Does using heavier bullets in a 357 magnum make the blast more beareable


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MUSICALGUNNUT45
September 21, 2011, 04:52 PM
I could never stand the amount of muzzel blast you get with a 357 magnum. and I read somewhere that part of this is attributed to the fact that most factory loadings use bullets that are only 130 grains and under in weight. And I started thinking that if you use bullets that are 158 grains and up in weight it should make the blast less sharp does anyone have any experience with this concept.

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rcmodel
September 21, 2011, 05:45 PM
I don't think you will notice much difference.
It is the high pressure that produces the loud sharp crack.

And all .357 bullet weights are loaded to about the same 35,000 PSI pressure.

Low pressure calibers like .38 Spl, .44 Spl & .45 Colt are noticeably easier on unprotected ears then the high pressure Magnum calibers.

Anyway, if you can't stand the blast, you need to seriously upgrade your hearing protection.
Buy better ear muffs.
Or you can double up on ear plugs & ear muffs if you need too.

rc

PO2Hammer
September 21, 2011, 06:33 PM
In factory loads it seems to be true. Muzzle blast is one reason I'm moving from .357 to .44 spl (tinnitus).
Full power 158s seemed to be easier for me to deal with than full power 125s when comparing jacketed factory loads.
In handloading, heavier bullets get less powder and stay in the bore longer, so it should follow that the heavys have less blast assuming the same powder and peak pressure.
The difference isn't huge, barely noticeable.

.44 special is much easier on my old shell shocked ears.

357 Terms
September 21, 2011, 07:30 PM
I can get bright flash with just about any bullet weight, just depends on the powder I use.

Some of the biggest flash I have ever seen(factory loads) was from some Blazer Brass many years ago in the 158grn sp loads

Brasso
September 21, 2011, 08:20 PM
9mm and .40 are loaded to about the same pressure as .357. A heavier bullet with less powder and lower velocities will reduce the blast.

Rexster
September 22, 2011, 08:27 AM
The 145-gain Winchester Silvertip has notably mild flash and blast, compared to many other .357 Mag loads. Unfortunately, Winchester is very proud of their .357 Silvertips, which makes many dealers reluctant to stock them.

Drail
September 22, 2011, 08:59 AM
If the powder is still burning AFTER the bullet has left the barrel then you'll have blast. 125 gr. flame thrower loads are a waste of powder and are abusive to the gun. Shoot your favorite load in low light and see how much powder you're wasting.

CraigC
September 22, 2011, 09:09 AM
It's not "wasted". Slower burning powders like 296/H110 or Lil Gun will always yield the highest velocities. They will also produce the most muzzle blast.

roaddog28
September 22, 2011, 09:38 AM
It's not "wasted". Slower burning powders like 296/H110 or Lil Gun will always yield the highest velocities. They will also produce the most muzzle blast.

And those type of powders combined with a lighter grain bullet will result in more flame cutting and erosion of the forcing cone. They are hard on any brand of revolver.

Regards,
Howard

CraigC
September 22, 2011, 11:05 AM
Very true as well. Actually Lil Gun seems to be worse than the other two.

Walkalong
September 22, 2011, 11:23 AM
125's seem to have more muzzle blast than 158's. You need to try some for yourself to see how they feel to you. In general, the 158's are burning less powder, which helps.

If you are buying factory loads some are tamer than others and will have less blast, especially in the 158's.

If you reload you can tailor it to suit in any bullet weight.

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