Getting into rifle reloading - Need equipment advice


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WardenWolf
October 13, 2011, 12:40 AM
I'm looking into getting into rifle reloading in order to save money. I'm primarily looking to reload for these calibers:

7.62x54R (I have PRVI brass)
7.7 JAP
8mm Mauser
And, to a lesser extent, .223.

Since the "For the new reloader" post is now nearly 5 years old, what would you recommend as far as equipment?

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Hondo 60
October 13, 2011, 12:49 AM
Looking to reload 7.62x54R to save money?
The surplus ammo is cheap enough that you won't save much, if any.
But you will have much better ammo, tailored to your rifle.

The press you want will depend on how much ammo you plan to shoot & how much money you have to spend.

Will a single stage be good enough?

I certainly wouldn't suggest a progressive for someone new.
There's just too many things going on at the same time.

A Lee Classic Turret press is a great starter.

I emphasize "Classic" because there are 2 Lee Turret presses.
The other one, called "Deluxe" is not deluxe at all.
The Classic is steel & cast iron (and has a MUCH better spent primer system).

I hope this gives you a start.

WardenWolf
October 13, 2011, 12:53 AM
I have a PSL. Shooting corrosive ammo through it results in a nightmarish cleaning job involving an hour of work and half a bottle of solvent. As a result, I refuse to shoot corrosive ammo through it anymore. It also can be hard to find ~150-grain commercial 7.62x54R (which the PSL needs), although PRVI and Wolf have finally stepped up to the plate.

chris in va
October 13, 2011, 12:56 AM
I'm probably not much help as I use a Hand Press for 30-06, x39, 223, 9mm and 45.

fpgt72
October 13, 2011, 08:59 AM
That is the same reason I reload the 7.62x54R...my PSL. You also seem to be into the "odd duck" military stuff like I am...but toss in there 30-40 Krag 6.5 carcano and a few others.

I have the Lee turret press and like it quite a bit. I just started loading last week and have only made about 50 or so rounds but it seems to do a good job. If you get their kit budget for a good scale and a good trimmer I was not happy with the ones in the kit.

trixter
October 13, 2011, 09:08 AM
I also agree,

A Lee Classic Turret press is a great starter.

As said above. You are going to do do a lot of 'by hand' preparation, and the above mentioned press will work very well. Progressives work great for pistol ammo, however rifle reloading is a different animal (some people do use progressives though).

WardenWolf
October 13, 2011, 05:50 PM
Are there any upgrades I should buy for the press at the same time? Also, what do you guys recommend for dies?

dnmccoy
October 13, 2011, 07:54 PM
I would get the Pro auto disk, but also get the double disk kit as it allows you to fine tune your powder drop

SASS#23149
October 13, 2011, 09:30 PM
the press needs to be extra sturdy,like the afore mentioned Lee,or a Rock Chucker.Sixing the brass on a lesser press just adds extra work.
dies? how deep are your pockets. for really good ammo,the Redding bench rest dies are excellent. for most of us,RCBS is the rule of thumb...affordable and will get the job done.
you'll NEED case lube.I avoid the sprays,and hand lube each case with Imperial.this gives me one more chance to look the cases over.

fpgt72
October 13, 2011, 10:05 PM
The double disk is going to be a must for the rifle cartridges. If you are not getting the kit look at the perfect powder measure....it will work with the turret press but you have to get a powder through die.

You have to remember that the lee stuff does it by volume not by weight....nothing wrong with that and I have found it to be very consistent with its drops...you just have to fine tune it.

Other then the few things I talked about in the above post a caliper is a must...I got mine from harbor freight and it works pretty good. You will also need a bullet puller and good loading manual or two...or whoever made the powders website to read up on loading....I am old so I like a book.

After that it is just space and some quiet time to do the loading....take you time double check everything and you will have fun. Start out with a middle of the road loading and work from there....I have found it very nice to go to the bacement and just reload....it is my time, kids and wife leave me alone while I am doing the loading....you will like it.

WardenWolf
October 13, 2011, 11:18 PM
Could you explain a little more what you mean by double disc and such? Sorry, I'm a complete newbie.

sugarmaker
October 14, 2011, 10:50 AM
double disk means you have 2 charge disks stacked in the measure, 1 disk doesn't throw enough for the calibers you mention. You might want to check if 2 throws enough, depending on what you may someday load.

Hondo 60
October 14, 2011, 11:20 AM
Are there any upgrades I should buy for the press at the same time? Also, what do you guys recommend for dies?

dnmccoy said the Pro auto disc & double disk kit.
I agree those are very handy to have.

I'd also look into a Lee riser. The riser moves your powder measure up out of the way of the primer feed system.

But most importantly - a reloading manual or three.
I have 7 on my shelf & use them all.
My favorite is the Lyman 49th Reloading Manual.
It has a great how-to section plus 1,000s of load recipes.

This is far from a complete list, but I hope it's helpful.

Hondo 60
October 14, 2011, 11:24 AM
Other things to think about_

A scale to weigh powder & bullets.
A calipers to measure the length of the rounds.
These are things you can't do without.

Lee Safety Prime (lg & sm) so you don't have to handle each and every primer.
A loading block.
These are nice to have, but it is possible to load without

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