Beginner's Revolver that's NOT a .22?


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LJ-MosinFreak-Buck
September 25, 2011, 06:02 PM
Can anyone suggest a revolver for a beginner to purchase? I've been interested in revolvers for some time. Please include a small description and a picture if possible.

Thanks guys,
LJ

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CraigC
September 25, 2011, 06:10 PM
I would not suggest a revolver for ANY beginner that is NOT a .22LR. Ever.

Ash_J_Williams
September 25, 2011, 06:11 PM
You can shoot 500 rounds for less than 20 bucks with a .22. As a beginner, unless you expect to become a novice extremely quickly and not need to buy another gun, why not go with the bargain shooter?

themaninblack
September 25, 2011, 06:13 PM
If you're set on not getting a .22 I would suggest a .38 special with at least a 4" barrel.

rcmodel
September 25, 2011, 06:14 PM
IMO: A beginners revolver that isn't a .22 is not a beginners revolver.

It takes a lot off ammo to get truly proficient with a handgun.
And few people can afford to feed a centerfire unless they also reload.

If I just had to suggest something?
It would have to be a .357 Mag of some sort.
You can Google S&W & Ruger yourself for models & pictures.

Then you start out shooting .38 Spl in it till you learn how to shoot.
Don't make the mistake of starting with full power .357 ammo as you will develop a flinch that will take forever to get over.

rc

Racinbob
September 25, 2011, 06:16 PM
??????????? CraigC????????? Why? A used K frame S&W would be a great "beginners" revolver. I would suggest a .38 spl. or a .357 and use the spl. in it at first. You can't go wrong with a .22 but I can't think of a single reason (OK, maybe ammo cost) to limit it to a .22.

LJ-MosinFreak-Buck
September 25, 2011, 06:22 PM
I simply don't want a .22 lr. But I guess I can look at that as an option, but I'm not new to pistols. I have experience shooting autos, and only own one pistol, which is an Astra.

Walkalong
September 25, 2011, 06:24 PM
.32 Long (Or Mag). Cheap to reload, low recoil, accurate, lots of fun. I shot some .32 Mag today from two different revolvers. Light 83 Gr HBWC loads, and a few full power 100 Gr loads.

Walkalong
September 25, 2011, 06:26 PM
If you want to go auto, a CZ 83 (http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=143422&d=1307197469) or a Beretta 81 (http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=142157&d=1305391784) in .32 auto. Same reasons as .32 Long/Mag.

Both were recently available cheap as police trade ins. I picked up one of each. There are probably more out there still.

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=592870

Ash_J_Williams
September 25, 2011, 06:28 PM
??????????? CraigC????????? Why? A used K frame S&W would be a great "beginners" revolver. I would suggest a .38 spl. or a .357 and use the spl. in it at first. You can't go wrong with a .22 but I can't think of a single reason (OK, maybe ammo cost) to limit it to a .22.

Ammo cost and revolver cost.

It's silly to jump into expensive round knowing full well that you need to practice, a lot.

Ratshooter
September 25, 2011, 06:29 PM
My first handgun was a Rhom/RG type single action 22 and it was a piece of junk. My uncle, a Ft Worth police officer said "lets get you a model 19". So he helped me get a 6" model 19 with all the works for a little over $200 from a police supply house.

I shot one box of wadcutters and one box of 357s and immediatly started handloading. Unlike others here I think a 38/357 makes a fine starter gun but you need to reload.

A model 15 38 special is a really good starter gun. So are the Taurus 66 series but get someone who knows guns to check it out for you. Any 4-6" model 19/66 is a good gun along with the Ruger security sixes and the GP100. Training with a seasoned shooter is a good way to become a decent shot without running yourself in debt in ammo cast. My buddy just bought his first centerfire gun, a smith&wesson model 10 with a 6" barrel has loaded a couple of boxes of ammo on my press. I told him to buy his componants and he can use my tools all he wants. I have 3/4s ton of lead and told him he can cast all the bullets he wants just bring his own gas bottle for the melter. A box of 50 rounds can be loaded very cheap this way.

And plan on buying a 22 for all the reasons listed above.

sidheshooter
September 25, 2011, 06:36 PM
Police/security trade S&W model 64.

Spend the difference between that and a new gun on a killer daylong shooting class that allows you to use the revolver.

Starting on a .22, while proven and cheap, is old school compared to today's new shooter reality. If a new shooter has a family member or friend with a .22 to teach them the way my dad did me with the ol' flatgate single six, then they don't need any help from THR.

But the majority of new shooters I see are wanting their first defensive gun, and there are scores of good instructors (and a few bad ones) springing up in practically every city that are proving, even today (I just got back from the range, and there was a class in session in the tac bay), that one can start from scratch with an XD, G19 or service revolver.

JMO.

sidheshooter
September 25, 2011, 06:41 PM
Oh yes, link and pics here:

http://www.jgsales.com/index.php/smith-wesson/revolver/cPath/16_211_431

sm
September 25, 2011, 06:45 PM
Another vote for Model 10/Model 64

wlewisiii
September 25, 2011, 06:51 PM
Smith & Wesson Model 15.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/cf/S%26WModel15-4_01.jpg

You can sit and shoot wad cutters through it all day long. Learn to reload and it's almost as cheap as a .22.

If you need to, put Buffalo Bore 158 gr LSWCHP +P in it for home/self defense.

DWFan
September 25, 2011, 06:55 PM
A beginner's revolver that isn't a .22?
I'd recommend a good quality 4" barrel .357 Magnum shooting cast bullet "cowboy load" .38 Specials. Just keep the chambers and bore clean for when you do move up to jacketted .357 Magnum ammo and don't be in a hurry to get there.

duns
September 25, 2011, 06:56 PM
All of you who are saying a .22 is the only revolver for a beginner are forgetting the popular image of the .22 as a mere toy. I started off with .38 special and .357 magnum and moved to .22 later when I appreciated the usefulness as a skill-building tool at very low cost. I would suggest letting the beginner shoot every caliber that is to hand and then suggesting that for skills development, doing a lot of shooting from a .22 is at least one of the avenues to take.

LJ-MosinFreak-Buck
September 25, 2011, 06:57 PM
I will look into these. Thanks for the suggestions.

scramasax
September 25, 2011, 07:22 PM
If you just cann't wrap your mind around a .22 revolver. Just keep on searching for a Ruger/S&W/Colt revolver in 38/357 with a 3-4" barrel. There are plenty of them out there in good shape. You need to do search on how to check it for flaws and damage.

My first pistol was a Colt New Fronteer in .22. My second pistol was Colt reissue 1851 Navy C&B. It is the best balanced handgun I've ever shot. The third handgun I was given was a S&W model 10 carried by my Grandfather in the Pacific. I can still shoot these as good as any of my other pistols custom tuned or not.

By all means get a centerfire pistol and an inexpencive reloading set up, You'll enjoy yourself.

Cheers,

ts

mmitch
September 25, 2011, 07:28 PM
LJ,

I'll second the S&W model 15:

http://i730.photobucket.com/albums/ww310/satcong_01/15_3_9556.jpg

Mike

joed
September 25, 2011, 07:39 PM
Why would anyone need to start with a .22 rf?? My next choice would be the .38 Spl, there are more then you could possibly want, ammo is available just about anywhere and it is a great cartridge for a beginner.

Waywatcher
September 25, 2011, 07:45 PM
I like rcmodels response in post #5.

I started "from scratch" (no parents, mentors, etc.) and I started with a .22LR. Boringest gun I ever had. Would not do that again.

A 4" STEEL revolver in .357, but shooting .38s is the best answer. You won't get bored.

Walkalong
September 25, 2011, 08:21 PM
I do not think .22 LR is boring (I own 6, 3 pistols and 3 rifles), but it certainly isn't enough to keep one going all the time. One needs larger calibers to go with it. That said, people shoot .22 LR by the truckload. Must be something they like about it.

A good used .38 Spl or .357 Mag can be had fairly inexpensively if you keep an eye out and are patient. they can be loaded so light you will think you are shooting a .22, or loaded up hotter for more fun.

I picked up a Model 10-6 heavy barrel (http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=113394&d=1263597316) for under $300, and it is a favorite of mine.

They can be pretty cheap to reload, but naturally cannot compare to .22 for low cost.

Loosedhorse
September 25, 2011, 08:23 PM
Smith used to have a j-frame steel .357 with a 5-inch barrel (http://www.gunblast.com/SW60_KitGun.htm). With target .38 rounds, that gun is a dream.

gofastman
September 25, 2011, 08:29 PM
Taurus 66 (http://www.taurususa.com/product-details.cfm?id=279&category=Revolver&toggle=tr&breadcrumbseries=MF2) with a 6" barrel

Caliper_RWVA
September 25, 2011, 08:30 PM
LJ, sounds like you aren't so much a beginner as much as just a first time revolver purchaser. A .357 mag from any reputable brand should serve you well. Shoot anything from .38 wadcutters to hot magnum loads, as much as your wrists can handle!

I don't get all the people here down on the .22 though. Seems like if you don't shoot .22 you've gotta be either pretty well off or just don't shoot much. Several times a month we have steel plate handgun shoots at my club. All of us are big into guns and most everybody reloads, but by the end of the match we are cleaning up the 22 cases with a snow shovel. Sure, 22LR doesn't have the big boom, large holes and defensive capability of the larger centerfire rounds, but it is affordable to go and shoot hundreds of rounds and lets you practice all the basics that translate directly to centerfire.

Another good reason to have at least one .22 pistol and .22 rifle is for new shooters. Plenty of people who have never been around guns find shooting even a .32 ACP or .223 to be more gun than they expected. With 22LR you are 99% sure to not scare anyone off and help bring more people over to our side ;)

mdauben
September 25, 2011, 08:32 PM
I would not suggest a revolver for ANY beginner that is NOT a .22LR. Ever.
My first pistol was a 9mm and my first revolver was a .357. I was shooting handguns for several years before I bought my first .22 handgun and I don't see any problem with doing things that way. Admittedly rimfire ammo is cheaper but IMO that is it's only real "beginner" advantage and if the OP wants to forgo that benefit there is no real reason not to.

22-rimfire
September 25, 2011, 08:35 PM
Since you do have "experience", I would suggest a 357 mag revolver such as a 4" Ruger GP-100 in which you can shoot either 38spl or 357 mag. The S&W Model 15's are great too. Essentially I suggest any Colt, Ruger or S&W revolver with a steel frame in 38spl or 357 mag.

toivo
September 25, 2011, 08:36 PM
OP is a beginner to revolvers but not a beginner to shooting or to handguns. For him, I think a used Colt or S&W in .38 Special would be just fine. But for a first firearm or first handgun, I agree with the .22 rimfire option. Look at it this way: A new shooter needs to shoot a lot. A box of 50 rounds of .38 Special will run you $15 to $20. That same $15/$20 will get you 500 rounds of .22 rimfire. That's a lot of practice.

There are obviously differences between practicing with .22 rimfire and with larger centerfire calibers, but the basics -- sight picture, breath control, trigger control, etc. -- are the same.

LJ-MosinFreak-Buck
September 25, 2011, 09:01 PM
Thanks guys, I've been shooting continuously the last 7 years, but I've been around guns since I was 7 so if you put it together, I've been around guns for 14 out of my 21 years. In that time, I have shot a few pistols, but up until March of this year, I never owned one.

I bought my 9mm Astra A-90 and have already put 500 rounds through it before I've had this grip/gunsmith/gripmaker probem. And I've been wanting a revolver lately, so I figured I'd ask about them and get some ideas on which is a good one.

sm
September 25, 2011, 09:15 PM
This is the original poster's thread title.
Anyone that knows me, knows how much I feel the .22 revolver is the best handgun gun to learn on, and to to continue quality practice with.

But he asked for a non .22.

For those that look down on the .22 rim fire, I recall wisdom of Mentors shared with me:

As one ages and matures, the appreciation of the .22 rim-fire goes up exponentially.

Mentors are gone, I have become them, and their wisdom still rings true today.

LJ-MosinFreak-Buck
September 25, 2011, 09:28 PM
I don't have a problem with the .22. I want one I can practice with, and carry once I get my CCW permit. I have a Marlin Model 80 in .22 that I absolutely love, just don't another firearm in that caliber. I used to go through 500 rounds of .22 in a week. I don't wanna triple that lol

Iggy
September 25, 2011, 09:34 PM
I started out with a .22 about 45 years ago. Went to a .38 and on to a .41 magnum for a duty weapon for many years. I'm back to .38s and .22s.. I'll bet I fire 50 .22 to one magnum round these days.

Since the OP is already a shooter, maybe a medium framed S&W,Colt, or Ruger in .357 and enjoy the .38s you can squirt through it.

LJ-MosinFreak-Buck
September 25, 2011, 10:34 PM
I'm interested in the Ruger GP100 in 357; or what about 327 Fed Mag? Or just save up for both? How much do each of them cost?

Ash_J_Williams
September 25, 2011, 10:59 PM
My first pistol was a 9mm and my first revolver was a .357. I was shooting handguns for several years before I bought my first .22 handgun and I don't see any problem with doing things that way. Admittedly rimfire ammo is cheaper but IMO that is it's only real "beginner" advantage and if the OP wants to forgo that benefit there is no real reason not to.

It is? Not manageable recoil, or ease to find (I've been unable to find .38, .357, or 9mm at Walmart for months, but .22 by the thousands), or cost of the firearm itself?

I'd hate to spend the cash to shoot several hundred or thousand rounds of .38 or 9mm.

FreddyKruger
September 25, 2011, 11:16 PM
i vote you go for whatever you want in 357Mag. And while you are new to it, just use lighter 38Special loads. It will get you used to a revolver and centrefire and then when you want to, just get some bigger stuff going. saves you buying 2 guns and is beginner friendly. only thing that is the problem is the cost of ammo compared to 22lr, but if you reload or know someone who does it shouldnt be too much of an attack on the wallet.

LJ-MosinFreak-Buck
September 25, 2011, 11:17 PM
If i go the way of 327 I'b be able to use more than two different calibers

CraigC
September 25, 2011, 11:45 PM
My first pistol was a 9mm and my first revolver was a .357. I was shooting handguns for several years before I bought my first .22 handgun and I don't see any problem with doing things that way. Admittedly rimfire ammo is cheaper but IMO that is it's only real "beginner" advantage and if the OP wants to forgo that benefit there is no real reason not to.
If you started out with something else, you short changed yourself. There is simply no better tool for building shooting skill and avoiding bad habits than a good .22LR. Period, no way to argue against it. Simply put, shooters who appreciate and properly train with a .22LR (rifle and pistol) are better shooters. No way around it. There is no substitute for trigger time.

Black Knight
September 25, 2011, 11:56 PM
I started out with a Colt Python in 357 Magnum loaded with 38 Spec+P. As others have said it would be difficult to beat a 38 Special or 357 Magnum loaded with 38 Specials. S&W, Ruger, and older Colts would be a good place to start.

Watsonville
September 26, 2011, 12:31 AM
357 4" shoot 38's out of it then buy some 357 158gr's or be smart buy a 22

doc2rn
September 26, 2011, 02:20 AM
I am with the S&W mod 10 crowd especially if its got a 3" barrel.
Autos are nothing like revos, as you will see.

LJ-MosinFreak-Buck
September 26, 2011, 02:30 AM
Definately keeping all these in mind!

evan price
September 26, 2011, 04:14 AM
If you look around you can find one of the police trade-in S&W Model 10's for $200-ish.

I picked up a 10-6 4" heavy barrel for about $150 recently. It's no beauty queen but she shoots well.

38 special...can load it mild or wild or anything in between and it shoots great. I shoot my reloaded 38 spls for the price of 22 rimfire. 2000 shells per pound of powder.

I would advise anyone thinking about it that if they find any inexpensive police trade revolvers, they don't hesitate, most LE and security agencies have switched to semi-autos. Some prisons and such are clearing out their armories but that's going to be it. I still remember my local gun store about ten-fifteen years ago with shelves full of .357 Magnum Colt Troopers and S&W 19's and such and they were under $300. Nowadays, good luck.

redraidermgr
September 26, 2011, 04:56 AM
Like a lot of people ahead of me have suggested definitely check out a new or used .357. I have an old S&W Model 19 that I love dearly. Check your local gun shops or pawn shops for a good deal for one with decent bluing that is in good repair. Also I would second getting something with a 4" barrel. Taurus makes some good quality cheap guns (you get what you pay for but I have shot a couple of their longer barreled revolvers and they were very accurate and fun to shoot) but they are not made in America. If you want to buy American go with a used S&W (S&W new is very expensive but are usually very well made) or a Ruger (great and durable guns but not the same fit and make as some of the very old school smiths).

madcratebuilder
September 26, 2011, 06:37 AM
Do you want a DA or SA? Ruger, Colt, S&W, Dan Wesson all have good choices. A .357 well allow you to shoot .38spl also. If you prefer to start higher on the food chain a M27 or M29 S&W would be a good choice. The magnum calibers cost more to shoot, a good reason the learn to reload.

oldfool
September 26, 2011, 07:08 AM
OP title was at least partially misleading, since corrected twice
He is not a beginner, just looking for a 1st centerfire revolver
so.. although I, like many others, am a strong advocate of 22 rimfire revolvers #1, it's not what he wants

As others have said, any all steel 4" to 6" barrel 38/357 will do, preferably a DA/SA (with hammer spur). I would go "full size" frame 1st to decide if revolvers are for you before dropping to smaller frame sizes.

4" to 6" barrel (vs shorter) for the sight radius and because you can actually put mag load powder charge to useful work if/when you go mag. SA/DA because it will let you learn "both ways", before deciding if DAO is for you. 357 aka 38/357 because it is THE most versatile for ammo selection, even more versatile than the 32/327 flavors, and will give you the option to step up to full 357 mag.

All time #1 best choice being any S&W k-frame, although that pretty much means used old model S&Ws.

Other excellent choices include -
Ruger GP100
S&W 686
any of the old model Ruger "Six" models (as in speed six, security six)
any of the old Colts, of course, Cobra, Python et al.
any of the old Dan Wessons

But unless you know wheelguns well, which I presume a newbie to wheelguns might not, the "good old ones" may be tough to pick out, and some (Colts in particular), pretty pricey. The used S&Ws (model 10s, and sixty-somethings) are pretty doggone common though, and not real pricey.

Taurus does make some good revolvers... and some not-good... hence I myself will not recommend to a new shooter, not unless they ask about a specific model/caliber/vintage.

Good luck OP, and welcome to the world of wheelguns !

PS
but if you change your mind about rimfire, start hunting good deals on k-22, k-17, k-18 S&Ws and/or old Colts..
(your very 1st revolver in rimfire likewise really ought be a DA/SA until you get a better feel for SA and DA, and a full size frame model will give you a better experience for then moving on to shooting full frame size centerfires)

stevekozak
September 26, 2011, 07:51 AM
Any K-Frame Smith in .38-.357 with barrel 4+ inches would do you fine. The smooth triggers on these older Smiths and shooting .38 ammo will help ease you into the the revolver genre.

LJ-MosinFreak-Buck
September 26, 2011, 08:15 AM
I prefer the DA over the SA, only wouldn't mind if it were both. I don't like the look of the hammerless, it makes me sick. I'm a lot about aesthetics so, lol.

I guess I'll look for one in .357 and find a cheap reloading set up and practive with light loads of .38 until I'm ready for a mightier load. The revolver I choose would have to be on my person about 99% of the time, I plan on using it for CCW.

oldfool
September 26, 2011, 08:27 AM
double tap

Quoheleth
September 26, 2011, 08:28 AM
I paid over $600 for my Smith model 17 in .22. Box of ammo - 550 rounds for $15.

I paid $190 for my last K-frame (model 10) this summer. Not real pretty, but it's solid and accurate. My reloads cost me about $5/100; factory stuff - when I spring for it - is about $25/50.

While ammo costs more for the .38, I have a lot less invested in the gun. It costs me more to shoot the .38, but my initial investment was less. The .22 costs less to shoot but a significantly higher initial investment.

Q

oldfool
September 26, 2011, 08:28 AM
"I plan on using it for CCW."

I did not see you prior post that
that suggests a smaller frame gun
snubbies are tougher to learn on with than full size, even moreso in DA mode, not a prime choice for "my 1st revolver", but if that's where you are going, at least consider 3" models
S&W model 60 Pro or Ruger SP101 readily come to mind
some folk do CCW k-frame size, even up to 4", but they are a lot tougher to conceal

you might ought think some about trying out some revolvers at a rental range
if it must be a snubbie, then look at Taurus 85, better trigger than most

LJ-MosinFreak-Buck
September 26, 2011, 08:48 AM
Oh, no I would like to CCW a medium frame. I'm a pretty big guy, 5' 11" and 240 lbs. I wear a light zip-up jacket about 80% of the year so concealing wouldn't be a big deal (shoulder holster.)

robctwo
September 26, 2011, 09:36 AM
Get the S&W 15 or the 10. I have three 15s and one 10. Very nice shooters. I reload everything from light target to +p.

http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e186/robctwo/15-4c.jpg
15-4 Nickel

http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e186/robctwo/photo6.jpg
15-2

http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e186/robctwo/DSCN0623.jpg
10-6

LJ-MosinFreak-Buck
September 26, 2011, 09:42 AM
I'm really liking that 10-6

chicharrones
September 26, 2011, 10:31 AM
I'm interested in the Ruger GP100 in 357; or what about 327 Fed Mag? Or just save up for both? How much do each of them cost?

The GP100 was my first handgun purchase back in the early '90s. The GP100 is heavy enough that felt recoil alone most likely will not cause flinching with standard .357 loads let alone .38 Special. Unless someone is foolhardy enough to shoot without hearing protection. That will make your whole body flinch shooting .357 mag.

I understand everyone suggesting to start with a .22, but a .38 Special is a soft shooter in almost any revolver with enough barrel on it and enough weight. Especially with some target loads. Obviously, a snub nose revolver is not in that category of a beginner's revolver.

If a person doesn't object to paying more for .38 ammo over .22 ammo, go for the bigger bore.

chicharrones
September 26, 2011, 10:41 AM
For those that look down on the .22 rim fire, I recall wisdom of Mentors shared with me:

As one ages and matures, the appreciation of the .22 rim-fire goes up exponentially.

Very true. While I grew up with .22 rifles, I did not start out with .22 handguns.

Then, over the last three years I have picked up three .22 handguns. The last one being a revolver. Maybe we are just getting cheaper as we age? :D

Radagast
September 26, 2011, 10:52 AM
My pick: A S&W Model 15 AND a S&W Model 18. same balance, one for lots of .22 practise and the other for carry in .38 Special +P.
If just one gun and no .22, then a S&W Model 66, look for one of the rare three inch barrel versions. It will be easier to conceal than the four inch gun and unlike the 2.5 inch gun it has a full length extractor for complete ejection of the cases.

BCRider
September 26, 2011, 11:46 AM
As a first revolver in YOUR case and with your familiarity with semis already any of the .357Mag guns is an obvious choice. It gives you more options for loads to shoot.

If you've carried full size semis in shoulder holsters regularly then any barrel length up to and including 4 inches should be fine. A 4 inch K frame is not any bigger overall than a GI 1911.

There's lots of options in that case that come in blued or stainless. And considering it'll live some of the time in your armpit :D you may want to look at the stainless options.

If it were mostly going to be a range gun I'd say to get a gun with adjustable sights so you can tune them for shooting .38's and .357's as you go. But if you're carrying there's much to be said for fixed sights that don't catch on the holster or clothing. But fixed sights really limit the ammo you can shoot and still have it hit anywhere near POA. It would have to be your call on that one. But if you are pretty sure that you could live with using the fairly stout .38Spl +P choices instead of jumping on the .357Mag bandwagon then a fixed sight model 10 in 4 inch would be pretty nice. Just get the +P rounds in heavy bullet options to limit how low it'll tend to shoot. With 158's or even 180's the POI should be really, really close to the POA on a Model 10. Or if you reload then stick to 158's and load up to strong .38Spl or mid power +P loads and play with the final loading recipe until you match POI with POA.

Ideally you'd consider this first revolver as just that, a FIRST revolver. From there you could get an actual 3 or 4 inch to use for CCW that is setup with all the right features for CCW such as smooth fixed sights and a really nice holster for that exact gun.

In any event welcome to old fashioned wheelguns.... Warning, they ARE addictive :D

LJ-MosinFreak-Buck
September 26, 2011, 12:33 PM
I was thinking about getting a .357 GP100 or a S&W. That way I can used either .38spl or .357. Reloading shouldn't be too difficult, and I have a shoulder holster for my Astra, it's relatively the same size as a 4" 1911 so I figure it might work with a medium sized revolver as well.

The holster is an Uncle Mike's horizontal shoulder size 15 if that clears things up. Though, I'd like a fancier leather one for a revolver having speed loader pouches to use for CCW.

I think I'll just stay with blued, but stainless does look nice. Depends on what options are available and what I can afford.

sixgunner455
September 26, 2011, 01:37 PM
I love my .357 S&W. Mine is a 3" model 13, which is a fixed-sight gun. The K Frame S&W was a beautiful invention, and still is a great gun to have around. Get one, have fun!

I think you should get a .22 to boot, but that certainly isn't necessary. Just prudent. :D

I don't know how you could load .38 for the same money as .22, at least not for bulk .22. Maybe if all you shoot is Green Tag or Mini Mag or Stingers, you're spending the same money, but I load .38 for about $5/50. That beats the pants off of factory ammo, but it's nothing like $2/50 like I spend for most of my .22 shooting.

chicharrones
September 26, 2011, 10:03 PM
I was thinking about getting a .357 GP100 . . .

The downside to the GP100 is it is a heavy beast. Most models are 40 oz. or more. If you consider your Astra heavy for carry, I'd look for a lighter revolver than the GP100. Something around 30 oz. would balance well between felt recoil and weight.

LJ-MosinFreak-Buck
September 27, 2011, 03:09 AM
I don't consider my Astra heavy at all. I've wore it in the holster all day just to see what it felt like... no problems at all really.

chicharrones
September 27, 2011, 08:25 AM
Sounds good, then. An Astra A-90 with a full magazine ought to be about as heavy as a GP100 with a full cylinder. 17 rounds of 9mm vs. 6 rounds of .357 mag, that is.

madcratebuilder
September 27, 2011, 09:16 AM
K frame S&W or the slightly larger L frame. Any of the older Ruger DA Six series would be a good choice. A bigger guy with a shoulder holster has more size options, a N frame S&W in .357, .41 or .44mag is very doable.

Cearbhall
September 27, 2011, 10:02 AM
GP-100 with a 4" barrel. And a case of .38 specials.

masterofchaos
September 27, 2011, 08:34 PM
1978...got it a few weeks ago. It shoots 357, but I've only shot 38. This 4" barrel shoots real nice and I enjoy the DA/SA option.

LJ-MosinFreak-Buck
September 27, 2011, 08:45 PM
Looks very nice. I may have to handle one if I find one locally.

evan price
September 28, 2011, 06:37 AM
S&W Model 19 or Model 66 with 2.5" barrel. 357 mag, K-frame, easy to conceal and I have to say it's my favorite 357 K frame.
http://www.sideguardholsters.com/guns/M66-1a.JPG

Not mine, but mine's close- S&W M66 no dash 2.5" pinned & recessed

OldCavSoldier
September 28, 2011, 05:37 PM
Police/security trade S&W model 64.

Spend the difference between that and a new gun on a killer daylong shooting class that allows you to use the revolver.

Starting on a .22, while proven and cheap, is old school compared to today's new shooter reality. If a new shooter has a family member or friend with a .22 to teach them the way my dad did me with the ol' flatgate single six, then they don't need any help from THR.

But the majority of new shooters I see are wanting their first defensive gun, and there are scores of good instructors (and a few bad ones) springing up in practically every city that are proving, even today (I just got back from the range, and there was a class in session in the tac bay), that one can start from scratch with an XD, G19 or service revolver.

JMO.
+1 on that!

LJ-MosinFreak-Buck
September 28, 2011, 07:39 PM
The wheel gun bug has recently hit me and I want one, lol. Oh, Lord, the Heavenly Father! I don't know why you do this to me! You know I can't afford it! :p

230therapy
September 28, 2011, 07:55 PM
Buy one of the Model 64's listed here:
http://www.jgsales.com/index.php/smith-wesson/revolver/cPath/16_211_431

Then go buy some of this to shoot (@800 FPS):
http://georgia-arms.com/cannedheat38special158grplatedsemi-wadcutter1000pk-1.aspx

or shoot this (@750 FPS):
http://georgia-arms.com/38special158grleadroundnoseflatpt50pk.aspx

and clean up with this:
http://www.amazon.com/Chore-Boy%C2%AE-Copper-Scrubbers-Pack/dp/B000RO5JC8

and wrap it around a nylon brush after getting the bore wet with Hoppes #9:
http://www.montanaxtreme.com/products/?id=16&product=Brushes

Don't forget speedloaders:

HKS Model 10-A
http://www.hksspeedloaders.com/SpeedloaderPage.html

5Star Firearms
http://www.5starfirearms.com/357_k.html

Read these books/watch these videos:

Fast and Fancy Revolver Shooting
http://www.amazon.com/McGiverns-Book-Fancy-Revolver-Shooting/dp/160239086X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1317254639&sr=8-1

Snubby Revolver: The ECQ, Backup, and Concealed Carry Standard
http://www.amazon.com/Snubby-Revolver-Concealed-Standard-ebook/dp/B003LPUE5C/ref=sr_1_33?ie=UTF8&qid=1317254704&sr=8-33

"Ultimate Advanced Revolver"
http://www.amazon.com/Ultimate-Advanced-Revolver--DVD-Lenny-Magill/dp/B0002DVA68/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1317254777&sr=8-2

Take some paper plates, marker, and your gear to the range and get cracking!

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