Picked up a new one today, W/ unexpected problem...


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BigShep85
October 6, 2011, 09:10 AM
I went to pick up a new one today from a private seller. I was told it was like new but for the price i had my doubts, and of course I was being mislead:scrutiny:....it was nicer than any new from the factory revolver I have ever seen. It is an early 1990's S&W 629-5 pre-lock never been shot, never been dry fired, cylinder has never been turned for 15 years the original owner who bought it new had never had this gun out of his house. It doesnt even have a turn ring on the cylinder, there is not one stray mark anywhere and I was utterly amazed at first the self control of this guy..200 rounds of ammo came with the sale and all of it new in the box and he had never been tempted to fire the first round and second at just the beauty of it there is not one scuff one scratch nothing. The only time he had ever had it out was to wipe it down with flitz, and the finish was a bright mirror. It had all the original paperwork and box to accompany it.
NOW... I am a person who likes to use his guns to shoot and carry, this is part of the fun for me but I can not even bring my self to even fathom shooting this gun. I hate the thoughts of letting someone hold the gun afraid they will pull the hammer back and start a turn ring (the cylinder is as flawless and glass smooth as any other part of the gun). I would like to get some opinions on this. Does anybody elso do this? obviously I do now:rolleyes: but I would have never dreamed of it before. This is the first time I have ever had this problem:banghead:
What have I done to myself?

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Stainz
October 6, 2011, 09:18 AM
It's condition - for it's age - is rare - not the gun. As the Cajun 'gator hunting brother would say,

"Chooot eet... chooot eet!"

Stainz

MMCSRET
October 6, 2011, 09:23 AM
I have a Colt LWE Commander in my safe that I got for a good price complete with box and all, I treat it the same way you do. I picked up a S&W Highway Patrolman (Model 28) dated 1958 a couple years ago. It had never been fired, I couldn't bring myself to fire it so it went to market and I doubled my money and bought a Colt I felt free to use. Last month I came across a S&W Model 624, box and all, dated to 1985, couldn't find it in Blue Book, they don't list 3" RB, TS. They list SB 4 & 6". I thought Lew Horton, sure enough, Lew Horton confirmed that it was a special production run for them in 1985.
Yeah, I understand your situation, I've got a couple of other Colts that I treat the same way. It's part of our community affliction!!!!!!!!!!

Bullet Bob
October 6, 2011, 09:47 AM
If it's been polished enough to look almost like nickle, it's no longer original condition to a collector. Go ahead and shoot one of the finest .44 magnums ever made.

motorcycle-charlie
October 6, 2011, 09:49 AM
i would shoot it, consider it a good investment, and just keep it clean and lookin nice.

mooner
October 6, 2011, 09:53 AM
I cannot imagine having a nice gun like that and not shooting it. Wouldn't early 90's be a 629-4???

CraigC
October 6, 2011, 10:38 AM
Good Lord, it's not a NIB 1st generation Colt SAA. Take it out and shoot it! As stated, its condition is rare but not the gun. Very few things made in the last 50yrs are sacred. Life is short, enjoy your new S&W. I bought a brand new in the box 24-3 about two years ago. Paid a pretty penny but was tired of waiting for a deal. It had languished in its box for nearly 30yrs. First thing I did was swap the grips, take it out and shoot it.

http://photos.imageevent.com/newfrontier45/sixgunsiii/large/IMG_8747b.jpg

Waywatcher
October 6, 2011, 11:04 AM
If it's been polished enough to look almost like nickle, it's no longer original condition to a collector. Go ahead and shoot one of the finest .44 magnums ever made.

+1

If it's been flitz'd, it's not a collector anymore.

Not trying to burst bubbles, but flitz can also erase cylinder turn lines, carbon rings on cylinders, and other various marks...

Guillermo
October 6, 2011, 11:08 AM
I would not hesitate on my way to the range.

It's not a 3 inch python NIB.

It is a no-longer-new-condition (due to the polishing) 44 from the Clinton years.

CraigC
October 6, 2011, 11:20 AM
Not trying to burst bubbles, but flitz can also erase cylinder turn lines, carbon rings on cylinders, and other various marks...
Well, that's certainly true. It really depends on the model. If it's a standard bull barrel 629, it probably has been polished. However, the stainless Classics and DX models came from the factory with a bright finish.

Bullet Bob
October 6, 2011, 02:46 PM
Some S&W stainless guns were polished more than others depending on the years made, but the only one I remember (always chancy, I admit :o) being brightly polished were the edition called "MagnaClassic".

http://fototime.com/94EB4A45EA3EDD1/standard.jpg

CraigC
October 6, 2011, 03:14 PM
Wonderful! Those Magna Classics and the DX models are some of the best S&W ever produced.

cal01
October 6, 2011, 05:03 PM
Lucky find! I, too, would shoot it. To me, a beautiful old revolver that shows evidence of years of careful use and loving care is prettier than a safe queen that rarely sees the light of day. There are exceptions, but most guns were built to shoot and I like to let them fulfill their promise!

Cal in TX

Friendly, Don't Fire!
October 6, 2011, 06:27 PM
Some people have lots of money and they have a large warehouse full of vintage cars. Some have lots of guns that are still like new.

I have neither, however, I can say that every gun I have ever purchased I took out and shot, then shot again, then more, then more, to the point where the gun still looks good, however it doesn't look like it just came out of the OEM box from the factory. You know?---I wouldn't even care for something that is functional yet I decide to keep it as a display item.

If I want to see display items, I will go to a museum, as for that gun, I would be the guy making the first BEAUTY-marks on it!:eek::confused::rolleyes::scrutiny::D

gearhead
October 6, 2011, 08:31 PM
If you had bought it new from a dealer in the early '90s, would you have kept it NIB or would you have fired it?

I thought so. Now go enjoy it.

T Bran
October 6, 2011, 08:46 PM
Sell it to me ill gently fire a few and sell it back to you ( some restrictions apply offer not available in all states my definition of a few and yours may vary ) .
SHOOT IT and ENJOY
T

Beat Trash
October 6, 2011, 09:08 PM
You have 200 rds of ammunition daring you to go to the range.

JEB
October 6, 2011, 11:39 PM
but if you dont pull that hammer back, you'll never know just how sweet that SA trigger really is....


tempting ain't it?.......


personally, i would shoot it........a LOT!

franco45
October 7, 2011, 12:53 AM
It's a gun!! Shoot it.

montanaoffroader
October 7, 2011, 01:13 AM
Shoot it, you KNOW you want to! :evil:

BigShep85
October 7, 2011, 09:05 AM
It is driving me crazy just having the gun and the ammo together. I dont know how the man made it 15 years withou firing a shot, I have made it one day and the temptation is insane. I have some pics I took last night, maybe this weekend I can get outside and take some better pictures.

BigShep85
October 7, 2011, 09:08 AM
.......

motorcycle-charlie
October 7, 2011, 10:01 AM
NICE LOOKIN MACHINE YOU GOT THERE! looks clean....maybee a little too clean..it might be time to dirty it up a bit.

CajunBass
October 7, 2011, 10:07 AM
I don't have a gun I WON'T shoot.

I do have guns I DON'T shoot.

Only you can make the decision.

CraigC
October 7, 2011, 10:17 AM
Definitely not a factory polish. Just looks like somebody got carried away with the Flitz. Definitely no reason NOT to shoot it either. ;)

Old Fuff
October 7, 2011, 10:51 AM
Two questions:

Why did you buy it?

How much did you pay?

If it is in the original box, and the finish hasn't been rubbed out, you might be able to sell it for a (substantial?) profit to someone who wants a safe queen and is willing to pay big bucks to get it. In this case you can spend part of the money to get a less-then perfect example to use as a shooter, while putting the difference in your pocket.

On the other hand, if that idea won't work for you, go ahead and shoot it.

I have done both, and in the first instance used the profit to buy additional guns. One thing I never do is listen to those who say, "Shoot it!! Shoot it" when they have none of their money involved. Personally I have never had any trouble making up my own mind, and therefore go in what ever direction my best interests lie.

BigShep85
October 7, 2011, 11:04 AM
I just hate to be the one to do the shooting after years of being kept perfect, but believe it or not there is no way I will be able to pick up a used 629 for what I have in this one especially a pre-lock...I do believe I agree with old fuff and it should go on the market someday when I am ready to let her go (it is awful pretty to look at though:rolleyes:), that way my conscience is clean when I shoot a used one and let somebody else continue the tradition of keeping this one original and unfired.

Regardless has anybody else here kept one unfired for that long or intend to?

MMCSRET
October 7, 2011, 11:07 AM
Old Fuff has his finger on it. I stated earlier a few that I have and haven't fired. I forgot the one I've had longest, new and never fired. Interarms Mark X 30-06, the top of the line with the nicest finish and the fully adjustable trigger. Bought it as a barreled action in 1989, in 1995 or so I got a set of Millet base and rings installed, it has a Bell & Carlson stock in the corner, I've just never put it all together, 22 going on 23 years and haven't put it all together yet. Does it bother me, no, if it did it wouldn't be unfired today.

Old Fuff
October 7, 2011, 11:18 AM
Regardless has anybody else here kept one unfired for that long or intend to?

Sure, a couple for over a half century. :what:

Why?

1. Because neither would make particularly good shooters, and I have similar guns that are.

2. The collector value continues to go up (and I love collectors with deep pockets :evil:). Any time I choose they can go onto the market, and the money used for something else. It sure beats putting the cash into a bank saving account at today's interest rates.

The trouble with the "ya' got'ta shoot everything" guys is that never learned how to make, as well as spend money. ;)

BigShep85
October 7, 2011, 12:56 PM
I was beginning to think I was the only one who felt that way about the collectors thing. I dont really have any reason to shoot it especially with the price of ammo these days. I have plenty of other guns to carry and plenty to shoot, so why do that to this gun that has been kept for 15 years unused already? It has been stated that the condition is rare but not the gun so why wouldnt somebody want a great reliable popular example of an american classic that has never been touched to add to their collection? Its almost a piece of history being the last models before the lock, that was a turning point in firearm and S&W history. Makes me feel a little better lol.

Fishslayer
October 7, 2011, 01:38 PM
I just hate to be the one to do the shooting after years of being kept perfect.

I volunteer to do the dirty deed. :D


Regardless has anybody else here kept one unfired for that long or intend to?

Never.

CraigC
October 7, 2011, 01:42 PM
It's been polished after the fact so there is no collector value. It may have even been fired a bunch and then polished to look new. I reckon I fail to see why it should be held sacred.

PONTIACDM
October 7, 2011, 02:00 PM
I have a couple I would never shoot. One of them being the first rifle I ever purchased. It's just a Marlin 30/30, nothing special. It's been 14 years so why shoot it now? To me collecting is just as fun as shooting them. If you enjoy it as is, then don't shoot it. If you would enjoy it more by shooting it, then shoot it.

Old Fuff
October 7, 2011, 07:56 PM
There are "true, blue-blooded S&W collectors," and then there are "plain ol' collectors." The former are often not interested in post-World War Two revolvers, while the latter aren't so fussy. They will likely give the pre-2000 post-war guns some consideration, and are much more likely to take them out and shoot them, unless they are absolutely like brand new.

The Old Fuff often observes that the better hand ejector revolvers, both pre and post war, do not seem to be dropping in value. I also noticed that the .44 Magnum in question has the always-more-popular 4" barrel.

I won't take the liberty of telling BigShep85 what he should or shouldn't do, but I'd bet good money that if or when he decides to part with it he won't have trouble finding a buyer that is willing to give him more then he paid for it. :cool:

Drako
October 7, 2011, 08:44 PM
Lord i hope you havent shot that it take a strong willed person not to shoot a perfect gun and a un shot one is rare! so remember as soon as you squeeze that triiger go ahead and take a 100 to 150 offf that value! i would sell it pocket the extra and buy a nice shooter!

LeonCarr
October 7, 2011, 08:54 PM
Shoot it. Safe Queens are for Sissies.

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

Krogen
October 8, 2011, 03:37 PM
Awww... Go shoot it and have some fun! It would be like not letting your Lab go for a swim just so he didn't get dirty. Ever see the grin on the face of a dirty wet Lab?

Back in the day, I bought a couple brand-new S&W Model 24-3's. Sure, I knew they were limited production. Sure, I could have kept them pristine for somebody else to shoot when they bought them from my estate. But I didn't wait any longer than it took to handload some ammo. I grinned from ear-to-ear. Those guns have been making me grin for 25+ years, now.

Oxide
October 8, 2011, 05:12 PM
I bought a NIB S&W 29-2 back in March. It was 100%. I have shot it maybe 40 times, with friends and family, and it is now 98% or so, with one little nick and a turn ring on the cylinder, since then.

Shoot the thing. Take it there in a nice foam case, shoot it carefully, then put it back. While no gun can be kept perfect and shot, they can be kept extremely nice and shot. Shooting them isn't the problem, it's the banging around to and from that will get them.

Carbonator
October 8, 2011, 06:09 PM
When you are 100 years old looking back on life, will you have rather shot the gun, or left it unfired for someone else to shoot?

""Life's odyssey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out,shouting,"...holy %*&!...what a ride!" -unknown

sidheshooter
October 8, 2011, 06:22 PM
More experienced people than I have already chimed in. All I can offer is a story: A couple of years ago, this 2" S&W model 12 showed up at my LGS, sans turn ring. I bought it, for a bit more than I would normally think of paying for a K-frame .38. People at the range sometimes comment on the condition, which certainly remains very very good, but unturned it ain't, not any more!

Onward Allusion
October 8, 2011, 06:32 PM
For me, guns are meant to be shot and cars are meant to be driven. No sense in buying either and keeping it in a display case, garage, or safe.

Old Shooter
October 8, 2011, 06:35 PM
Sure, I could have kept them pristine for somebody else to shoot when they bought them from my estate.

^^^ This.

When that trigger is pulled and it's touched off for the first time some years in the future you may find it difficult to turn over in that wooden box six feet underground. :)

My vote is shoot it and enjoy it.

The Lone Haranguer
October 8, 2011, 07:15 PM
Put it to work! It isn't such a collectible that a mere turn ring from normal use will destroy its value.

olafhardtB
October 9, 2011, 09:21 AM
I once had a brand new pickup truck. A guy backed into it and dented a fender. I still remember the relief I felt, I could now just have a truck and I did for 16 years and 300,000 miles. I feel that collectors remove so many wonderful things from circulation just for the pride of ownership. If you can't bring your self to shoot it that's your decision.

tallpaul
October 9, 2011, 10:07 AM
With that logic I hope your wife or girl friends were not or are not virgins.... That would be a liven he'll for sure...

Do you buy your underwear used too, ya know not to clean and never used?

texagun
October 9, 2011, 11:00 AM
You know the factory fires these guns before they leave the factory..........right?

And it has obviously been polished (most likely with Flitz) after leaving the factory.

There is no reason not to shoot it and enjoy it.

stevekozak
October 9, 2011, 12:19 PM
Shoot the damn thing!! The only value in an unshot gun to me is knowing what I fire through it is all that it has had fired through it. I would buy such a gun, but shoot it immediately. I agree with Onward Allusion guns are made to be fired and cars are made to be driven!!!

buck460XVR
October 9, 2011, 12:33 PM
The trouble with the "ya' got'ta shoot everything" guys is that never learned how to make, as well as spend money. ;)

That's like saying the trouble with the condescending know it all guys is they never learned how to proofread their posts before they hit the submit button. ;)

I'm sure there's plenty of folks that would shoot that gun, that make more money than all of us combined. The decision to shoot or not to shoot is purely subjective....especially on a gun that has been refinished and is not extremely rare or old. It has nothing to do with one's financial abilities. It has to do with one's priorities. Just because one's priorities differ from yours does not makes his priorities wrong.....it just makes them different. Why the need to belittle?

savit260
October 9, 2011, 01:44 PM
It's been polished after the fact so there is no collector value. It may have even been fired a bunch and then polished to look new. I reckon I fail to see why it should be held sacred.


This ^^^

The gun is no longer a collectors item after the flitz polish job.

There's no way to know if it's been fired or not at this point. Easy enough to polish out carbon rings and turn rings with Flitz.


It's a nice gun... go shoot it.. you won't devalue it any more than the Flitz job already has, provided you don't stuff a double charge in it or something.

MMCSRET
October 9, 2011, 02:18 PM
Another entry: Have been offered a Browning B-92 Centennial, NIB, 6000 produced in 1978. Priced right, 33 years old and never fired, the lever has never been cycled, the saddle ring still has the plastic sheath on it. I could double my money in short order. I like them better than the Rossi or the 1894 Marlin or the '94 Winchester. Shoot it????????

Remllez
October 9, 2011, 02:24 PM
Since YOU have not owned the gun since it was NEW it would be unethical to sell it as unfired. It sounds like it is in high condition but certainly not unfired! It has been polished so it's not an original factory finish.

Those two facts alone devalue the gun as a true collectable. I'm not sure why you bought the gun, but if you don't want to shoot it, sell it and buy a gun you will be comfortable shooting.

Krogen
October 9, 2011, 02:26 PM
I guess one of the reasons I like guns is that they have aesthetic value >and< can be used. Quite unlike a painting that might have aesthetic value but can only be viewed and certainly not "used."

I have the opposite frustration from OP's. Grandpa's old Iver Johnson 38 S&W breaktop sits in my safe unfired by me. It wasn't well-built to begin with - it's pretty loose now. Likely it was wasn't terribly safe even with the black powder loads of the day. Yet, I'm itching to fire it. It bugs me that I "believe" I can't do it safely. To me, guns are to be fired and this one is the only one I haven't shot. I'm thinking of trying some primer-powered wax bullets in it just so I can "fire" it.

CraigC
October 9, 2011, 02:49 PM
Another entry: Have been offered a Browning B-92 Centennial, NIB, 6000 produced in 1978. Priced right, 33 years old and never fired, the lever has never been cycled, the saddle ring still has the plastic sheath on it. I could double my money in short order. I like them better than the Rossi or the 1894 Marlin or the '94 Winchester. Shoot it????????
Shoot it!!!

Maybe I just try not to overthink it, which is a feat for me. It is a gun. I has an intended purpose. If the price is reasonable to me and it will do what I want it to do or has a certain appeal, why should I care what a collector thinks it's worth? Present or future???

I bought a NIB Winchester 94 NRA Centennial Rifle for less than the cost of a new one. It languished in its original box for almost 30yrs. It's one of my favorite hunting rifles.

I bought a NIB Browning 53 that languished in its original box for about ten years. It's a wonderfully accurate shooter and small game popper. It looks pretty good too!

Other limited production guns that are often found NIB that I would love to have, shoot and hunt with include:
S&W's Elmer Keith commemorative .44Mag model 29
Winchester's Chief Crazy Horse 94 .38-55
Winchester Theodore Roosevelt Commemorative 1894 .30-30, in both lengths
Winchester Buffalo Bill commemorative 1894 .30-30
Winchester John Wayne commemorative 1894 .32-40
Winchester Canadian Centennial 1894 .30-30
Browning 1886 rifle (not the carbine)
Browning 65 .218Bee
Colt 125th anniversary SAA
Colt Alaskan Pipeline SAA
A 4" S&W 24-3 to match my 6˝" above

I could not imagine denying myself the pleasure of owning, shooting and hunting with those guns because a collector thinks they should stay pristine. To put it another way, why would you let a stranger dictate how you use your own property??? I'm not saying that my purposes are any more or less noble. I'm just saying that either is equally viable.

Old Fuff
October 9, 2011, 03:48 PM
Another entry: Have been offered a Browning B-92 Centennial, NIB, 6000 produced in 1978. Priced right, 33 years old and never fired, the lever has never been cycled, the saddle ring still has the plastic sheath on it. I could double my money in short order. I like them better than the Rossi or the 1894 Marlin or the '94 Winchester. Shoot it????????

Personally I think that this business of "YOU HAVE TO SHOOT IT!! GUNS WERE MADE TO BE SHOT!! is a bunch of hooey. The rifle in question was made to be a collectable, and I absolutely love collectors that have deep pockets and spend money accordingly. :evil:

If you can actually double your money (which is something I have done, and then some), why not do it and then use part of the money to buy an acceptable-but-ordinary B-92 to use as a shooter? I have always regarded collectables that continue to increase in value (some of course don't) to be excellent investment and trading stock when something I want more comes along.

Frankly, I wouldn't hesitate to shoot most of the guns on CraigC's list, because I don't see them to be anything more then "manufactured commemorative" level collectables, but I wouldn't consider that to be the case with the Browning, which offers more then fancy cosmetics.

I much prefer to enjoy shooting on one hand, while I can make money on the other. Now do whichever you choose. ;)

harmon rabb
October 9, 2011, 04:04 PM
With that logic I hope your wife or girl friends were not or are not virgins.... That would be a liven he'll for sure...

Do you buy your underwear used too, ya know not to clean and never used?
lmao. nice analogy on the women :D

TYFOOON
October 9, 2011, 04:06 PM
Wow!

What a beauty!!!

Reminds me of one I have in my safe. It was my granddad's and my grandmother gave it to me the day we buried him. He shot it some but I don't shoot it. I carry it from time to time but never pulled the trigger. It just feels right to keep it as is. I have lots of guns to play with so I like to just have it.

19-4 S&W .357 Magnum

Fooon
http://i55.tinypic.com/244dsvm.jpg
http://i52.tinypic.com/fdy13n.jpg

Guillermo
October 9, 2011, 04:09 PM
Old Fuff is, of course, right.

Shooting stuff just because it has a bang switch is silly.

Some should be preserved, some should be considered investments.

Of course I don't own any of those.

Closest I have is a 100% Python but since I do not plan on selling it...

CraigC
October 9, 2011, 04:21 PM
It's a decision you have to make for yourself. You have to weigh the collector premium against the value you place on it for your own needs. Such as the above-referenced 24-3. It was still less than a new "Classic" and I had no reservations about throwing away the $200-$300 that it lost when I shot it. Which is what happens with any new gun. What difference does it make how old it is? None, to me. On the other end, there is the NIB 3rd Model Hand Ejector Target that a guy inherited from his father in law. This is a little different because you have a true collectible. A very rare S&W, rarer than most Triple-Locks, that is worth several thousand dollars. In this case, it might make more sense to sell it at a profit, to fund a suitable replacement. Personally, I would've gotten top dollar from a collector and funded several more .44Spl's that I could enjoy. Without fear of losing $2000 from holster wear or $5000 if I dropped it on the ground.


I wouldn't hesitate to shoot most of the guns on CraigC's list
The point is that many would 'perceive' it as foolish to shoot any of those guns, strictly because they 'think' they're collectible and that they gain some level of sacredness because they've been kept NIB for a period of time. In reality, they're not collectibles. At least not the kind that will appreciate to any respectable degree during one's lifetime. I'm just trying to urge folks to punch through the fog of their perception and look at them more objectively. What they really offer are fancy finishes, uncommon configurations, barrel lengths, barrel profiles and chamberings. Folks shouldn't be afraid to enjoy them for those characteristics because others 'think' they're collectible.

Guillermo
October 9, 2011, 07:36 PM
we can all agree that there is some level of rareness that makes a gun unshootable.

say a Remington Model 53

the other reason is investment...if there has to be the potential for profit.

of course each of us get to make the decision as to how rare or how much potential profit there is to make it unshootable.

as to the OP, for me, it falls into neither category

CSA 357
October 9, 2011, 07:45 PM
If your not gona shoot it you just as well take a picture and hang it on the wall and sell the gun! all my guns are shooters, if i cant shoot it why even have it?i have a very nice 629 no dash pinned and recesed its gets shot i take care of it but it has had manny lbs of home cast bullets down the barrel.had a colt saa i shot it too, even carred it in a holster, a little wear on a nice gun is ok. now go shoot that smith! lol

Remllez
October 9, 2011, 09:26 PM
I'll explain it this way, you've worked overtime, scrimped and sacrificed to obtain the most collectable unfired pristine gun that you've always wanted. It's been carefully oiled and admired on a regular basis.

You've repeatedly defended why you don't shoot it and that it's going to be worth 50% more than the same gun that's been fired some day. Then one day you hop in your car to go for an ice cream and screech boom!!! Your hit by a car and killed instantly:(

Your wife that's always hated those dam* guns and your kids that could give a crap about your collection let alone the time and sacrifice you've put into your hobby sell those guns to pay for your funeral or take a nice trip to remember good ole pops.

And your setting there with St. Peter saying "you know if I had to do it all over again I would have shot them guns and had some real fun with them, instead of deluding myself into thinking they'd be worth something to anyone but me some day".

I'm not trying to be a smart a** here or start an argument just giving food for thought.

Old Fuff
October 9, 2011, 11:19 PM
Ah, but again you miss the point. Nowhere is it written that you have to sit on everything until St. Peter calls. On occasion I have doubled my money in 48 hours. I have a friend who's record is 15 minutes :eek:. Sixty days in not unheard of. It boils down to what you have to pay to get (whatever) and how much you can get by turning it - now or later.

Put simply - again - I would much rather sell a collectable to a collector, and take him to the cleaners :evil:, then go out and shoot it, and thereby reduce it's value to that of a shooter. Why do that when I can take the $$$ I made from the collector, and use only a part of it to buy a similar or better shooter? The opportunity doesn't happen very often, but it does happen if you know what you are doing. I don't believe that ignorence is bliss...

It depends on what you go out and buy, but in my view anybody that shoots anything they get regardless of what it is, simply doesn't have the knowledge that's necessary to do better.

MMCSRET
October 10, 2011, 12:27 AM
Old Fuff has it, same as I do. I own a number of new and used guns that I have never fired. The Browning B-92 I mentioned earlier, I think I'll probably pick it up tomorrow, I'm not going to shoot it, I'll show it off for a while and then let it out that it might go away for the right price. For a limited edition that is highly desirable thats all it takes. Inducing envy in other people that presumably have deep pockets is fun, more fun than shooting that Browning. I would loose 300$ by firing it once. Not a good exchange in my mind. Owning, buying, selling and trading guns is fun, and sometimes profitable.

Guillermo
October 10, 2011, 12:40 AM
The Fuffster is usually right.

He tends to only want to shoot his gun with Speer plastic target rounds and doesn't mind if any gun is rendered DAO, including 3 inch Pythons.

But on matters like this, he is spot-on

Iramo94
October 10, 2011, 01:06 AM
If you look very, very closely at the first picture, you can see that there is a tiny, faint, shiny line where the ring normally is. Now, that may have just been the test shots at the factory, but it doesn't matter. The gun is imperfect, so just shoot the darn thing already.

Old Fuff
October 10, 2011, 09:48 AM
Owning, buying, selling and trading guns is fun, and sometimes profitable.

Indeed! And when it's profitable it provides funds to buy more guns that otherwise might not have been bought. Where is it written that you can't work both sides of the street?

He tends to only want to shoot his gun with Speer plastic target rounds and doesn't mind if any gun is rendered DAO, including 3 inch Pythons.

The Old Fuff's problem is that he has a bunch of neat, but old stuff (like himself :D) and he's careful about how he treats it because getting parts to repair something may be hard and costly. Also he seldom finds himself in a potential situation where any sort of extra power is called for. In smaller revolvers his idea of a Plus-P .38 Special or .357 Magnum is called a .44 Special.

Ever since I met Bill Jorden and discovered that his favorite 4" Model 19 didn't have a hammer spur I've been of the opinion that hammer spurs should go. But I need guns to practice on, and I understand that Guillermo has a bunch of them. The only time I ever got into a problem was when I was part of a plot to de-spur an engraved, .44 Special, Colt Single Action Army - that didn't belong to me. :uhoh:

But that another story. :evil: :D

Remllez
October 10, 2011, 10:19 AM
Lol Fuff,

I think it's you that misses the point....St Peter can and does call anytime he wants, I never said you have to hold onto any "collector gun" for years in my post. In fact your name may very well come up on the way home from buying the next gun you plan to exploit some "deep pocket" shlub with!

Put simply these unfired pristine investment grade guns you use to "take people to the cleaners with" matter only to you and the shlub you are sticking. And being greedy has never felt right to me so I leave that to people like you and never waste my time or money buying a gun I'll never shoot or enjoy for the purpose it was made for.

And like I said I wasn't trying to start any arguments with my post but you seem to take exception to anybody that doesnt agree with everything you say. So no doubt you will have a witty reply to what I've said and by all means please feel free to share that with us all.

thefamcnaj
October 10, 2011, 10:27 AM
If you plan on keeping the gun for ever than shoot it. It doesn't matter if the value goes down if you shoot it, because it will always be yours. If you hope some day to flip it and make some money then I would just keep it polished up and put away.

Guillermo
October 10, 2011, 11:12 AM
And being greedy has never felt right to me so I leave that to people like you

Buying a gun and selling it at a profit is greedy?

Wow, you could be an Obama cabinet member.

As long as the gun was not used to threaten the buyer, I assume that they want to buy the gun. We mutually agree to a price and goods and money changes hands. Called "free trade."



As far as the "Fuffster" and witty replies...that would be a first :neener:

Just keep him and his bench grinder away from my Diamondbacks!!! :what:

Remllez
October 10, 2011, 12:01 PM
Guillermo,

Read post 61....you do see the words "take him to the cleaners". Maybe greed and free trade can be defined differently by you, but to me those 5 words are the textbook definition of greed. LOL on the political attack by the way....when all else fails use politics to deflect the facts.

Guillermo
October 10, 2011, 12:11 PM
to deflect the facts

If the buyer willingly purchases the gun there is no reason for guilt.
(unless one does not believe in free trade)

That is the salient fact...period.

No deflection.

As to your definition of "greed"...communication is impossible if we all have our own definitions for common words.

greed [griːd]
n
1. excessive consumption of or desire for food; gluttony
2. excessive desire, as for wealth or power

CraigC
October 10, 2011, 12:21 PM
There is nothing wrong or immoral about getting top dollar from someone who knows EXACTLY what he is paying for. Period.

Guillermo
October 10, 2011, 12:29 PM
There is nothing wrong or immoral about getting top dollar from someone who knows EXACTLY what he is paying for. Period.

Craig,

You always say things with accuracy and brevity.

The exact opposite of my verbose manner. And, of course, like on this thread I offer many opportunities for deflection and tangents. Your way is better.


(tipping my hat)

:D

BigShep85
October 10, 2011, 01:12 PM
I, like some others here, enjoy just as much if not more the art of buying and selling guns. I enjoy placing rare or hard to find guns in the hands of collectors who enjoy the guns. Kind of like a charity, some people look for certain guns for years, say like some of the guns mentioned above or a mint condition never fired 629-5 for whatever reason (maybe because it was one of the last before the lock, or maybe they had one as a child or something). I enjoy helping people find guns they have been searching for whatever the reason, I have been searching for a reasonably priced ruger vaquero birdshead 45 lc in stainless steel for over a year now with no luck, I have found some which are outrageously priced which I am not willing to pay that price for but others are, more power to them, if they got the money and want it that bad so be it....but I am not. It is an art, a game, a hobby, it is just as enjoyable as shooting for some. I think this is an overlooked aspect of guns that some dont neccessarily understand and is sometimes overlooked.

CraigC
October 10, 2011, 01:22 PM
You always say things with accuracy and brevity.
That's just a nice way of saying that I usually piss people off. ;)

Remllez
October 10, 2011, 01:37 PM
Lol the only "salient fact" is the statement made (take him to the cleaners) followed by an odd emoticon veiling the fact that he likes to do that to deep pocketed collectors.

So yes we can agree on your definition of greed...number two pretty much covers it right!
I never said selling a collectable for top dollar was wrong. That's an assumption made by someone else. Selling for top dollar and "taking someone to the cleaners" are two very different things.

As far as communication goes there's always that "pesky comprehension thing". And as far as deflection goes you tried a classic, attack the other person with an irrelevant statement that has nothing to do with the facts set out before us. That you may want to look up as long as your in the dictionary.

I do owe an apology to the OP for letting me get pulled off track by someone of superior intellect and I recognize that I'm far out classed and morally inferior to some of the other posters so I will end my participation in this thread.

Like I originally posted I didn't want to start any argument just offered a different point of view that will never be absorbed by some.

MMCSRET
October 10, 2011, 02:45 PM
This thread had been fun; and is becoming funny. A so simple question looked at and answered/deflected in so many different ways!!!!!!!
Ain't semantics wundrfullllll??????????

Guillermo
October 10, 2011, 05:00 PM
this statement cannot be argued with


There is nothing wrong or immoral about getting top dollar from someone who knows EXACTLY what he is paying for. Period.

Guillermo
October 10, 2011, 05:01 PM
Ain't semantics wundrfullllll??????????

no one can say you are anti semantic

(I crack me up)

CraigC
October 10, 2011, 06:22 PM
Personally, I have zero problem taking a collector "to the cleaners" if he wants something I got. No deception, no coercion, no problem. I invite all to come hither and pay too much for anything I'm willing to part with. I'll get more.


I crack me up
You're on a roll!!!

MMCSRET
October 10, 2011, 07:00 PM
I had forgotten this one. About 1995 I won a Browning copy of a Winchester Model 12, 20 ga., modified choke, engraved and gold inlayed. It was an NRA limited production for Friends of NRA. Had the NRA seal on one side of the receiver and an upland hunting scene on the other, gold filigree on the muzzle and the trigger housing. Beautiful gun, I won it with a 20$ ticket. I sold it a month later for what I was offered; $850.00, some may think I done wrong, I think I simply fulfilled the buyers wishes. I had never even put it together, Model 12-take down you know. Still in the box, I have a picture of it somewhere.

Guillermo
October 10, 2011, 07:06 PM
I have zero problem taking a collector "to the cleaners" if he wants something I got it

that is because you believe in free trade.

Old Fuff
October 10, 2011, 07:25 PM
Some folks can't take a joke. ;)

It's a matter of fact that most collectors that have deep pockets are not dumb. If they were their pockets would be filled with air rather then $$$. Whatever they're collecting speciality is, they know it forward and backwards.

However if one comes up with a piece they need to fill a hole in the overall picture, they will as a last resort pay over market (sometimes way over market!) to get whatever. I consider them to be fair game because we both know the rules, and it's unlikely that either of us can hoodwink the other.

Now Guillermo is another matter. Knowing how Texacans feel about BBQ guns I made him a great offer... :uhoh:

I had this genuine Iver Johnson .32 top-break, (mostly) nickel plated with real mother-of-pearl stocks. I offered to swap it to him even-up, for my choice of just one piece in his Colt Diamondback collection...

So far he hasn't responded... :confused:

Guillermo
October 10, 2011, 07:47 PM
So far he hasn't responded...

Well as much as the Iver Johnson with the custom chrome leopard spots interests me...I just can't stand you Fitz-ing one of my Diamondbacks. :banghead:

Besides...I only have 5 :eek:

It has been over a month since I bought one and I am starting to feel a little nervous.

Is there a 5 step program for Colt addiction? :what:

Shienhausser
October 10, 2011, 08:51 PM
"Is there a 5 step program for Colt addiction? "


I'm not sure but since I can barely afford my Smith addiction I hope I don't get the Colt-fever anytime soon!

InkEd
October 10, 2011, 08:57 PM
Shoot the darn thing! It's a mass-produced domestic handgun.

Guillermo
October 10, 2011, 09:01 PM
I'm not sure but since I can barely afford my Smith addiction

I think that Smith and Wesson has parity with Colt in my house...so don't think you can't catch both.
:what:

My last Smith purchase was a K22 from the early 50's.

What a gun!!!

MMCSRET
October 10, 2011, 10:03 PM
I have more Colts than all others combined but my last purchase was a Lew Horton 624 no dash in box with all papers, etc. Colts grab me first but some Smiffs are also hard to get away from.

Old Fuff
October 11, 2011, 08:27 AM
Well as much as the Iver Johnson with the custom chrome leopard spots interests me...I just can't stand you Fitz-ing one of my Diamondbacks.

Not to worry… :uhoh:

If I can pick out a Diamondback in exchange for the (almost) pristine nickel plated Iver Johnson with pearl grips I promise I won’t FITZ it….

Just cut off the useless hammer spur and make it DAO. :D

bikerdoc
October 11, 2011, 09:00 AM
Im with fluff.

Buy it, flip it, or shoot it, whatever. I dont do safe queens.

I got an old ruger security six. 3 didget serial # that I got pristine and now carry and shoot one day week.

BigShep85
October 11, 2011, 10:30 AM
One of those is going to happen soon biker, I am just not sure which first. I am waiting to pick up a model 58 soon and if it makes it to that date in my posession she will go with me to the range to fire the 58 and It will probably see its first rounds ever....looking forward to that.

gearchecker
October 11, 2011, 01:57 PM
You went over to pick up a gun you intended to shoot, right?
Unless you paid a huge premium for a NIB Model 29-5, it was probably priced as a shooter.
I have a 29-5 that's only had 12 shots thru it. I bought it that way and just never found a good reason to shoot it. I keep thinking about selling it but I haven't gotten around to it.

I've had 3 S&W's that had never been loaded or fired before I bought them. Now I only have 1 (A model 60 no dash).
The other 2 were a Model 19-3 snubby and a Model 19-4 snubby. The 19-3 I fired within a couple weeks after getting it. The 19-4 I couldn't bring myself to pull the trigger because it was in the same condition as your 29-5.
I took a friend with me to the range, loaded it up, and put it in her friends hands to shoot it. After she took the first two shots it was used, so I got it back and we shot the rest of the box of ammo thru it. I have no regrets. These beauties are made to shoot.

If you can't bring yourself to shoot it, find a friend you trust, take them to the range and do as I did. Let somebody else take the first couple shots so you won't feel the pain. Then it's a used gun.

If you can't shoot it under any circumstance, you'll either have a sweet safe queen or you can sell it, probably for a handsome profit. A mint 29-5 with the box and all the acessories can sell for more than $1500 these days. Then you could buy a gun or two that you'll shoot without remorse.

I understand it's a tough choice. Being a gun collector is much harder than having a great gun collection.
If you have the money to spare buy another one and store the sweetheart 29-5

Regards,
Gearchecker

BigShep85
October 11, 2011, 02:46 PM
Like I said before I enjoy collecting and "placing" the guns in good homes. It doesnt hurt my feelings at all to keep a good gun. The seller was actually only selling locally he would not ship and he had it priced reasonably so I went and picked it up. Because first I did not have a 44 mag and wanted one but also because I dont mind to go through the trouble of shipping a gun to people who want the gun more than I do when I have had my fun with it and get ready to part with it (if that ever happens). I have bought some guns for this reason and get the same sense of joy every time I open the safe as I had the first time I saw it. Needless to say I have no intention of parting with those guns I guess that is how people become collectors:rolleyes:.

Tony_the_tiger
October 11, 2011, 04:01 PM
I agree this is a HUGE problem. Send it my way and i'll take care of it for you.

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