What would you say the best speedloader brand is.


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MUSICALGUNNUT45
October 2, 2011, 12:39 AM
I like safariland and don't care for HKS. What do you guys like to use.

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Owen Sparks
October 2, 2011, 12:49 AM
The best "speed loader" is the full moon clip.

There is no faster way to load a revolver.

DeMilled
October 2, 2011, 01:05 AM
Dude....
http://www.5starfirearms.com/357_j.html

Does it get any more sexy?
My wife wants two for her SP101 and I am eating ramen noodles to save enough money so I can buy several for my GP100.

MUSICALGUNNUT45
October 2, 2011, 01:10 AM
The best "speed loader" is the full moon clip.

There is no faster way to load a revolver.
I don't like moonclips that much If they get bent while your carrying your screwed.

Gordon
October 2, 2011, 01:16 AM
Safariland Comp is pretty good on a K frame.

MUSICALGUNNUT45
October 2, 2011, 01:22 AM
Dude....
http://www.5starfirearms.com/357_j.html

Does it get any more sexy?
My wife wants two for her SP101 and I am eating ramen noodles to save enough money so I can buy several for my GP100.
Wow me likey

DeMilled
October 2, 2011, 01:28 AM
Plastic, or billet aluminum?

Check the price difference and ask the question again.

I do have to say; I have Safariland speed loaders and use them with both SP101 and GP100 and they work.

Billet aluminum speed loaders are on my "I NEED THIS!" list.

For a first time buyer, go billet aluminum and never have to buy twice, like me.

sidheshooter
October 2, 2011, 01:41 AM
So long as the 5star have come up, does anyone own some? how secure, smooth and durable are they? Do you think that they can handle repeated dropping on indoor range floors during training? I like the looks...

Warp
October 2, 2011, 02:12 AM
I don't have much experience with them but the push-to-release design of the Safariland loaders is pretty nice.

imoXu
October 2, 2011, 05:00 AM
I have the 5star speedloaders and loading tray, for my 327 M&PR8.
They were the only 8 shot speedloaders I could find so it made the choice easy.
I am extremely happy with the quality and function.
not too excited about the price but I couldnt find anything else.
as said the quality and function is very good.
THey hold the rounds with very little wiggle.

I atually prefer these speedloaders to the moonclips I have and am faster with these. Not much difference though. Mainly because the moonclip and brass combination I have seem to be pretty wobbly and with the 8 shot, loaded with SWC, or worse BNWC, it can get tricky if you are rushing.
Although I can carry more clips on my belt and gear and they do keep the empties in one place. I dont really have any way of carrying the speedloaders except in a pocket. THey do make a leather pouch though I think.

Very simple twist action to them. The aluminum body of them is solid and the release mechanism is very simple so I am expecting these to last a long time.
Could they handle repeated dropping on a hard conrete floor?
When they are empty they are quite light and well built, so I would say yes there is close to zero chance that a drop would break them.
They might get scratched but I cant see them breaking.

I have one in my hand right now.
Honestly I think I could stamp on it and not hurt it.
Id imaging the 6 shot ones are even more solid.

SAve up and get them, Im glad I did.

moX

Blue Brick
October 2, 2011, 06:59 AM
Bianchi Speed Strips

sniper5
October 2, 2011, 07:57 AM
S. L. Variants are supposed to be the best but they are expensive and hard to find. I think www.bobmacs.com has them. Think of a Safariland Comp 3 in the same size as an HKS with individual springs driving each cartridge. Personally I like Safariland Comp 2's.

357Shooter
October 2, 2011, 08:08 AM
I own several 5 Star they work great, I don't drop them much, but I don't think it would hurt a thing, they are very well made.

MrBorland
October 2, 2011, 08:24 AM
My personal preference is for cut down JetLoaders for competition. Safariland CompIIs for carry.

http://i415.photobucket.com/albums/pp239/becke016/GunsTargets/JetLoader1.jpg

Big Juan
October 2, 2011, 08:28 AM
5-Star loaders SO outclass the plastic and pot metal HKS's I bought, I'm almost ashamed to put my HKS loaders on the bench. The Safarilands, I believe are a bit quicker, but I've not heard how well they hold up. One other thing, the 5-Stars turn the opposite direction of the HKS brand. You might ding up the aluminum 5 stars, but you'll have to shoot them to destroy them...and that loading block.. is de shizzle!

Dr.Rob
October 3, 2011, 12:42 AM
Ok those 5Star loaders are like works of art, if they perform as good as they look I'm sold. Did not see one made for a Colt DS though.

Meanwhile I've used HKS because they were inexpensive and if I 'broke' one somehow I wouldn't be out a chunk of change.

Nothing is faster to me than a moonclip.

NMPOPS
October 3, 2011, 12:48 AM
HKS for me. I have some that are over 30 years old and are as solid as the day I bought. What more can you ask.

Sent from my Ally

Tony_the_tiger
October 3, 2011, 12:51 AM
I have 6 HKS and they work great.

David E
October 3, 2011, 01:45 PM
Safariland Comp II's are the best all around speedloaders. Compact, durable, secure and consistent.

Why they don't offer them in more calibers and frame sizes is a mystery.

Red Cent
October 3, 2011, 04:08 PM
Safariland Comp III.

McBorland. What is the advantage of cutting the skirt?

F-111 John
October 3, 2011, 04:32 PM
I own both HKS and Safariland Comp I, and I prefer the Safariland hands down.

Kaeto
October 3, 2011, 05:12 PM
5 Star says they have speedloaders for Charter Arms .38s but in the list they use the same model numbers as Taurus and Charter don't have those kind of model designations.

MrBorland
October 3, 2011, 07:34 PM
McBorland. What is the advantage of cutting the skirt?

It doesn't make for a faster reload, per se, but it does lessen the chance of a bobbled reload. The skirt does little or nothing to hold the rounds, so it's excess material that rounds can hang up on during the reload.

The skirt does stabilize the rounds as they're being loaded into the speedloader, though, so cutting the skirt can make loading them tricky if you don't have steady hands. I cut about half the skirt off mine, and I can still load mine by hand, without the use of a loading tray. I've seen them where nearly all the skirt was removed, in which case, a loading tray is a necessity.

rjrivero
October 3, 2011, 08:51 PM
The best "speed loader" is the full moon clip.

There is no faster way to load a revolver.

Stamped spring steel is by far my favorite.

RX-178
October 3, 2011, 09:05 PM
HKS Speedloaders here, with the skirt cut down.

I prefer the twist-knob type of release over the Safariland because I practice releasing the rounds into my hand, in the event I'm just topping off after firing only 2-3 rounds, and am out of, or wasn't carrying any loose rounds.

Warp
October 3, 2011, 09:13 PM
I don't think I would, personally, feel comfortable trying to 'tactically reload' a revolver by removing and replacing only the spent cases. That sounds fairly time consuming, tedious and attention demanding for a situation where you think you may still need a pistol with which to defend yourself. How quickly can you repeatedly perform that task?

Red Cent
October 3, 2011, 09:13 PM
Dean cuts his off also but I have not bugged him about it.

"....but it does lessen the chance of a bobbled reload."

May I ask you to expand on this? I use Comp IIIs with my Dan Wesson. Since both types agressively eject the rounds into the chambers, I am really not seeing this.

David E
October 3, 2011, 09:14 PM
Stamped spring steel is by far my favorite.

Until it bends.

Moonclips are fine on the range where you can use range-only holders for them.

There are not too many practical ways to carry one concealed on the street and they don't carry well in a pocket.

David E
October 3, 2011, 09:20 PM
I prefer the twist-knob type of release because I practice releasing the rounds into my hand, in the event I'm just topping off after firing only 2-3 rounds, and am out of, or wasn't carrying any loose rounds.

That's not a very good way to do that.

A better way is to carry belt mounted loops (Bianchi makes a 6 rd snap on unit) so you can "top off" after firing 2-3 rds. (and you counted correctly)

The best way is to do a speed reload.

RX-178
October 3, 2011, 09:40 PM
Well obviously loops for individual rounds would be BETTER than releasing speedloader rounds into your hand.

But those loops don't magically replenish themselves after being used.

I still practice releasing the speedloader into my palm, dumping the rounds into a pocket, and then using them to top off the cylinder, and because of that I prefer twist-knob style speedloaders over the Safariland style.

David E
October 3, 2011, 09:45 PM
Well obviously loops for individual rounds would be BETTER than releasing speedloader rounds into your hand.

But those loops don't magically replenish themselves after being used.

But a speedloader you just robbed 2 rounds from does? :confused:


I still practice releasing the speedloader into my palm, dumping the rounds into a pocket, and then using them to top off the cylinder...

I'm going to hazard a guess and say this is a technique you thought of.....right?

Warp
October 3, 2011, 09:54 PM
I still think it's a less-than-good idea. That is awful lot of fine motor skill, concentration, and attention to detail for a potentially life-or-death situation where you just fired your pistol in defense and think you may have to fire it again...and also a lot of time with the cylinder open and the pistol not immediately ready for action.

I'd rather not open the cylinder at all or simply dump it and replace with 6 fresh. hell, if you really want to go that route why not get to cover, dump the cylinder, replace with the 6 from your speedloader, then pick up the good rounds from the ground and stick them in your pocket. One at a time while being very situationally aware, of course. Or just dump them, leave them, and keep working on getting the hell out of there.

RX-178
October 3, 2011, 09:59 PM
Okay, let's get a few things out of the way first.

I rarely carry revolvers anyway, but when I do, I prefer to carry BOTH loose rounds for topping off the cylinder, as well as speedloaders for reloading when I shoot it empty. (never used speed strips, although I keep telling myself I should try them out sometime)

When the loose rounds are used up, I'll take a speedloader, release the rounds into my hand, and use those to top off the cylinder, because I prefer to do that, rather than potentially dump 3-4 perfectly good rounds onto the ground.

And while it might not be a technique I've ever heard professionally taught, I learned it from a retired former-SFPD cop who carried a Colt Python his entire career. I'm not sure what they're even called, but on his duty belt (which he still has), he kept these little leather pouches that dumped 6 individual rounds into your palm when you opened them.

Releasing the speedloader into my palm does basically the same thing.

MrBorland
October 3, 2011, 10:08 PM
"....but it does lessen the chance of a bobbled reload."

May I ask you to expand on this? I use Comp IIIs with my Dan Wesson. Since both types agressively eject the rounds into the chambers, I am really not seeing this.

For the speediest reloads, the speedloader should freely fall away the instant the rounds release. With an uncut skirt, the speedloader tries to fall away, but catches some rim before all the rounds completely drop in. The speedloader doesn't fall away, and the rounds don't drop in. A bobbled reload. :fire:

Another source of hangup can be the center plunger when it contact the inner ejector rod. If the plunger's hollow, filling it in with JB weld prevents this hangup (see pic).

http://i415.photobucket.com/albums/pp239/becke016/GunsTargets/JetLoader2.jpg

hank327
October 3, 2011, 10:11 PM
I've used both HKS and Safariland speedloaders and MUCH prefer the Safarilands. They hold the rounds better and the "push" release of the rounds seems more intuitive to me than the twist of the HKS. For carrying rounds to "top off" my revolver, I'd carry a spare speed strip to hold the rounds instead of carrying loose rounds or taking them from a speed loader.

Warp
October 3, 2011, 10:20 PM
When the loose rounds are used up, I'll take a speedloader, release the rounds into my hand, and use those to top off the cylinder, because I prefer to do that, rather than potentially dump 3-4 perfectly good rounds onto the ground.


How would you dump 3-4 rounds onto the ground?

Have you used Safariland speedloaders?

And you think you won't potentially dump good rounds on the ground while dumping the speedloader into your hand to load them by hand??

RX-178
October 3, 2011, 10:35 PM
How would you dump 3-4 rounds onto the ground?

In this instance I'm talking specifically about topping off the cylinder after having fired only two or three rounds. I do this because of how few rounds a revolver holds. It might just be me, but I prefer keeping it fully loaded as much as possible.

Since I /do/ like to reload after firing, just simply using a speedloader would mean I'd have to empty the entire cylinder, which could have 3-4 perfectly good rounds still in it at the time.

It doesn't confuse me because topping off the cylinder is always me making a conscious choice that I have an opportunity to top off, and following through.

Reloading from a speedloader (which I also practice) is more of a reaction to the gun going *click* instead of *bang* as opposed to making a decision to reload.

Have you used Safariland speedloaders?

No, I haven't. When I was shopping for speedloaders, the description on how they work made me think that it'd be difficult to release the rounds into my hand using those. They're also more EXPENSIVE than the HKS, which was another reason I didn't buy them. Nobody I know has Safariland speedloaders that I could try out, otherwise I would give them a shot.

And you think you won't potentially dump good rounds on the ground while dumping the speedloader into your hand to load them by hand??

I don't 'think' in this case, this is actually something I practice when running my revolver (yeah, I only have one as of yet). I may not practice it nearly as regularly as my autoloaders, but I'm pretty darned confident of it already. It helps that I don't fumble around with 6 individual rounds in my hand (that sounds insane even to me, even though that former SFPD cop that I learned from made it look easy).

I take the speedloader, and hold it so that the tips of the bullets are pointed back towards my wrist, and pressing lightly into my palm. Then I use my thumb and fingers to go around the sides of the loader, and twist the knob to release the rounds into my hand, and let the loader fall to the ground.

Then I just dump the loose rounds into a pocket and fish out however many I'm trying to load.

Warp
October 3, 2011, 10:41 PM
That sounds slow as hell.

I cannot wrap my head around intentionally using a speedloader to empty into your hand, then dump into a pocket, then take back out to begin loading into the gun.

RX-178
October 3, 2011, 10:51 PM
Well, I'd only ever be doing this if I was not carrying loose rounds, or had already used them up reloading prior.

I really ended up practicing this a lot at the range, where I would use up my loose rounds, and start emptying my speedloaders into my hand and pocketing the rounds, rather than stopping and opening up my ammo can or ammo boxes again.

carbuncle
October 3, 2011, 10:53 PM
I had the HKS loaders for my 85, never had a problem with them.

Buford57
October 3, 2011, 10:58 PM
A second revolver.

Short of that I prefer the HKS, although I tried a Safariland Comp II in a K-frame .38 recently and was impressed by how great an improvement they are over the originals (i.e. they actually work).

I was forced to carry Safarilands during the early 80s, and to buy them out of my personal funds. About one in three would actually release the rounds reliably. In one case I had to use a hammer to get the ammo out. When I found two that (usually) worked I put them in the pouches on my Sam Brown for inspection and put HKS loaders in my jacket or pants pockets and Bianchi Speed Strips in my shirt pockets.

Honestly, the memory of frantically "pushing to release" on the clock, then "beating with fist to release" and finally "stomping with boot to release" all the while imaging doing this under fire is enough to relegate the new Safarilands to range use only. The HKS may be potmetal and plastic, but you know the first time you use it whether it is defective and I have one that has been on the job for over 30 years and never failed. IIRC it cost $3.95 new.

I'll date myself even more by saying that when the Safarilands were mandated they replaced dump boxes holding 6 loose rounds each. Since Stage One of our course of fire was "Load six, fire two, load two, fire six, load six, fire six". You got pretty good at ejecting and loading individual rounds and making sure the pouch was snapped tight after you "loaded two". I get a kick out of the TV commandos swapping magazines in a tactical reload when they get "down" to 8 rounds.

David E
October 3, 2011, 11:18 PM
I rarely carry revolvers anyway,

THATS good!

but when I do, I prefer to carry BOTH loose rounds for topping off the cylinder, as well as speedloaders for reloading when I shoot it empty. (never used speed strips, although I keep telling myself I should try them out sometime)

How do you carry the loose rounds? At the bottom of your pocket? Do you have anything else in those pockets, like loose change, etc? Speed strips have been available for at least 30+ yrs. Might be time to check them out.

When the loose rounds are used up,

Let me get this straight, you just fired your gun for blood, a person or persons is bleeding, dying or dead at your feet, but there might be more badguys around, so you bypass your speedloader and instead use the slowest possible reloading method by fishing for loose rounds at the bottom of your pocket (presuming no loose change is mixed in) drag them out 2-3 rds at a time.....you could almost reload a cap and ball revolver as fast!

I'll take a speedloader, release the rounds into my hand, and use those to top off the cylinder, because I prefer to do that, rather than potentially dump 3-4 perfectly good rounds onto the ground.

Your priority should be getting your defense gun fully loaded as fast as possible!

I learned it from a retired former-SFPD cop who carried a Colt Python his entire career. (he used dump pouches) that dropped 6 individual rounds into your palm when you opened them.

Ok, so a cop that either pre-dated speedloaders or was too lazy to learn how to work them is the impetus for this absurd technique?? It's an outdated technique that has long since been eclipsed by technology.

Releasing the speedloader into my palm does basically the same thing.

No, it's ignoring the technology available to you that could save your life.

If that same cop told you that rotary phones, 8-tracks and black and white tv's were all the technology you really need, would you still follow his sage advice?

RX-178
October 4, 2011, 12:29 AM
THATS good!

I'm attempting to keep this a civil debate. I politely request that we maintain it as such.


How do you carry the loose rounds? At the bottom of your pocket? Do you have anything else in those pockets, like loose change, etc? Speed strips have been available for at least 30+ yrs. Might be time to check them out.

Loose change goes into the front portion of a wallet on my belt. The lower right cargo pocket on my jacket (my most common concealing garment) is always empty, not specifically for loose rounds, but because I don't have anything that I carry in that pocket. Loose rounds that I'd be carrying from the get-go, would be 12 rounds in one of those folding ammo carrier things (Uncle Mike's if I'm not mistaken) that would be on the right side of my belt in front of my holster. Two speedloaders would be behind my holster.

Let me get this straight, you just fired your gun for blood, a person or persons is bleeding, dying or dead at your feet, but there might be more badguys around, so you bypass your speedloader and instead use the slowest possible reloading method by fishing for loose rounds at the bottom of your pocket (presuming no loose change is mixed in) drag them out 2-3 rds at a time.....you could almost reload a cap and ball revolver as fast!

Nope. If I just fired my gun in defense, and there could be more badguys around, I'm scanning for other threats first. I still have ammo in the gun, and I'm still in the fight if it's not over with. If I /had/ shot it empty on the first guy, I'd be reloading with a speedloader the moment I hear it go *click* instead of *bang*, because that's how I practice.

Your priority should be getting your defense gun fully loaded as fast as possible!

I just prefer not to dump usable rounds when I'm quick enough pulling the spent cases and loading from the cartridge holder. I prefer not to assume that I'm not going to need those rounds that would be dumped to the ground.

Ok, so a cop that either pre-dated speedloaders or was too lazy to learn how to work them is the impetus for this absurd technique?? It's an outdated technique that has long since been eclipsed by technology.

Well, I don't happen to live next door to Thunder Ranch and this gentleman was kind enough to teach me how he learned to run a revolver. In my opinion, he was darned good at it too. Also, I've never once said that I don't reload using speedloaders, just that I prefer HKS over Safariland because I can release the rounds from the loader to load individually if the situation calls for it. Since I practice loading rounds individually, I accept that the situation may eventually call for doing so.

No, it's ignoring the technology available to you that could save your life.

Again, I /DO/ use speedloaders to reload. In the manner they were meant for, the entire cylinder at a time. I reload that way whenever I hear the wheelgun go *click* instead of *bang*. When I'm in a situation where I can assess the situation, and decide that I have an opportunity to reload a partially fired cylinder, I will pull the fired casings individually, and reload those chambers individually.

If not? I'm probably in a situation where I should keep shooting, and then reload from the speedloader when the cylinder's fully empty.

David E
October 4, 2011, 12:50 AM
If I fired rounds in self defense and I'm using a revolver, the priority is to get the gun back up to full capacity in the shortest time possible. Doing it your way is the slowest way possible, because your priority is misplaced.

What do you do with the 3-4 loose rounds left over from the speedloader?

At the very least, dump the spent and unspent rounds into your hand, pocket it all, then complete the reload via speedloader.

RX-178
October 4, 2011, 01:04 AM
What do you do with the 3-4 loose rounds left over from the speedloader?

They'd still be in my pocket, unless there was a hole in it or something...

magtf388
October 4, 2011, 10:31 AM
Best Bar-None are the S.L. Variant models found at Bobby Macs.

http://www.bobmacs.com/accessories.html

Used and carried daily and no issue. If you don't know the bobmacs site, worth a look. I have never seen a holster from him but have the S.L. Variant for my Det Spec and my Mod 13

Black Knight
October 4, 2011, 11:01 AM
The best speedloader, that's simple, a second gun. All joking aside, I have used both HKS and Safariland for duty use. Both are good the only real difference is the way they are loaded and released. The HKS uses a knob system that is twisted to lock and unlock. Safariland is springloaded and released by a button that activates when it contact the cylinder. Both are good and fast. It is personal choice as to which is used. I started with the HKS and that is what I choose but I am equally pleased Safariland. Thankfully both are relatively inexpensive so try both. Good luck and stay safe.

SharpsDressedMan
October 4, 2011, 11:14 AM
I'll go with 5star. Very nicely made. http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m247/matquig/DSC05679.jpg

Red Cent
October 4, 2011, 11:54 AM
Thanks MrBorland.

David E
October 4, 2011, 12:20 PM
They'd still be in my pocket, unless there was a hole in it or something...

So you release the rounds from the speedloader while it's still in your pocket?

Warp
October 4, 2011, 03:11 PM
Apparently he has the gun in one hand and the speedloader/rounds in another, while another hand turns the knob on the speedloader and then loads them into the gun.

I'm actually curious how this works.

How do you hold the gun...and keep rounds from falling out...while emptying the speed loader into your hands and then putting those rounds into the gun? Do you release the speedloader with the fingers on the hand that is holding it and then use only that hand to hold the 6 rounds while selectively pulling several from the cylinder and then replacing them?

Friendly, Don't Fire!
October 4, 2011, 03:31 PM
HKS

When I see all the stuff out there, one can really go overboard in a hurry, if they are not careful!
Anymore, I buy what I need to be functional and leave the rest for others to buy.

OldCavSoldier
October 4, 2011, 04:57 PM
HKS for me. I have many and they have worked well for lots of years. The only problem I have with them is keeping them in my pocket and range bag....sons and friends and sons of friends always seem to get given one/some when all of a sudden they just gotta have one of the Old Cav Soldier's speed loaders for whattever reason or another.....:rolleyes:

RX-178
October 4, 2011, 07:51 PM
Apparently he has the gun in one hand and the speedloader/rounds in another, while another hand turns the knob on the speedloader and then loads them into the gun.

I'm actually curious how this works.

How do you hold the gun...and keep rounds from falling out...while emptying the speed loader into your hands and then putting those rounds into the gun? Do you release the speedloader with the fingers on the hand that is holding it and then use only that hand to hold the 6 rounds while selectively pulling several from the cylinder and then replacing them?

I open the cylinder and hold the revolver in my left hand, like you would do for any traditional right-hand reload for the weapon.

I pull the spent casings FIRST. I wouldn't want to be juggling any live rounds while doing that, whether they came from a cartridge holder, or a pocket.

Then I take the speedloader in my right hand, and position it so the tips of the bullets are against my palm. Closing my hand around the speedloader, I can reach the release knob with my thumb and fingers. All 6 rounds are released into my hand, and I can push the speedloader away with my thumb and let it drop.

Then dump the 6 rounds into my jacket pocket and fish out two that I'm going to be reloading with.

stevekozak
October 4, 2011, 08:38 PM
I can only assume folks are delibrately misunderstanding RX-178's technique. I am tired as hell, and I understood exactly what he said the first time. It is not a terrible idea, and I applaud his training on a couple of different systems to reload his gun. If it works for him, then props to him. I may give it a try this weekend to see how well it actually works.

Now, back to the actual OP questions. I have both HKS and Safariland. I have used HKS longer, so that is what I have more of, but like both systems. I will say HKS seems a little easier to prep than the Safarilands.

David E
October 5, 2011, 02:03 AM
I can only assume folks are delibrately misunderstanding RX-178's technique. I am tired as hell, and I understood exactly what he said the first time.

I thought I did, too. It turns out my misconception was better than his actual technique. Who knew?


It is not a terrible idea

If your goal is to get your revolver loaded back up to full capacity in the middle of a gunfight in the shortest possible time, it IS a terrible idea.

First if all, you may think you only fired twice, but actually fired 4-5

Second of all, if it's your priority to keep all unfired rounds "in case you might need them later," (instead of making the gun ready to shoot again NOW in the current situation you have) it's quicker to eject all the chambers, catching both spent and unspent carriages, pocketing it all, then do a normal speedloader reload.

Third, if this is really a technique you want to pursue, then do it right: either wear a 6 cartridge loop holder snapped on your belt, or discover Quick Strips, in addition to a speedloader.

MCgunner
October 5, 2011, 08:27 PM
Actually, I prefer a 10 round mec-gar magazine.

But, I had a Safariland Comp 1 for my M85. It lasted less than a year and screwed up. I've owned HKSs for my Taurus for since 1996 and I've had 'em for my K frames in six shot for a lot longer than that and never had one fail. They're tougher for carry and that counts with me. I couldn't get the rounds out of that Safariland that screwed up without cutting it up. That would have been a problem had I really needed it.

motorcycle-charlie
October 5, 2011, 09:14 PM
i tried the Safariland for my SP101 and it was ok, but i really perfer the HKS alot better. they just work better mechanicallyfor me, although in reality i carry my j frame 98% of the time and no speedloader works with the stock grips very well so i have become acceptable with speed strips. they carry much nicer. i hold my first reload in the 5th pocket in my Levi's.

jojo200517
October 5, 2011, 09:16 PM
To get back on topic of the original question, I like the safariland for the quicker and easier to me release method. The HKS does feel a little more durable but if I needed it reloaded faster I'd rather have the safariland. I feel like I need a 3rd hand to release the HKS ones.

Don't have a revolver cut for moon clips, but they do seem like they could get bent in ya pocket or something from the .45acp ones I handled.

I don't have any of those rubber strips or belt loop thingies, but I have been known to use SKS stripper clips a few times. :what: 10rds or .38/.357 lays relatively flat in your pocket.

That being said everyone has their own methods of doing it, I'd think I'd shoot 6 times then reload from empty. I'm not sure i'd worry tho if I did drop 1 live round trying to reload it faster. Every situation is different tho, if I was to the point of reloading i'd highly consider putting my tail in high gear in get the heck outta here mode.

Ok, so a cop that either pre-dated speedloaders or was too lazy to learn how to work them is the impetus for this absurd technique?? It's an outdated technique that has long since been eclipsed by technology. If that same cop told you that rotary phones, 8-tracks and black and white tv's were all the technology you really need, would you still follow his sage advice?

To be honest here now, the revolvers we are speaking of are pretty much outdated technology and have long since been eclipsed by semi automatic weapons. :neener: (I kid I kid)

Some people are still following the sage advice of using revolvers and pump shotguns and lever action rifles, when plenty of reliable new tech ways are around. They do it because its what they like and it works for them.

Red Cent
October 6, 2011, 10:35 AM
I may have missed this but the HKS simply keeps the rounds from dropping and has a bunch of movement in almost any direction. The Safariland Comps lock the rounds in a fixed position. I started PCCA with HKS but between the wobble, the acquisition of the reloader was difficult.
When carrying a revolver concealed, it should make little difference if you carry HKS or a Safariland Comp III speaking to the footprint of the speedloaders.
I am aware that other speedloaders wobble or lock but I am not advocating either. However, the Safariland Comp III works well for me.

David E
October 6, 2011, 10:36 AM
Some people are still following the sage advice of using revolvers and pump shotguns and lever action rifles, when plenty of reliable new tech ways are around. They do it because its what they like and it works for them.

There is nothing wrong with selecting a revolver, etc for defense, but it's the wise man that learns and practices proper techniques to get the most out of their chosen system.

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