Safety Warning!


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Bowhunter57
September 25, 2011, 09:12 PM
I had a Springfield Armory 1911 Compact Carry V10 and had been carrying it in a DeSantis OWB holster (carried in a 3:30 position), that was made for my M&P 9mm. It seemed to fit "ok", held it in place, but the trigger ring flaps/guards are too large for the SA 1911. I needed to purchase the correct holster for the weapon that I intended to carry!

I have NEVER had a weapons mishandling incident, in my entire life. I've been handling all types of weapons since I was 10 years old.

Anyway... A couple of weeks ago, my brother and were out fishing. As I got out of the car, I was getting our fishing gear ready to go and remembered my CCW was still in the car. (We had traveled a distance to this location and I had put my SA 1911 in the console.) When I retrieved the SA from the console, I checked the safety and it was on, so I pulled up my shirt and attempted to put it in my holster. Well, I wasn't looking at what I was doing and the SA didn't just slide in the holster as had done on previous occassions. So, I wiggled it in a side to side motion in attempt to get the pistol to slip inside the holster.

What I didn't notice was that one of the ear tabs (trigger guards for the M&P) was pushing on the trigger, while the other tab had flipped the ambi-safety off. Ofcourse, my hand was pushing down on the grip safety at the back of the pistol grip and ....you guessed it. BANG!!! Needless to say, I was in a state of shock and afraid to look to see how much of my butt that I'd just blown off. :uhoh: Fortunately, all I got was a huge muzzle blast burn and concussion bruise from the short and ported barrel. Obviously, the shorts I WAS wearing were ripped to shreds, with the back pocket mssing and a bullet nick in my leather wallet. :barf:

I'm not afraid/embarassed to tell this story, as it may help others and save lives to realize that every weapon has to be carried in its' own holster, that was designed for that weapon. I was very lucky and thank God, to this day, that that's all that happened to me. My brother was standing on the other side of the car, the bullet went into the grass and there were no other people standing around in the area. We made a pact to never tell our retired Mom, the events of that day.

I had intended to keep my SA 1911 in the safe, until I purchased the correct holster for it AND get the ambi-safety removed. However, as of this incident I have sold the SA 1911 and replaced it with a Smith & Wesson M&Pc, in 9mm. Since I already own the service model, in the same caliber, I am familar with its' functions.

Bowhunter57

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Cocked & Locked
September 25, 2011, 09:46 PM
Thanks for sharing that info...ouch :eek: Glad you are OK!

Mike1234567
September 25, 2011, 09:47 PM
Wow... glad you're okay. Thank you for sharing. The lesson is "get an appropriately-made holster". After seeing this I'll make darned sure to avoid that problem.

What's the line in that Christmas movie? "You'll shoot your butt off, kid". Yeah, that's it.

bigfatdave
September 25, 2011, 11:23 PM
Well, I'm glad you came out OK, mostly by luck

If you were using the right holster, that wouldn't have happened
If you were wearing a holster that was comfortable in the car, that wouldn't have happened
If you had utilized the grip safety properly, that wouldn't have happened
... I talked about proper use of the grip safety while re-holstering in post #16 and #64 in this thread:
... http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=615691

Switching guns won't fix all your problems, although I wish I'd known there was a Springer 1911 on sale in the area because it was "unsafe".

JohnKSa
September 25, 2011, 11:49 PM
...the SA didn't just slide in the holster as had done on previous occassions.An unusual amount of resistance when reholstering is a warning sign. Immediately stop trying to reholster, make the gun safe, and then determine what is causing the obstruction.

dprice3844444
September 26, 2011, 01:15 AM
coulda shot yourself in the butt and suffered brain damage,thats 1 reason i never carry a 1911

David E
September 26, 2011, 11:33 AM
It's not the fault of the 1911, which has multiple safeties that must be defeated before it'll go off.

The OP, who didn't watch while he reholstered, is only speculating about how it happened. Maybe the safety was already off from previous handling and he didn't see it. Maybe the holster tab engaged the triggerguard. Maybe it was his finger.

I have a hard time understanding how the holster tabs could disengage a properly fitted thumb safety without even a partially attentive person knowing it.

Using proper holstering technique, he would've prevented the incident, even using the wrong holster.

The safeties and features on the 1911 don't exist on the M&P, so it's much easier to replicate the incident with it. Ironic, ain't it.

Mike1234567
September 26, 2011, 12:15 PM
Actually, the M&P, in addition to the drop safety, can be had with or without a thumb safety and/or a mag safety.

Zerodefect
September 26, 2011, 12:20 PM
This is why I love good hard Kydex. I recommend a Ravens Concealment Holster. Easiest to reholster holster I've used that still conceals ok.

Crossbreed for IWB. (But you do have to be more careful IWB)


Or make your own:
http://i584.photobucket.com/albums/ss290/zerodefect2533/DSC01648.jpg
http://i584.photobucket.com/albums/ss290/zerodefect2533/DSC02069.jpg


Holds the safety on and covered so you can't accidentally flick it off:
http://i584.photobucket.com/albums/ss290/zerodefect2533/DSC02068.jpg

David E
September 26, 2011, 01:00 PM
Actually, the M&P, in addition to the drop safety, can be had with or without a thumb safety and/or a mag safety.

Yes, it does. Which version has the grip safety?

Exactly.

Mike1234567
September 26, 2011, 01:54 PM
Yes, it does. Which version has the grip safety?

Exactly.
True but the validity of a grip safety depends on how careful one is when shoving a pistol into a holster. Most folks I observe have the grip firmly in hand when holstering.

David E
September 26, 2011, 02:16 PM
The grip safety gives the shooter an optional, safer holstering method, especially for someone who nearly shot their ass off.

I suspect the M&P the OP purchased lacks the thumb safety, as most M&P Compacts do.

If the difficult holstering of the 1911 wasn't a clue, which the OP speculates was sufficient to knock the safety off, then it will take much less effort to replicate his accident with his new gun.

I just find it amusing that the OP sold the gun because it worked exactly as designed instead of reevaluating his gun handling methods.

JTQ
September 26, 2011, 03:54 PM
DavidE wrote,
I just find it amusing that the OP sold the gun because it worked exactly as designed instead of reevaluating his gun handling methods.
I agree.

It seems as if it would have been easier and cheaper to just buy a holster for a 1911.

A holstering discharge is certainly more likely with an M&P than with a 1911.

AK103K
September 26, 2011, 04:46 PM
It's not the fault of the 1911, which has multiple safeties that must be defeated before it'll go off.
I find it interesting that a few months ago, something similar was posted with a Glock being the gun that went off, and the 1911 boys were all over it telling us how safe the 1911 is, and how something like this couldnt possibly happen, due to all the extra safeties the 1911 has.

Now of course, its not the fault of the 1911. :rolleyes:

In both cases, it was user error, and similar user error with the same result.

Im still amazed people will drop a grand on a handgun, and then spend $10 for an Uncle Mikes holster, or use something else they have laying around.

Sky
September 26, 2011, 04:56 PM
Glad you are OK but bet that hurt; especially the next day!

vvanders
September 26, 2011, 09:44 PM
Yikes, glad you were okay.

I second the Kydex recommendation, I've got a MTAC that's great for my P220 Compact. Leather on the inside for comfort and Kydex perfectly moulded for the gun model.

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6162/6176534261_2884bdf879_b.jpg

Bowhunter57
September 26, 2011, 10:30 PM
I do not dismiss operator error with the 1911. I definately should have paid attention to how I was reholstering...especially after there was the slightest difficulty.

After the incident, I was literally "gun shy" of the weapon. If you've never had a close call of this nature (I hope it doesn't happen to anyone else), it will rattle you to your core. I didn't carry anything for over 2 weeks and then eventually went back to a .38 snubbie.

I am in no way blaming the weapon, the safeties or other functions. It's a matter of familarity, as I've owned the M&P longer, have handled it more and more often. As much as I like my DeSantis leather holster, for my M&P, I like the look, feel and function of the Kydex & Raven holsters...even better. These hard shaped holsters retain their shape and some have release locks, which is even better.

Many thanks to all that have replied and that have shown concern for my well being. :) It is my hope that this posting will help others to not make the same or simular mistake.

Bowhunter57

David E
September 27, 2011, 12:04 AM
When you undertake something as serious as carrying a loaded gun on your person for defense, then you owe it to yourself and everyone around you to be serious about it.

Using a holster that fits "good enough" can bite you in the ass, like it nearly did here.

Steve Malloy, a cop and gunwriter for SWAT was found dead last year. From what they determined, he'd been carrying a Colt 1903 (IIRC) in his waistband without a holster. He'd told his wife a few days before, "I really should get a holster for this."

He bent over to tie his shoe when the gun fell out of the waistband, discharging when it hit the floor, the bullet striking him in the chest. He was found in the garage. He apparently was going to drive himself to the ER

He had other guns that had holsters. The gun does not know you and will kill you or someone else in a moment of carelessness.

Take this stuff seriously, do it right and never stop being careful.

Ridgerunner665
September 27, 2011, 12:29 AM
When you undertake something as serious as carrying a loaded gun on your person for defense, then you owe it to yourself and everyone around you to be serious about it.

That is worthy of being repeated...loudly!

Truer words were never spoken...

1911Tuner
September 27, 2011, 07:28 AM
I find it interesting that a few months ago, something similar was posted with a Glock being the gun that went off, and the 1911 boys were all over it telling us how safe the 1911 is.

Yep. Too often, we're lulled into a false sense of "safety" with whatever design we're enamored of...and we get careless.

Don't be that guy. It's not a toy and it damn sure ain't your "Little Friend." It's as dangerous as a rattlesnake, and it should be regarded as hostile whenever your hand is on it.

Reholstering isn't something that is normally done in a hurry. Slow down. Pay attention.

Is gun. Gun not safe.

David E
September 27, 2011, 07:42 PM
I disagree with "gun not safe."

It's not like the old kid game "Time Bomb," where you wind up a toy bomb, tossing back and forth until it goes off.

A gun won't randomly and inexplicably go off by itself. THAT would be unsafe.

As long as we use safe gunhandling AND devote our full attention to it, they won't simply "go off."

"is gun, pay full attention as you handle it with respect."

bigfatdave
September 27, 2011, 11:26 PM
Read this article by CorneredCat in its entirety.
How to Safely Use a Belt Holster (http://corneredcat.com/Safety_Matters_How_to_Use_a_Belt_Holster)

Now ... after you've read the whole thing ...
Observe the last illustration in that article. THAT is how to place a gun in a holster, for a 1911 variant, you hold the hammer back and get off the grip safety.
You also pay 100% attention to what you're doing, use a holster that fits the weapon, don't force anything, and you don't do stuff that causes unnecessary administrative handling like taking the weapon off just to ride in a vehicle ... get a comfortable holster and use it properly.
Holstering in a belt holster is pretty much the same regardless of position, you shouldn't need to look even if the gun is in front.

OP, get some snap-caps, stand/sit in front of the idiot box, and practice a smooth (not fast!) draw and re-holster every commercial break. After a while, add in dry-firing at every phone#/website/celebrity endorser/vehicle/whatever that pops up on screen, and then smoothly re-inserting the weapon into the holster. You don't have to hurry, you don't have to force it, and if you're going to drop the hammer or fire the striker in a negligent fashion, better to do it with a snap-cap in the gun in private, rather than causing a hazard to the public and an embarrassment to responsible carriers. The more I think about this, the more I get annoyed, your methods are just a headline waiting to happen, and that headline will be written to make ME and EVERYONE ELSE look like dangerous idiots, too. On top of that, if you pulled that stunt somewhere secluded and actually injured yourself seriously, you could die quite rapidly from blood loss. I doubt your fishing kit has GSW treatment materials in it, in fact I'd be surprised if there was a FA kit in that vehicle or someone who knew how to use it under stress. Do try to take some effective measures to not punch holes in yourself without warning, changing guns won't solve the underlying problems here.

jerkface11
September 28, 2011, 06:01 PM
Yes, it does. Which version has the grip safety?

Exactly.

That grip safety didn't stop him from blowing a hole in his pants.

bigfatdave
September 28, 2011, 11:58 PM
That grip safety didn't stop him from blowing a hole in his pants. nothing was going to stop that from occurring until the OP learned how to handle a firearm

jojo200517
September 29, 2011, 12:26 AM
I bet in addition of being ripped to shreds the shorts had a strange odor and lots of brown stains. I know mine would have. Glad ya didn't ventilate your butt cheek.

Hope it didn't scare ya away from the 1911. Ya managed to defeat both the manual safety and the grip safety, and get the trigger pulled. 3 strikes against the operator and you got off lucky, may anger the glock guys but a glock would have give ya one chance before attempting to blow ya a new poop hole.

Tony_the_tiger
September 29, 2011, 12:37 AM
Oh man... close one. Glad you're ok.

Derry 1946
September 29, 2011, 12:38 AM
OK, I have read all these posts. I have been a revolver guy, and just bought my first 1911. (Only holster I have for it so far is an M3.) Would this AD (or whatever you want to call it) have happened if no round had been chambered? In other words, mag has rounds, but slide has not been racked, no round in chamber, hammer down, thumb safety on. In this condition, you can holster the weapon in such as way as to discharge untintentionally?

Thanks for all the info to date. OP, glad you are OK, and thanks for posting this useful warning.

Regards,
Derry

bigfatdave
September 29, 2011, 01:51 AM
Derry, the carry condition debate is endless, and if you want to have a handsgun instead of a handgun, then carry empty chamber all you like. If you're talking about a range toy, then it really doesn't matter.
And I'll point out that on a properly-functioning 1911-pattern gun the safety lever cannot be placed in the "more safe" position while the hammer is down/forward ... it simply doesn't work that way.
And if the "M3" is a military-style flapped shoulder holster, get a holster with retention and some ability to keep the safety lever from being bumped to the "less safe" position ... those things are scabbards more than holsters, they don't retain the gun and they don't protect the controls in a positive way. In a loose scabbard-type holster empty-chamber carry might be a good idea, even.

The hammer is locked to the sear by the thumb safety, the trigger is blocked by the grip safety, the trigger is protected by a proper holster, and the various safety devices are not ignored or defeated ... Condition 1 carry (round in chamber, manual safety engaged) is perfectly safe until you start waving the gun around in a forest of leather flaps with one on the trigger, one on the safety lever and your hand on the grip safety.

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=614182&highlight=condition+1
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=594906&highlight=condition+1
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=599143&highlight=condition+1
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=578300&highlight=condition+1

The OP did not have a 1911 problem, he had a negligent discharge caused by a holstering technique that would have set off most guns, possibly even including a DA revolver.

Dr_B
September 29, 2011, 02:31 AM
a holstering technique that would have set off most guns, possibly even including a DA revolver

So true. You don't want anything floppy or otherwise getting into the trigger guard. I carry a 1911 and I'm glad this guy posted his story. A story like this is good for keeping things sober. A healthy fear of the weapon helps keep one from becoming complacent.

RON in PA
September 29, 2011, 03:08 AM
Maybe there was a reason the US Army mode of carry was condition 3.

bigfatdave
September 29, 2011, 05:16 AM
Maybe there was a reason the US Army mode of carry was condition 3. sure, and keeping a snap-cap as your top round would be even safer, because you'd have to rack the slide TWICE while keeping someone from stabbing you.

Maybe the Army mandated C3 because the handgun wasn't the primary weapon and they didn't want to waste a bunch of time and money getting everyone a custom holster and teaching them how to use it. We have the luxury of choosing our own weaponry, and the responsibility to be extremely proficient with our chosen weapons.

1911Tuner
September 29, 2011, 06:41 AM
I disagree with "gun not safe."

As is your right.

The gun isn't "safe." No loaded gun can ever be completely "safe." Even Jeff Cooper alluded to that. If it were...it would be of little use. Safety is squarely on our shoulders.
We often learn that hard lesson when we get careless.

The US Military mandated Condition 3 carry for all infantry smallarms unless it looked like things were about to go sideways. (Line of departure, ladies. Lock and load.) Why? Because the Law of Averages says that sooner or later...somebody will get careless.

jerkface11
September 29, 2011, 04:41 PM
may anger the glock guys but a glock would have give ya one chance before attempting to blow ya a new poop hole.

LOL so the 1911 went off LESS than a Glock would have?

chhodge69
September 29, 2011, 05:53 PM
Do it wrong, as the OP did, and ANY flavor gun will fire.

RAINS
September 30, 2011, 04:27 AM
You know most of the time when I hear about accidental discharges it mostly seems to be Glock or 1911 related. In reality both are not as safe as a lot of other designs. Still they can be carried without issue. Glad you are ok. At least you were safe and did not have the mussel pointed right at your body. Thanks for posting too. We should all take a few moments to think about our carry setups.

bigfatdave
September 30, 2011, 05:40 AM
You know most of the time when I hear about accidental discharges it mostly seems to be Glock or 1911 related. In reality both are not as safe as a lot of other designs. hint - it is because they're two of the most common guns in the world!

1911Tuner
September 30, 2011, 07:29 AM
Most ND/AD events with Glocks are noted during reholstering the piece...or some variant of same....and somebody either forgot to get their trigger finger out of the trigger guard or an article of loose clothing caught the trigger on the way in. 2nd in line is during field-stripping..due to the requirement to pull the trigger before it can be disassembled when somebody forgets to clear the chamber before pulling the trigger.

It all comes back to carelessness and/or haste on the part of the user. Safety is our responsibility. The "safety" on the gun is no more than a backup system when our brains flame out that reduces the chances of a problem...and it's not infallible.

Is gun. Gun not safe. Man is safe...or unsafe...as the case may be.

hso
September 30, 2011, 07:53 AM
I'm relieved that you were lucky enough to escape with only minor injuries.

alongston
September 30, 2011, 10:39 AM
Wow glad you are OK. Thanks for the heads up. I think it's more a note on being careful when handling than a ding against the safety of the weapon in question. Thanks for that.

Derry 1946
September 30, 2011, 04:46 PM
Thanks, bigfatdave, for taking the time to clarify. Very enlightening. I've got small children, and safety is my top priority. :-)

Derry

460Kodiak
September 30, 2011, 05:12 PM
I'm glad nothing happened to you, and I'm certainly not trying to make light of the situation, but did you take any pictures of the shorts you were wearing? I kind of want to see the repercussions of this incident.

JohnKSa
September 30, 2011, 11:22 PM
Most ND/AD events with Glocks are noted during reholstering the piece...or some variant of same....and somebody either forgot to get their trigger finger out of the trigger guard or an article of loose clothing caught the trigger on the way in. 2nd in line is during field-stripping..due to the requirement to pull the trigger before it can be disassembled when somebody forgets to clear the chamber before pulling the trigger.Based on this poll, ND/ADs happen primarily when people pull the trigger, so your comment about field-stripping being a leading cause of ND/ADs with Glocks could be accurate. However, it's highly unlikely, if we give the poll responses any credence at all, that the number one cause of ND/ADs with any type of firearm is reholstering incidents.

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=114287

Bowhunter57
September 30, 2011, 11:45 PM
...did you take any pictures of the shorts you were wearing? I kind of want to see the repercussions of this incident
460Kodiak,
No pics. The shorts were completely destroyed. From just below the holster it looked like someone had pressed a limbsaw against my hip and right cheek of my butt and jerked straight down HARD. My underwear (boxers) were intact, but there were perforations in the material from the barrel ports (5 on each side).

These were cargo shorts and the rip was nearly the length of the leg material. The inside pocket was exposed, ripped open and my billfold exposed. There's a nick in the leather, on the upper right corner of my billfold that is a grim reminder of how close the 230gr. JHP passed by me. :uhoh:

I stood still for a moment, in shock and realized that there might be more damage to myself than I knew. My brother was telling me to get the shorts off so we could assess any physical damage. Dropping my shorts (what was left of them) revealed a line of barrel port burns and a 5" blood red stripe of muzzle blast from the 3" barrel. No bleeding, but some serious burn and concussion bruising. :barf:

This was about the time when I became very ill and nearly puked. The reality of what had just happened hit me, I hit a knee and thanked God. :) I've hunted with handguns for many years, without a single incident. Even so, there's no room for errors, irreguardless of the years of experience.

Again, Thank You, to all that have replied with concern for my well being. It is greatly appreciated. :cool:
Bowhunter57

orionengnr
October 1, 2011, 09:31 PM
Would this AD (or whatever you want to call it)
I'd call it an ND, because the firearm performed as it was designed to--the trigger was moved to the rear, the firing pin impacted the primer, and h=the bullet exited the barrel.

When holstering a 1911, it is my technique to keep my right thumb in contact with and pressing upward on the thumb safety.

I'm no Jeff Cooper, but I understand physics and How Stuff Works. :)

Bowhunter57
October 1, 2011, 11:46 PM
When holstering a 1911, it is my technique to keep my right thumb in contact with and pressing upward on the thumb safety.

orionengnr,
I'd say that would be a first class way to handle holstering any 1911. :) I never liked the ambi-safety on my SA and had entertained thoughts of replacing it with a single side safety.

I'm not sure why they design the ambi-safety the way they do, but both sides stick out away from the frame/body of the pistol. This "bat-wing" design is just another chance for something to get caught on it and allow it to get switched off. I much prefer the single side safety, as it's right up against the frame/body of the pistol.

I won't say that I'll never own another one, but if I do, it won't be for a CCW. :p

Bowhunter57

1911Tuner
October 2, 2011, 06:33 AM
However, it's highly unlikely, if we give the poll responses any credence at all, that the number one cause of ND/ADs with any type of firearm is reholstering incidents.

The term "Glock Leg" wasn't coined because people were unintentionally firing the gun during field-stripping, unless they have a really strange technique for that exercise.

It's very common...especially among law enforcement...to report such an occurrence as a malfunction, when it's actually due to having the finger on the trigger as the gun is reholstered...or something else engaged it as it went in. Since pulling the trigger is the way the gun is fired, it has to be one or the other. They either don't want to admit their mistake, or they simply aren't even aware of it. I suspect that it's the latter in most instances.

In 1910, the US Cavalry requested a manual safety on the new pistol in progress so that mounted troopers could safely reholster the piece in order to free up both hands when they found themselves trying to hang onto a frightened horse.

Even in those unenlightened days, the boys on the ordnance board recognized that a man...especially if he's under stress...may forget to take his finger out of the trigger guard before jamming it into its holster. Either Gaston failed to realize this, or he chose to ignore it. Since he borrowed Browning's basic tilt barrel/short recoil/locked breech design, it's hard for me to believe that he didn't at least consider what the manual safety was actually put there for...unless he, like so many other people, assumed that it was for cocked and locked carry. "Cocked and Locked, the way JMB intended!" is a myth.

murf
October 2, 2011, 12:22 PM
bowhunter57,

sure hate to see a 1911 go to "safe prison". maybe you can practice a new draw and holster technique that will ease your mind and keep the grip safety on.

murf

Bowhunter57
October 2, 2011, 09:44 PM
murf,
Thank you for the kind words of instruction, but I have already sold the SA to a friend of mine for $500 and he was happy to get it. :) I have a M&Pc on order to replace it.

Bowhunter57

JohnKSa
October 2, 2011, 11:05 PM
The term "Glock Leg" wasn't coined because people were unintentionally firing the gun during field-stripping, unless they have a really strange technique for that exercise.Of course it wasn't. Clearly it refers to reholstering incidents. What I was pointing out was that while reholstering incidents clearly do result in ND/ADs, I haven't seen any statistics (even informal ones) to indicate that reholstering incidents are the leading cause of Glock ND/ADs.

What's more, the poll I linked to indicates that the most common cause of ND/ADs (41%) is pulling the trigger on purpose. It's out in front by a margin of about 25% compared to the next most common cause which was pulling the trigger by mistake.

Which says that it's highly unlikely, if we give the poll responses any credence at all, that the number one cause of ND/ADs with any type of firearm is reholstering incidents. The poll makes it pretty plain that the number one cause of ND/ADs, across the board, and by a wide margin, is intentionally pulling the trigger but expecting the gun not to fire for one reason or another.

Ben86
October 2, 2011, 11:16 PM
That's one of the dangers of using a leather holster. This is one reason I have entirely switched to kydex holsters.

1911Tuner
October 3, 2011, 12:25 PM
Clearly it refers to reholstering incidents. What I was pointing out was that while reholstering incidents clearly do result in ND/ADs, I haven't seen any statistics (even informal ones) to indicate that reholstering incidents are the leading cause of Glock ND/ADs.

Well..."Glock Leg" didn't arise from AD/ND occurrences while field stripping. A tag like that only comes from fairly commonplace things like "Hammer Bite" and "Garand Thumb" that are associated forever more with the 1911 and the M1. Say'em...and pretty much everybody knows what you're talkin' about.

I suppose one could venture a guess that there are as many or more Glock AD/NDs during the field strip process...but those don't get as much attention as the ones that result in bullet holes in one's booty...and likely go unreported out of plain embarrassment. Much harder to hide a gunshot wound and a lot harder to explain one that starts at or above mid-thigh and travels lengthwise to the lower regions.

Many people...myself included...view unintentional discharges like the pilot's axiom. i.e. "Any landing that you can walk away from is a good landing."

Any AD/ND that doesn't get anybody hurt or killed ain't all that bad.
Embarrassing. Humbling. Frightening. Sometimes expensive...but essentially, it don't mean nothin'.

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