an equal amount of money on all the accessories. I opened the box, saw all the parts, and put it away for a year! This past spring I fnally man'd up and opened the box. After a lot of "learning", I've got it set up for .223 with all the bells and wistles. IT's AWESOME! I cannot imagine using a single press. I have to touch each case enough as it is now, 4 or 5 more touches would just make me want to give up the hobby. I don't have any friends that reload, but all of my friends love to look at that press. Draws them in like flys to a picnic.
I did do this however; I set up a small Lee single press just to decap my brass. I wanted the pockets clean before I reset the primer. And with military brass, I need to swage them anyway. It's just easier to do on a single, than to Decap first on the Dillion. The first stage sill sizes it, just doesn't punch out the primer.

OhioChief
September 25, 2011, 11:58 AM
One other point. I ordered the wrong dies on-line. I e-mailed Dillon about how to swap them. I put them in the mail with a note saying what I had done, and what I really needed. Left my phone number and said to call me and I would give them a credit card for the shipping charges. New dies showed up a week later, zero charge, zero hassel. That's the kind of thing that makes me come back. And they have a great Q&A blog, which they monitor all the time for troubleshooting questions.

drfroglegs
September 26, 2011, 10:57 AM
• Since the Dillon line starts with the BL550 at a list price of $259 I'd like to know where you got your price data.

• Since Dillon's only press in the quoted $1400 price range is the 8-station 1050, please explain which Lee press has similar capacity and in-press trimming capability.
The super 1050 is listed as $1,600 on their website (http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/content/p/9/catid/1/pid/23877/Super_1050).

Considering most people start out the hobby to "save money" it doesn't even really make that much sense to spend $500-600 on a press unless your a competition shooter! For the typical shooter, getting a cheap press is more than enough..

I get so tired of people knocking Lee presses... If you know how to set them up, they're just as good as any press on the market (and die's are better)!

drfroglegs
September 26, 2011, 11:02 AM
...and a Pinto will best a 512TR.
Depends on your outlook in life... To me, it's dumb as hell to pay $100k for a car that will take you somewhere just as fast/effective as a $10k car...

You can't really apply that analogy to reloading. I would bet money a Lee master will run circles around most peoples presses (bullet seating die included)..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCFFpHyHyB4&feature=related

jmorris
September 26, 2011, 11:07 AM
I would bet money a Lee master will run circles around most peoples presses (bullet seating die included)..


How much money are we talking about? I'm in, you can even load pistol and I'll load rifle.


http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o213/jmorrismetal/th_1050.jpg (http://s121.photobucket.com/albums/o213/jmorrismetal/?action=view&current=1050.mp4)

GW Staar
September 26, 2011, 12:18 PM
LOL! Your Dillon 1050 with a kiss bullet feeder ain't 'xactly playing fair jmorris....ain't most people's presses, either. But sweet it is if you can afford one and a Kiss (Mr. Bullet Feeder) to boot.:D

I will grant that the Load Master can load as fast as any of the others.....when perfectly set up....for a while. The problem lies in keeping things that way. My experience (helping a good friend keep his running) has shown that it requires a constant watch, constant lubing & cleaning, or things go south fast, especially in the primer feed area and for sure the bullet feeder.....now a Kiss bullet feeder would help it just as well as it will a Dillon 1050 if you have the mon. The case feeder is not in the same league as Dillon/Hornady versions...it's a help, yes, but really it's no comparison at all. Even the simple pushing of a case into the sizer has caused my friend problems sometimes, when he let things get out of snyc. The result was mangled brass....his fault because he forces things...."if it ain't going in easy...push harder," he says.:)

All that said, knowing my own personal limitations, I won't be loading as fast as jmorris does in that video.....ever....:o Which is why I don't have to have...nor want both a case feeder AND a bullet feeder....or a 1050. Thankgoodness too, as I can't justify the cost....too big a family to feed.;) (I have to say my attitude could change with more mon and better fail-safe powder measures on the market.)

The RCBS I have doesn't require ANY syncing and resyncing...set it up the first time and its always right. That one feature makes it worth the higher than Lee prices to me. The killer primer feed system is gravy.

jmorris
September 27, 2011, 02:07 AM
LOL! Your Dillon 1050 with a kiss bullet feeder ain't 'xactly playing fair

I let my wife gamble, I bet only if I can win.

I let the "best stuff" threads go for the most part (4 pages in this case) but hook line and sinker...couldn't help it.

jmorris
September 27, 2011, 02:20 AM
The problem lies in keeping things that way. My experience (helping a good friend keep his running) has shown that it requires a constant watch, constant lubing & cleaning, or things go south fast, especially in the primer feed area and for sure the bullet feeder.....now a Kiss bullet feeder would help it just as well as it will a Dillon 1050 if you have the mon.

Another good point, zero is the point average speed goes south. Once you have to stop to shake a primer feed/ case feed your average falls, fast.

I can tell you, from owning at least one of every rifle/pistol reloading machine, every machine will have problems. Dillons have less than the others.

bds
September 27, 2011, 09:44 AM
I let the "best stuff" threads go for the most part (4 pages in this case) but hook line and sinker...couldn't help it.
I came close to getting my wife to say OK to a Super 1050 for loading the bulk of my match caliber of 40S&W after seeing one in action ... thing of beauty!

Of course, she had to ask, "But will it load more accurate match ammo?" and ruin everything! :banghead:

jmorris
September 27, 2011, 10:43 AM
I came close to getting my wife to say OK to a Super 1050 for loading the bulk of my match caliber of 40S&W after seeing one in action ... thing of beauty!


Of course, she had to ask, "But will it load more accurate match ammo?" and ruin everything!

That's funny, the one above was a gift from my wife, she said the quicker I get done the more time I can spent with her. If that's not a selling point to women I don't know what would be.

drfroglegs
September 27, 2011, 10:52 AM
Haha.. Well if price isn't an issue let's build a manufacturing plant, they're much faster :)

I'd have to agree with GW Staar, any fully setup progressive press is just as fast as any of the others.. A load master with a case feeder and bullet feeder is just as fast as your video (the limiting factor is how fast you can pull the handle).. I'm sure it's not as reliable, it's 1/5 the cost!

Going back to the original posted question, IMHO there is nothing special about Dillon. They make good presses that are just as reliable as RCBS and/or Hornady and maybe a little more reliable than Lee. Just have to find the one you like, do a cost analysis (is it really reasonable for YOU to spend $x based on how much you shoot), and go with that one.. Customer service, I'm sure, is just as good for all companies.. Take that advice for what it's worth (probably not much)..

drfroglegs
September 27, 2011, 10:57 AM
That's funny, the one above was a gift from my wife, she said the quicker I get done the more time I can spent with her. If that's not a selling point to women I don't know what would be.

I tried that on my wife, I'll let you know how it turns out... :fire:

HK SD9 Tactical
September 27, 2011, 11:06 AM
That's funny, the one above was a gift from my wife, she said the quicker I get done the more time I can spent with her. If that's not a selling point to women I don't know what would be.
I tried that and she said "what makes you so sure that I want to spend more time with you?":what::rolleyes:

bds
September 27, 2011, 11:10 AM
I tried that and she said "what makes you so sure that I want to spend more time with you?"

:D:D:D

I am to a point where I have a dedicated press set up for each caliber. Although I "prefer" a Super 1050 for high volume 40S&W production, looks like Hornady AP LNL may probably fill that role.

jmorris
September 27, 2011, 11:12 AM
any fully setup progressive press is just as fast as any of the others... I'm sure it's not as reliable, it's 1/5 the cost!

Reliable, is the key to speed. You can win if you have to pit more often. I have RCBS, Hornady and Lee presses out in the shop too, so I know they will make perfectly fine ammo and the right price for me when I picked them up. None of the Dillons are flawless by a long shot but they are simply more reliable than the others.

jmorris
September 27, 2011, 11:14 AM
.
I tried that and she said "what makes you so sure that I want to spend more time with you?"

Oh, your going to have to leard to snuggle better. Maybe take one for the team and watch a Lifetime movie or two. That should grease the skids.

Mike1234567
September 27, 2011, 11:47 AM
I tried that and she said "what makes you so sure that I want to spend more time with you?":what::rolleyes:
Then use the opposite approach. Tell her you'll be so busy reloading that she'll almost never see you.:D

Oceanbob
September 27, 2011, 12:59 PM
Our family (my adult sons and one adult daughter) shoot in various Competition Venues...sometimes running 2000 rounds per week.:eek:

Being the Dad and a reloader since 1973...we've owned ALL the machines.

The machines we 'evolved to' via trial and error and more experience than most, are the DILLON products.

Go down the line at various Gun Games and you will notice the serious, no BS, no excuses shooters are running Dillon equipment.

The other brands are OK if you're a casual plinker or range dog, but those brands simple don't hold up and need constant tuning and tweeking to keep running. :mad:

Nobody and I mean nobody has better customer service than Dillon. A life time warranty means just that. One man I know found a old 550 out behind a barn, in the grass covered with dirt and rust. He shipped it to Dillon to get an estimate to get it running; the machine came back in NEW CONDITION with everything replaced. No Charge. Incredible.

We are now running a Dillon 1050 set up in .45 auto. She can produce 1200 rounds per hour.. Also we run a 550B with case feeder (with several quik change caliber heads) and she will do 700 rounds per hour.

I would never consider reloading without a Dillon machine. If you are collecting and shooting guns because you love them; or love to tinker in your Man Cave as an enjoyable hobby....then you owe it to yourself to RELOAD.

Here is Californistan, reloading may be the only option :( to save money in the future because these mis-guided clowns in our local government want to ban internet sales of ammo and require all purchases be logged in and face-to-face. This isn't law yet, but they are working on it..(dang)

These machines are a bit more money up front, but they hold their value and will save you big money over time.

Much less expensive than my Boat, Cars and Airplane...hehehe.

Bob

http://i51.tinypic.com/2zhr33r.jpg

drfroglegs
September 28, 2011, 10:48 AM
I must admit, hearing all the reliability comments associated with Dillon has me very interested. I'm working my way through graduate school now (hence I have the cheapest presses), once I have a real job I may have to look into upgrading... I need to start shooting WAY more if I'm going to convince the wife to let me "make an investment."

Like I always tell her about her $2k paintings: if you're not going to sell it, it's not an investment...

I can just hear her throw that one back in my face! :mad:

I'm saving about $12/box, which means an estimated $800 for the press/dies/accessories will take me ~67 boxes of ammo just to make my money back.. I usually only shoot 2-4boxes a month, at least 2 years to "save the money." That's not even including the money I'll spend on the bullets/primers...

I'm a firm believer that you never actually save money reloading, just relocate it.. If it wasn't so damn addicting.....

Mike1234567
September 28, 2011, 11:38 AM
^^^ Any investor will tell you that a two-year return on your investment is excellent.

bds
September 28, 2011, 11:42 AM
Californistan ... mis-guided clowns in our local government want to ban internet sales of ammo and require all purchases be logged in and face-to-face. This isn't law yet, but they are working on it.
AB962 was defeated on 1/18/11 - http://www.crpa.org/_e/page/1597/mr01_18_2011.htm

http://calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=385930

Oceanbob
September 28, 2011, 05:43 PM
AB962 was defeated on 1/18/11 - http://www.crpa.org/_e/page/1597/mr01_18_2011.htm

http://calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=385930
Yes but they reintroduced another version of the same bill. It's only a matter of time.

Bob

EddieNFL
September 28, 2011, 07:44 PM
Depends on your outlook in life... To me, it's dumb as hell to pay $100k for a car that will take you somewhere just as fast/effective as a $10k car...

Well, you show me a 10K car that will outrun a 512TR and I'll buy a Lee.

If you're happy with cheap stuff, drive on. Just don't expect everyone else to be willing to settle.

Mike1234567
September 28, 2011, 08:26 PM
^^^ There's a difference between "don't want to" and "can't". I'm somewhere in between... except, I often "want to" but "can't". :)

jcwit
September 28, 2011, 08:31 PM
Well, you show me a 10K car that will outrun a 512TR and I'll buy a Lee.

If you're happy with cheap stuff, drive on. Just don't expect everyone else to be willing to settle.



Like we can all afford one.

joed
September 28, 2011, 08:37 PM
I will grant that the Load Master can load as fast as any of the others.....when perfectly set up....for a while. The problem lies in keeping things that way. My experience (helping a good friend keep his running) has shown that it requires a constant watch, constant lubing & cleaning, or things go south fast, especially in the primer feed area and for sure the bullet feeder.....now a Kiss bullet feeder would help it just as well as it will a Dillon 1050 if you have the mon.

Amen! And that's why I passed on the Lee. To many people told me you spend a lot of time adjusting and tinkering.

Even the Dillon requires cleaning or you'll have primer problems. I generally clean mine every 1k rounds. I've started using compressed air and just blowing the dirt out though.

I have to admit I haven't seen a press yet that holds a candle to the 1050. Mine is the older model with a shorter throw. It won't do the long cartridges but it will do 1200 an hour when I'm doing .44 or .45. I picked this one up used for $800. The only thing I regret was the seller had 2 for sale. Looking back I should have bit the bullet and bought both. Wish I could find another at that price.

The 650 is much slower in my opinion. It's rated at 800 per hour but I haven't seen it from mine. I use this one for small primer loading. Realistically it will do 500 an hour rarely stopping other then to refill primers and powder.

EddieNFL
September 28, 2011, 08:40 PM
Like we can all afford one.
Ah...

Kevin Rohrer
September 28, 2011, 09:37 PM
Joed: a shorter stroke is better in my book. Is it big enough to load 30/06?

I have never seen one in operation before. How tough is it to correct a case that didn't get powder or gets a double charge?

bds
September 28, 2011, 09:59 PM
We are now running a Dillon 1050 set up in .45 auto. She can produce 1200 rounds per hour..
1200 per hour by your wife? Dang, I gotta show my wife this post! :D

"Honey, your production rate is way below par. You now HAVE to buy us a Super 1050 so we can reach a decent production rate!" :D:D:D

Oceanbob
September 28, 2011, 11:37 PM
1200 per hour by your wife? Dang, I gotta show my wife this post! :D

"Honey, your production rate is way below par. You now HAVE to buy us a Super 1050 so we can reach a decent production rate!" :D:D:D
LOL....yep, that will fly like a lead balloon.....hahaha

jmorris
September 29, 2011, 09:58 AM
The 650 is much slower in my opinion. It's rated at 800 per hour but I haven't seen it from mine. I use this one for small primer loading. Realistically it will do 500 an hour rarely stopping other then to refill primers and powder.

With case and bullet feeders I load 500 in less than 20 minutes. Just as fast as the 1050, if you don't have crimped primer pockets.

http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o213/jmorrismetal/reloading/bullet%20feeder/feeder1.jpg

drfroglegs
September 29, 2011, 10:23 AM
Like we can all afford one.
Does it matter if a $10 kia can outrun a 512T if the speed limit is still 70mph..

Point being, each press only works as fast as you can pull the handle.... If I can pull it faster than you can, guess what?! My press is faster :)

Maybe someday when I have a real job I can entertain the idea of having a more "reliable press."

EddieNFL
September 29, 2011, 01:19 PM
No, YOU would be faster than Me; nothing to do with the press.

Again, if you're happy with a KIA. drive on. Other folks have different standards and expections.

jcwit
September 29, 2011, 05:24 PM
Again, if you're happy with a KIA. drive on. Other folks have different standards and expections.

No but a Ford will do!

http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/car/02q1/ford_gt40-first_drive_review

wr400
September 29, 2011, 05:52 PM
I klost some locater pins an Dillon sent new ones out free of charge! I love my blue press!:neener:

Strykervet
September 29, 2011, 06:17 PM
I don't have a Dillon --yet I guess. I get the catalog though, and I have read into the gear. What amazes me about the stuff they sell is that it is kind of unique. Lee, RCBS, etc., they all make similar stuff, but Dillon makes some high volume gear and a lot of specialty stuff to go along with it. The sensors and the automated feeds come to mind. You can get a Dillon press that is so automated the only thing you really have to do is pull the handle. Brass and all other components are fed into the system, loaded ammo falls out.

I still use the single stage too. Probably won't change anytime soon, I just got a new digital scale and dispenser, so that sped things up for me. I can't load what I load using a progressive anyway. But when I do get a progressive, it will be a Dillon, that is for sure.

Never really heard anything bad about a Dillon.

EddieNFL
September 29, 2011, 07:28 PM
No but a Ford will do!

http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/car/02q1/ford_gt40-first_drive_review
Not that I'll ever buy another big three, but...

http://editorial.autos.msn.com/blogs/autosblogpost.aspx?post=a5e9054c-a69d-4d41-8653-86c5238ec5bb&ocid=ansauto11

Red Cent
September 29, 2011, 07:53 PM
DrFrogLegs, I am sure you mean well but this reeks of sour grapes.

I started with a Lyman Spartan (1963). How old are you?

I went to a Lee Turret. After a while I traded for a CH progressive. Sold it and bought a Lee Pro 1000. At one time I had three 1000s going.

When I started shooting cowboy about 2000, I bought a 650. Lord have mercy. It was like going from a FIE to a Smith. Solid. Smooth. Firm. And easy.

I now have three 650s. Tempted to get a 1050. Why? Cause I can. And I love the Dillons. I have ran some other presses but I am convinced the Dillon is the premier press.

I ran a Mec 600 Jr for 40 years. Then I bought a Ponce/Warren 800 Plus. Lord have mercy. Shotgun reloading heaven.

Now if you are satisfied with an inexpensive press that puts out good ammo, great. If you have an inexpensive press, please don't tell me I should get one and save money.

Promise me something. When you land "that" job, call me if you buy a Dillon.

Better hurry. This fellow will be 70 day after tomorrow.

Red (who has reloaded for almost 50 years) Cent.

GaryL
September 29, 2011, 08:14 PM
Does it matter if a $10 kia can outrun a 512T if the speed limit is still 70mph..


The guy who gets to 70 first gets to be in front. :neener:

Not to mention the chick appeal. :what:

Seriously though, I have a Lee CC and a Dillon 550b. The Lee was a bang for the buck purchase because I wanted a solid single stage. I was kind of surprised to discover that sizing 30-06 on the 550 is easier and smoother than the CC with a better 'feel'. Of course your mileage may vary.

I have no regrets with either purchase, and have been poor enough to appreciate value. But you are going to have a hard time convincing anyone that the additional cost provides no additional value. And in many situations, that additional value is priceless.

Mike1234567
September 29, 2011, 08:23 PM
RE Fast cars: I've got a 1974 Datsun 260Z (early version) same as the 240Z. It has a fiberglass body kit with the rear hatch replaced, the window regulators removed etc. so it only weighs about 2000 pounds. I'll soon be fitting a 431CID small block Chevy (400 block + 427 stroker crankshaft + .020 overbore). So... when it comes to power:weight... my little POS beats all the current million dollar cars.

So what?.....

This is about re-loading gear.

EddieNFL
September 29, 2011, 08:37 PM
RE Fast cars: I've got a 1974 Datsun 260Z (early version) same as the 240Z. It has a fiberglass body kit with the rear hatch replaced, the window regulators removed etc. so it only weighs about 2000 pounds. I'll soon be fitting a 431CID small block Chevy (400 block + 427 stroker crankshaft + .020 overbore). So... when it comes to power:weight... my little POS beats all the current million dollar cars.

So what?.....

This is about re-loading gear.
Ah, the Fairlady! Ever seen a スカイライン (Nissan Skyline)?

Mike1234567
September 29, 2011, 08:56 PM
Ah, the Fairlady! Ever seen a スカイライン (Nissan Skyline)?
Nope... and... yep!!! :D

BUT... this thread is about Dillon presses...

Rembrandt
September 29, 2011, 09:12 PM
Only reloading manufacturer I know that has it's own road.....

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v405/Rembrandt51/Firearms/IMG_0134.jpg

Glock XIX
September 29, 2011, 09:58 PM
When was the last time it snowed in Scottsdale , AZ ? :neener:

You are correct, they have their own street.

Dillon Precision Products, Inc.
8009 East Dillon's Way
Scottsdale, AZ 85260 U.S.A.

GW Staar
September 30, 2011, 01:11 AM
Yes but they reintroduced another version of the same bill. It's only a matter of time.

Bob

That's why I live in New Mexico instead of California. It's also nice to have every state surrounding you gun (and Conceal Carry) friendly...My guns and my hobbies feel safer here.:)

The big worry here is Obama and his friends. Here even Democrats are 90 percent gun friendly.

GW Staar
September 30, 2011, 01:43 AM
With case and bullet feeders I load 500 in less than 20 minutes. Just as fast as the 1050, if you don't have crimped primer pockets.

http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o213/jmorrismetal/reloading/bullet%20feeder/feeder1.jpg

Kudos to your equipment and skill! I mean it! The trouble I see with loading that fast, is the guy pulling the handle is not a computer and can't guarantee, at that speed, that there are no powder bridges, or other problems with measuring powder, or no sideways primers, or other glitches, until there's a lot of work to do to undo it (if its caught at all).

We can prevent part of that with a powder cop, or lockout die, but of course, when they indicate a problem, the speed drops to zero doesn't it? I don't understand why we're racing in the first place. I don't think that's too compatible with safe, quality ammo with Lees, Dillons, or anything else for that matter...least not on this uncomputerized level of personal manufacturing. That's an open invitation to Murphy and his mischief at my house.

On the other hand, you're a lot younger than I am (and smarter too), so I can allow that you can most likely load safe ammo way faster than I can, even if we had the same equipment.:) At the same time, the insinuation is that 500 in 20 minutes ought to be the goal for all progressive reloading is IMO, asking for disaster in many man caves.:D:D

Kevin Rohrer
September 30, 2011, 09:06 AM
re: Locator Tabs

Dillon used to sell those cute little blue locator tabs that attached to the locator pins, making them easier to install and remove. At some point they stopped making them. Does anyone have an after-market source for the tabs?

jmorris
September 30, 2011, 09:55 AM
Kudos to your equipment and skill! I mean it! The trouble I see with loading that fast, is the guy pulling the handle is not a computer and can't guarantee, at that speed, that there are no powder bridges, or other problems with measuring powder, or no sideways primers, or other glitches, until there's a lot of work to do to undo it (if its caught at all).


We can prevent part of that with a powder cop, or lockout die, but of course, when they indicate a problem, the speed drops to zero doesn't it? I don't understand why we're racing in the first place. I don't think that's too compatible with safe, quality ammo with Lees, Dillons, or anything else for that matter...least not on this uncomputerized level of personal manufacturing. That's an open invitation to Murphy and his mischief at my house.


If you don't want to have powder bridges never use extruded powders on a progressive, on the 650 above you still seat primers at the end of the down stroke so you feel every one seat, solving "other glitches" is the point in buying Dillon in the first place.

There is a powder check die on the 650 above and if it ever goes off I do halt operation but again that's the point of the device. The only time it goes off on me these days is before I start loading and swing it up to buzz it so I know the batt is still good.

For some reloading is relaxing and for them a single stage isn't a bad idea as they can "meditate" all day long. On the ammunition I need for matches and practice every week I simply don't have the time these days to load the way I used to. So its only a race with the clock.


Kevin the tabs are standard on a 1050 to this day. So you can pick them up from Dillon.

Hangingrock
September 30, 2011, 11:54 AM
2.4 per Sec:what:I'm not that fast.:o

jmorris
September 30, 2011, 05:22 PM
2.4 per SecI'm not that fast.


Your math is backwords 2.4 rounds per second is 8640 an hour. 500 in 20 min is 1 round averaging 2.4 seconds. "One thousand one" down stroke, "one thousand two" up stroke is all it takes.

nonamehavei
September 30, 2011, 05:28 PM
Wow, thats still pretty darn fast, I think I have Dillon envy!

GW Staar
September 30, 2011, 05:30 PM
If you don't want to have powder bridges never use extruded powders on a progressive, on the 650 above you still seat primers at the end of the down stroke so you feel every one seat, solving "other glitches" is the point in buying Dillon in the first place.

I buy the "no extruded powders argument" if you think you have to load that fast. But not the "feel" every primer seat at that speed.

As for other "glitches" the one thing Dillon is NOT known for is any lack of threads on Brian Enos, or any other reloading forum, on Dillon 650 glitches, sideways primers, and even primer tube kabooms. Yes it's a great press, but there is no such thing as a glitch-free press out of the box.

For some reloading is relaxing and for them a single stage isn't a bad idea as they can "meditate" all day long. On the ammunition I need for matches and practice every week I simply don't have the time these days to load the way I used to. So its only a race with the clock.

Valid argument, as long as ammo you're able to make at that speed is competition quality. I have no doubt yours is, and that your presses are tweaked to near perfection. Obviously you have the talent to so tweak. Whether jmorris wannabes can do that is another thing.:D One of the reasons I picked the Pro 2000 over it. Less complicated with fewer moving parts....less to have to tweak. Nor do I have the pressure of competition every week.

jcwit
September 30, 2011, 05:59 PM
I'm retired, did so at 57, I waited all my working life to retire. My life is now absorbed with hobbies. When my hobbies become work I will no longer pursue that hobby. Price of said hobby has nothing to do with it.

Personnally I think spending the amount that a Dillion press costs is outrageous, but then I have rifles that could have bought 2, 3, 4 Dillion presses.

Final comment, To each his own!

joed
October 1, 2011, 10:18 AM
If you don't want to have powder bridges never use extruded powders on a progressive, on the 650 above you still seat primers at the end of the down stroke so you feel every one seat, solving "other glitches" is the point in buying Dillon in the first place.
Yep! I've been telling people for years Unique has problems but no one agrees. I finally quit using it in my Dillons even with the powder check die.

The quirk of the progressives is not all powders will work well. But the ones that do are amazing.

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