Case lube for Lee classic pistol loader kit?


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A strange person
September 20, 2011, 04:01 PM
I picked up a Lee loader kit in .44MAG recently. I figured it would be a good truck reloading kit (as to why I would need such a thing, know that I have a "truck" version of just about everything I own.)

Lee's site states that the .44MAG version may require "considerable force" to size the cases. The instruction that came with it also state that the lee loader kit neck-sizes only, though I assumed that this referred only to bottle-necked cartridges. It said nothing about using case lube. I used a Lee loader kit for a .308 for a while, never used lube, and never had any problems.

To make it short, I went ahead and used case lube on my .44MAG cases anyway, because I thought that a straight-walled case would be harder to size in general (in addition to the warning from Lee about the .44MAG in particular). Sizing, even with case lube, did indeed require "considerable force", and one of the cases I sized looked slightly misshapen after, though it may have been my imagination. However, I noticed that the cases go into the die quite a ways before being "caught".

Maybe the Lee pistol kits really are neck-sizers only after all? Maybe I should just skip the lube? I ask because the only lube I have on hand is Frankford Arsenal's, and the toxicity warning labels on the thing have pretty much scared me away from using it since I got it in the mail. I also decided that spray lubes suck after using it just once. Does anyone here have experience with Lee's pistol kits?

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A strange person
September 20, 2011, 09:12 PM
Maybe that was all too complicated, i'll rephrase it.

Does one need to use case lube with the Lee classic loader pistol kits?

jcwit
September 20, 2011, 09:31 PM
They do not say its required as in being needed. But it sure would make life easier don't you think? I even use a spray teflon when resizing pistol cases when using my press, just to make life easier.

Why work harder than necessary.

GCBurner
September 20, 2011, 11:02 PM
The Lee Classic Loader isn't a carbide die, so a little case lube makes it easier to resize, even on straight pistol cases. I used the regular Lee case lube in the squeeze tube, just a dab rubbed around the case mouth with my fingers. It's non-toxic, and cleans up with water.

highlander 5
September 21, 2011, 07:00 PM
My first reloading set up was the Lee Loader and if my memory serves me correctly thei "idea" of lube was a 50/50 mix of canning wax and vasealine. This was 40+ years ago mind you. If your smart buy a hand priming tool from RCBS or Lee,you don't want to be hammering on primers to seat them. Ask me how I know.

jcwit
September 21, 2011, 07:23 PM
you don't want to be hammering on primers to seat them. Ask me how I know.

Why? All it'll do is possibly go bang and waste a primer. It's not a bomb.

Tip, don't "hammer" them in "tap" them in with a dead blow or rubber mallet.

osprey176
September 22, 2011, 01:28 AM
Lee makes a handheld press that uses standard dies.I am looking to pick one up for my truck.Using one,you could go with carbide dies and scrap the whole lube mess.At least on pistol rounds.With a lee hand primer,and a set of powder scoops, you'd be good to go,and it all fits in a Tupperware container.Thats the plan for my truck anyway.

JohnM
September 22, 2011, 07:30 AM
What are you doing resizing the case in a Lee Loader after it's primed?
With that loader you deprime, then resize, then prime.
In, at least the newer, instruction sheet it mentions that with larger cases some case lube may help. Should be pretty east to understand that.

I still have some Lee Loaders I bought when they were $9.95.
I'm even thinking of buying another for a cartridge I rarely use and probably would never have more than a box or 2 around. Just can't see getting a set of regular dies for it.

jcwit
September 22, 2011, 11:17 AM
Where does the OP say he's sizing cases after seating primers?

I ask because the only lube I have on hand is Frankford Arsenal's, and the toxicity warning labels on the thing have pretty much scared me away from using it since I got it in the mail.

I seriously doubt that needs to be much of a concern to you or anyone else. More than likely its for legal reasons. Just MHO

JohnM
September 22, 2011, 11:40 AM
jcwit sorry you're bent out of shape.
As I read some of the posts it sounded like someone pounding a primed case into the sizer.
Legal what?

jcwit
September 22, 2011, 11:51 AM
Sorry you think I'm bent out of shape, I'm not.

Please note your PM.

Best
jcwit


Legal what?

Lawsuit reasons.

A strange person
September 24, 2011, 09:32 PM
Forget it. I just got Lee's breech lock hand press, and it has changed my life.

scrat
September 25, 2011, 12:21 PM
ANSWER:


You can use case lube it does make it a little easier. However its a catch 22. If you use case lube then you might as well do your reloading in batches. meaning take all the rounds deprime and size them all at once. then you will need to clean the die and make sure it is fully cleaned and dried before continuing.

WHY:

If you follow the instructions after depriming and sizing you press in a primer then tap out the round from die then using the die as a funnel pour in the powder then seat the bullet.

You cant do this if you have lubed up the die as when you go pour in the powder it will stick to the lube on the walls resulting in less powder or even powder contamination. then if you do wash it and continue when its still wet.


well you get the picture. now i have done 44 mag its possible and same time for me no problem. but to each his own.

rsrocket1
September 25, 2011, 12:51 PM
A good case lube for you truck loading scenario is the water based Lee Lube that comes in a toothpaste tube. You don't need to clean it off and it won't hurt the powder or primer. Just coat the case with a thin uniform film all the way down the case and your resizing will be a lot smoother. If you need to wipe very much off, you put too much on. With .44's you don't need lube especially if you get a carbide die, but it will make resizing easier with that hand press.

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