Polymer Revolvers


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Hunter125
September 28, 2011, 09:21 PM
I was wondering what you guys think about the small polymer revolvers. I'm thinking about something like the S&W Bodyguard, the LCR, and the Taurus Protector series.
I guess I'm comfortable with polymer autos, but just don't have any experience with the polymer revolvers.
Would you trust a polymer revolver as much as a polymer auto?

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tekarra
September 28, 2011, 09:29 PM
I have only seen them at gun shows and have never shot one. For me, a polymer revolver would take some getting used to.

The Lone Haranguer
September 28, 2011, 09:47 PM
I don't know about the S&W, but on the Ruger, the part of the frame surrounding the cylinder is metal (aluminum alloy) and essentially only the grip section and trigger group housing are plastic. This only has to take the stress of being pushed back into your hand under recoil, which a good plastic should have no trouble handling. The forces exerted on a revolver frame are different from that of an auto's.

bikemutt
September 28, 2011, 09:55 PM
The Ruger LCR has probably been beat to death here so I won't add to it. Until I saw your post I never realized it was part polymer. I think these days the manufacturers know where they can successfully use materials and where they cannot.

To whit: I once owned a Dodge Cummins turbo diesel truck where the intercooler failed prematurely. It was made of plastic. The replacement, covered under warranty, was made of metal. Even the repairman couldn't divine what on earth they were thinking when they tried the switch to plastic for that part.

I suppose I'll become alarmed when I see a gun's barrel and chamber made of plastic, but until then, polymer has it's good place in my experience.

Bush Pilot
September 29, 2011, 01:11 AM
I was wondering what you guys think about the small polymer revolvers. I'm thinking about something like the S&W Bodyguard, the LCR, and the Taurus Protector series.
I guess I'm comfortable with polymer autos, but just don't have any experience with the polymer revolvers.
Would you trust a polymer revolver as much as a polymer auto?
I have an LCR and love the gun, it probably has 3,000 rounds fired in 18 months (very gentle loads, I don't enjoy hot ammo) I would trust this gun without question. Will it last many thousands of hot loads? That's hard to say, mine will never be subjected to that kind of abuse.

Drail
September 29, 2011, 08:57 AM
I would almost be willing to bet that if someone produced and aggressively marketed it they could probably sell a V8 engine made entirely from plastics. Would I buy one? Probably not. It's stronger than steel though, right? Heck, why don't we make the bullets and cases and primers from plastic? It's stronger than steel, right? How about a main battle tank made from polymers? Polymers are being used in firearm manufacturing because they're CHEAP to manufacture. Not because they have any advantage over high grade steel.

Skribs
September 29, 2011, 12:20 PM
Cheaper and lighter, Drail. Weight is an important aspect here.

bergmen
September 29, 2011, 01:21 PM
Cheaper and lighter, Drail. Weight is an important aspect here.

As well as lack of corrosion susceptibility, highly integrated features that come with the molded part (rather than having to machine them in), resistant to scratching and other mechanical/cosmetic damage, a subtle ability to absorb rather than transmit certain shock loads, etc. The list goes on.

As a Mechanical Engineer I deal with injection molded plastics on a daily basis. They have their roll but they are not the be-all, end-all in materials choices or fabrication methodologies (depending on the application).

For firearms frames they can be an excellent choice as Glock, Ruger, etc. has demonstrated. I own both Glocks and a Ruger LCR. Outstanding choice of fabrication technology and material choice in my opinion.

Dan

antiquus
September 29, 2011, 01:22 PM
Cheaper. lighter, absorbs recoil - smart use of materials.

OldCavSoldier
September 29, 2011, 01:36 PM
I'm an old-school guy who owns only one "polymer" handgun...an S&W M&P. Everything else is metal-framed, and, except for two "alloy" framed snubbies, blued carbon or stainless steel. Friends who own polymer guns swear by them and they do have a place, but, for me, I'll stick with old technology....

I love old things: old guns, old whiskey, old cars, old women.....errrrr.....strike that last one and re-state old WOMAN.....

Standing Wolf
September 29, 2011, 02:53 PM
I don't drink tea out of plastic mugs, either.

valnar
September 29, 2011, 03:31 PM
The classic things being appraised on Antiques Roadshow are not made of plastic. I'm just sayin'...

BCCL
September 29, 2011, 04:50 PM
I'm anxiously awaiting a polymer framed Ruger Blackhawk or New Vaquero.........


:) NOT!

ForumSurfer
September 29, 2011, 05:04 PM
Loved my LCR.

Positives


Best out of the bocx trigger out of any revolver that competes with it IMHO
Cheap (price)! $400 new with tamer grips.
Soft shooter IMHO (and my 11 year old's opinion) even with +p 38.
I like the way it looks...call me crazy. I prefer blue steel and wood, but I still love the way it looks.
Light weight, carries well.
Disappears IWB or OWB and a delight to carry.
Made in the USA

Negatives



It is polymer!!! <insert heresy accusations here>
It is polymer. I like to shoot. Sooner or later, plastic or airweight revolvers will flex and wear out faster than a steel model.

My fault, not the gun's fault.



Doesn't fit MY pockets very well. Very noticeable in MY pockets. If I'm going to alter my dress, I may as well carry something bigger with more rounds.

bergmen
September 29, 2011, 06:15 PM
Loved my LCR.

Negatives



It is polymer!!! <insert heresy accusations here>
It is polymer. I like to shoot. Sooner or later, plastic or airweight revolvers will flex and wear out faster than a steel model.



Do you have any demonstrated examples of this? Piles of destroyed Glocks? Any examples of a polymer framed handgun "flexing and wearing out"?

I know of none but I'm willing to learn.

Dan

captain awesome
September 29, 2011, 07:34 PM
Would I trust a polymer revolver as much as a polymer semi auto?
Yes. But that's not hard to do when you generally don't trust semi autos

skidder
September 29, 2011, 08:53 PM
I'm confused? Don't plastic toy guns come with orange safety tips? :D

460Kodiak
September 30, 2011, 11:13 AM
I just recently bought my first polymer gun, an FNP45. I was of the "plastic? NOOOOO" group for a long time, and then I realized that polymer semi autos have been around and succesful for quite a while. That FN's parts are mostly polymer and stainless steel, and I was looking for a tool, nothing more. That gun is exactly that, a tool, and a seemingly durable one that I believe will give me years of reliable service. I plan to purchase a Ruger LCR for pocket carry sooner than later. I think the manufacturers know what they are doing, and that gun has been on the market for a while now. I plan to get the .357 version, because like the FN, it is made of stainless steel and polymers, though I doubt I'll shoot many hot loads out of it. The .38 versions are made of the alluminum alloy and polymers.

I think it's really a matter of what you want the gun to be. If you want a tool that can get banged around and isn't really for looking at, then a poly gun seems appropriate. If you want a looker, then get a nice revolver or a 1911.

dashootist
September 30, 2011, 11:20 AM
CAlling pistols, like Glocks or LCRs, polymer is like calling a modern automobile a plastic car. Sure, the driver is surrounded by plastic. But beneath the surface, it's all metal. To me, the LCR is just a regular revolver will expensive plastic grip

Fiv3r
September 30, 2011, 01:24 PM
I've owned an LCR for about 15 months. It's been a fantastic shooter. Several thousand rounds and no hint of any real wear short of a couple of nicks/scratches in the aluminum frame from daily carry.

I bought it to retire my heirloom S&W 36. Short of the old school clockwork, the 36 really doesn't offer anything that the LCR doesn't. The LCR is a comfortable, lightweight, carry piece. My favorite fall/early winter EDC.

Old John
September 30, 2011, 05:06 PM
I have harried a Ruger SP101, .357 for 8+ years. I practiced firing it in DAO, a lot.
When the LCR revolvers came out, the 1st one I could find to buy was a .38 special. I liked it after a couple hundred rounds through it, without a problem. So, I bought the .357 LCR. It's a few ounces heavier, I think about 3.5 ounces.
After a couple boxes of WWB LHJHP's and some WWB 125gr. SP's, I started carrying it instead of my SP101. It is so much lighter. At SD ranges. it does as good a job as the old SP101. It jumps a bit more, Yes! ButI like it. I carry it every day in an OSWB holster with shirt untucked.
When we are going out somewhere nice & I need to tuck my shirt tail, I put the LCR, 38 special in my front side pocket. It's an easy carry. I love my LCR's.
Polymer? What polymer? They may not be the prettiest handguns to a lot of guys.
Old F.Gump says "Pretty is as pretty does".

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