45 Colt?


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gspn
October 18, 2011, 11:06 PM
I have an opportunity to buy a bunch of guns way below current market values. A friend of a friend passed away and he had a huge collection. There are a bunch of S&W revolvers in this collection and many of them are chambered in 45 Colt.

I don't know a thing about 45 Colt.

I'm getting as many of the .357 and .44 S&W double action pieces as I can. I've not really considered the 45 Colts but the time is getting close where I have to make a decision...is there a compelling reason to have a 45 Colt? Is it just a cowboy action type cartridge? From the data I've checked it looks to be slightly less powerful than the 45 ACP and I've already got that base covered.

I dunno...I guess I'm just looking for some opinions on this. He's got several S&W 625's, Ruger single actions, and some model 25's. There is also a Colt New Frontier that looks cool.

Any thoughts are welcomed and appreciated.

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Blue Brick
October 18, 2011, 11:29 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.45_Colt

http://www.customsixguns.com/writings/dissolving_the_myth.htm

http://www.handloads.com/articles/default.asp?id=1

http://www.chuckhawks.com/45Colt.htm




Wish I still had a 45 Colt……

AK_Maine_iac
October 19, 2011, 01:22 AM
Everyone needs at least o0ne 45Colt. You can shoot any load from wimpy powder puff (cowboy action) all the way up to OMG hand numbing loads.:evil: Ruger is a (tank) 45Colt as far as durability.

rondog
October 19, 2011, 01:26 AM
Yes sir, you NEED a .45 Colt! You won't regret it. Buy all of them you can from the seller. Good guns for good prices shouldn't be passed up if at all possible. JMHO.

DPris
October 19, 2011, 02:11 AM
Slightly less powerful than the .45 ACP?
Only in the cowboy competition loads.
A properly loaded .45 Colt can bring down a horse.
I carried one as a cop years ago & did so right up till the last shift I worked before the "Bring that .45 to work tomorrow instead of the new Glock you were issued and you're fired" deadline.

I still have it, along with several other revolvers in .45 Colt.
But- if YOU can't think of a reason to want one, then you shouldn't bother.
Denis

HDCamel
October 19, 2011, 02:25 AM
Standard .45 Colt loads are slightly MORE powerful than .45 ACP. Cowboy loads are reduced recoil for competition. Fully loaded in a gun that can handle it and it rubs elbows with .44 Magnum.

Dnaltrop
October 19, 2011, 02:43 AM
Not that a Cowboy load won't do a hell of a lot of damage on it's own either.

Cowboy soft lead 250 grains kick more than my 225 Winchester Silvertips, but most normal rounds are rather pleasurable to shoot in a heavy metal revolver.

I wouldn't sit there trying to work up the most punishing loads you could in your S&W's, , but for hunting or defense a good .45 colt can keep up with a .44 mag, just not as much metal in the cylinder to hold it together against envelope pushers. .

I shoot a LOT of it, and I'd be in the poorhouse without reloading... Off the shelf .45 colt can run 70 cents to a buck a round.

Join us... then you can go join the .41 mag club afterward. :D

bannockburn
October 19, 2011, 06:34 AM
gspn

If it were me I would buy as many of those .45 revolvers as I could afford. The Colt New Frontier and the S&W Model 25 would be at the top of my list.

CajunBass
October 19, 2011, 07:45 AM
You gotta get a 45. If if you don't know what it's good for, or how powerful it is or can be, you need it just for fun.

The first time you load it, those big cartridges look like artillery shells next to 9mm's or even 38's. They drop in with a satisfying "THUNK." When you eject the empties, they look like trash cans.

In between there is a BOOM, a muzzle rise (How much depends on the load) and a kick that isn't hard, but will let you know you shot something. Heads turn along the line. This doesn't sound like your average pistol.

I can't explain it, I know it's not bigger than a Model 28, but it looks bigger. It reminds me of Hellboy's pistol. I keep thinking "Now, THIS is a gun."

http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b292/CajunBass/handguns/100_0313.jpg

http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b292/CajunBass/handguns/100_0315.jpg

Arkansas Paul
October 19, 2011, 10:02 AM
I'm a traditionalist. I like mine in single action. You said he had some Rugers, here's a pair.


The 7.5" one has never fired a factory round, except the one that came in the box with it. I've loaded everything from really light cowboy loads to "Ruger Only" wristbreakers, and they're all a blast to shoot. It really goes from one extreme to the other in power. I'm wanting to kill a deer with this one this year. The 5.5" is my dads. He got hooked on mine and had to have one.

The Smiths are great. No better actions period. If you want to load some scary powerful loads though, get one of the Rugers.

http://i902.photobucket.com/albums/ac223/prgann/Dadsnewgun026.jpg

TwoWheelFiend
October 19, 2011, 10:08 AM
.45LC is the original bad ass round.

Own a Uberti Bisley, New Model Blackhawk, and a Smith & Wesson model 25 all in .45. Great round

ghitch75
October 19, 2011, 10:23 AM
keep the 45 Colt......i kind of like'm.....i shoot Ruger only +P'S...nothin' like a 45 runnin' over 1400fps:eek:

http://i1202.photobucket.com/albums/bb368/ghitch75/S3010403.jpg

Red October
October 19, 2011, 12:00 PM
Like everyone else said: you need a .45 Colt.
The cartridges do dwarf nearly anything else it's compared to (I realize this doesn't equate to power, but there is still something satisfying about it.)
My "nightstand" gun is a S&W 6" Model 25.
It will do the job.

Edit: It's also an easy cartridge to learn to reload. They're big enough that they don't slip through your fingers as easily as some of the smaller stuff.

ColtPythonElite
October 19, 2011, 12:05 PM
He could have a M1917 that shoots .45ACP rounds.

pendennis
October 19, 2011, 12:20 PM
In a S&W model 25/625, the factory-loaded .45 Colt will work just fine. However, if you intend to juice it up to near-.44 magnum velocities and pressure, you'll need a Ruger Blackhawk, Ruger Redhawk (.454 Casull), or S&W .460 for them. The N frame just won't handle the hotter loads over time.

But even the factory-loaded .45 Colt can be a handful, depending on the stocks, and your tolerance to recoil.

Lawdawg45
October 19, 2011, 12:31 PM
I've been a fan of the .45 colt for nearly 20 years, and while I've been involved with SASS for the last 5 years, I carried a model 25 as a Police Officer, starting in 1990. It's a definite multi tasker caliber from the subsonic cowboy loads, to the medium level SWC's, all the way up to the +P loads moving at around 1500 fps. For self defense a 250 grain JHP at about 950 fps is the perfect load. My advice, BUY THEM ALL!;)

LD

BossHogg
October 19, 2011, 01:09 PM
I'd be buying the 45 Colts over the 357 or 44. I would love me some 45 colt double action.

USSR
October 19, 2011, 01:31 PM
Don't know how I could have been so foolish all those years without my S&W 25-5. Now I look at my puny .357 and kinda laugh.

Don

BCCL
October 19, 2011, 03:24 PM
Stay away from 45 Colt, this Buck hates them.................... :)

http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m103/Bear_Claw_Chris_Lappe/2010%20Deer%20Hunt/6-Ruger.jpg

I think I'm up to 4-5 wheelguns in this caliber, it is just fun to shoot!

iveschris
October 19, 2011, 05:13 PM
To mirror what LawDawg said above, there's lots of versatility in this "old" caliber. I found a S&W 25-7 (five-inch barrel, unfluted cylinder) and have been working through almost a dozen factory loads to see what is more accurate for plinking, self defense (two-legged), and animal defense (for hiking out West; saw lots and lots of grizzly sign in the Tetons this past summer and Glacier the summer before).

When stationed on the Left Coast year's ago, the smaller LE departments would often authorize any non-magnum load and '25-2s/5s and '24s were much in demand. The 225gr Silvertip seemed to be on everyone's short list as a duty/carry load.

Dnaltrop
October 19, 2011, 05:36 PM
Welcome to THR iveschris :D

jeffmack
October 19, 2011, 05:38 PM
I have a Rossi 92 carbine in 45 colt that I love. I wanted a revolver to go with it, and though I initially would have preferred a double action, I ended up with a Blackhawk in 45 colt/45 acp as well.

Although it is expensive to feed, I truly enjoy that old blackhawk. My teenage nephew, brother-in-law, and I took a bunch of firearms to the range, and at the end of the day my nephew and I agreed that, despite all the nifty modern guns we had shot, shooting 225 grain Hornandy Lever-lutions was probably our favorite.

In the lighter loads, 45 colt is not as loud or violent upon the shooter as, say, 357 mag. I have taken game with it, though, and it is as effective at stopping animals as any other handgun caliber I have seen.

PabloJ
October 19, 2011, 05:54 PM
It was and remains unbeaten to this day as the most powerful handgun used by US military. The gun was Colt 1909.

USSR
October 19, 2011, 06:17 PM
Although it is expensive to feed, I truly enjoy that old blackhawk.

You need to start casting your own bullets and reloading. Takes the price down to just a couple of bucks a box.

Don

gspn
October 19, 2011, 06:24 PM
My wife is gonna hate you guys. The bidding isn't complete yet but barring any significant changes it looks like I'll be getting five of the 45 Colts next week. All of them double action revolvers from S&W.

There are some Ruger single actions and a Colt New Fronteir available but I had to draw the line somewhere. ( I currently own a .41 mag Ruger Blackhawk so I've kind of got that base covered).

I've also got a bunch of .44's in the mix, some .38 and .357, then a couple of .380's. Looks like I'll be bringing home a bunch of guns shortly.

I'll post pics after it's all done.

Thanks for the input!

jeffmack
October 19, 2011, 06:43 PM
USSR:
I know you are right. It's just that every time I get money for reloading, I end up buying more firearms instead. :)

Super Sneaky Steve
October 19, 2011, 07:30 PM
I want a 4" Redhawk in .45 Colt BAD! :(

Lawdawg45
October 19, 2011, 07:43 PM
"The 225gr Silvertip seemed to be on everyone's short list as a duty/carry load. "

Yep, exactly what I carried.;)

LD

joed
October 19, 2011, 09:52 PM
I've owned S&W's in .44 and .45 cal. I still have the .44's but not the .45's. Sorry, but I'm not a fan of the .45 Colt. The .44 is more accurate in most cases and can do almost anything the Colt can. I also have a dislike of cartridges that leave lots of air space when loaded.

There was also one time when I loaded a .44 Mag in the Colt, they're too close in size. I never fired it but that turned me against the cartridge.

Those that have the Colt like them but I bet they don't own a .44. If I were in the market for a .45 cal revolver I'd opt for the acp.

DPris
October 20, 2011, 12:03 AM
The Silvertip is loaded comparatively light, not hard to shoot at all. Usually accuracy's good.
Not a good choice for larger animals, OK for general self-defense.
Denis

Dnaltrop
October 20, 2011, 12:06 AM
Agree with you totally DPris.

I don't feel the least bit bad feeding any Silvertips I have to my top-break replica.

Eldest still used their presence to permanently rename my Schofield to "the Werewolf gun"

rikman
October 20, 2011, 12:12 AM
You gotta get a 45. If if you don't know what it's good for, or how powerful it is or can be, you need it just for fun.

The first time you load it, those big cartridges look like artillery shells next to 9mm's or even 38's. They drop in with a satisfying "THUNK." When you eject the empties, they look like trash cans.

In between there is a BOOM, a muzzle rise (How much depends on the load) and a kick that isn't hard, but will let you know you shot something. Heads turn along the line. This doesn't sound like your average pistol.

I can't explain it, I know it's not bigger than a Model 28, but it looks bigger. It reminds me of Hellboy's pistol. I keep thinking "Now, THIS is a gun."

http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b292/CajunBass/handguns/100_0313.jpg

http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b292/CajunBass/handguns/100_0315.jpg
Cajunbass

Now why did you have to post those pics for?!?! Now I WANT one! That's a beauty!

Seedtick
October 20, 2011, 12:13 AM
I want a 4" Redhawk in .45 Colt BAD! :(

+1

That is my next toy. :cool:

Seedtick

:)

Hondo 60
October 20, 2011, 12:15 AM
45 Colt was good enough for John Wayne, wasn't it?
Nuff said!

Also give you a good reason to start reloading too.
I can reload a box (50 rds) of 45 Colt for less than $9.
If you cast your own lead bullets too? Cut that in half!

Water-Man
October 20, 2011, 12:22 AM
The Speer Gold Dot 250gr. GDHP is a good defensive round.

CajunBass
October 20, 2011, 08:50 AM
Now why did you have to post those pics for?!?! Now I WANT one! That's a beauty!

It is. Ain't it? ;)

I tried hard not to buy it. They wanted an arm, a leg, and a small dog for it. I kept trying to put it back, but my wife kept standing there saying "Oh boy...that is PRETTY. You should get that one."

Hard to convince a salesman you don't really want it when that's happening. :D

DPris
October 20, 2011, 12:13 PM
I carried the Silvertip in my duty Model 25 back in the 80s, before the department dwitched to the Federal LSWCHP.
I've worked with the Speer load over the past couple years.
Both Silvertip & Gold Dot are loaded relatively light, around 800 FPS+- through my chronograph, slightly lower on occasion with the Silvertip.

Across the handgun Silvertip line, I've found they tend to be mild loads in-caliber, and usually have good accuracy.
Denis

SAA
October 20, 2011, 01:53 PM
I don't feel the least bit bad feeding any Silvertips I have to my top-break replica.

Eldest still used their presence to permanently rename my Schofield to "the Werewolf gun"

I hope this isn't too late! DO NOT TRUST YOUR SILVERTIP AMMO TO BE EFFECTIVE AGAINST WEREWOLVES! "Silvertips" are actually aluminum. Totally useless for stopping werewolves and vampires. Be careful out there, man!

Dnaltrop
October 20, 2011, 02:40 PM
LMAO!

Don't worry, I keep a good stock of Werewolf Repellent next to my Hippo-repelling Magic rock.

Look, No hippos for MILES!!!!

Blue Brick
October 20, 2011, 06:14 PM
The Speer Gold Dot 250gr. GDHP is a good defensive round.

Heard that too.

AJumbo
October 21, 2011, 12:27 AM
.45 Colt, The Once And Future King.
Seriously, get at least one Ruger. I love those Smiths, too, but you need to celebrate Gun Safe Diversity! Dunno if I could pass up that New Frontier, either.

orionengnr
October 21, 2011, 08:32 PM
I've owned S&W's in .44 and .45 cal. I still have the .44's but not the .45's.
I am exactly the opposite. Had .44s, sold them, now I own .41 Mag and .45LC.

Those that have the Colt like them but I bet they don't own a .44. Yep, you win that bet...:)

Quoheleth
October 22, 2011, 07:46 AM
You'll love the Smith 25s. I have a 25-5, 6" "1950 Target Model" and it is a smooth, sweet shooter. DA is typical Smith smooth, but the SA trigger I would put against anything out there. Literally, just twitch your trigger finger and BOOM! Thar' she blows!

What was said about mini-howitzer shells is right-on. I reload for my .45 Colt ammo (Missouri Bullet) with both a 250 LRNFP and a 255 SWC over 8 gr Unique. Both are more accurate than me. The SWC cuts nice, clean almost 1/2" holes in paper -- nice and intimidating. Lately, I've enjoyed using the big bullet to make my steel plate really dance at the 50 yard line. It's a lot of fun to have the heavy BOOM and a split second later KA-THUNK on steel. It gets folks' attention. By handloading, I get my cost down to under $10/50 (I don't count the cost of the brass as they'll reload multiple times). While that's more than my handloaded .38 or .357, it's still affordable and very shootable.

Don't try to turn the Smith into a .45 Magnum - it's not made for it, and it doesn't need to be one. Keep it safe to SAAMI levels and enjoy the heck out of that gun.

gspn
October 22, 2011, 11:02 AM
ok...I now own some .45 colt. I picked up S&W models 625-5, 25-5 (x2), 25-9 (x2), and a 625-3. they are all in great shape and most came with holsters and I can get a ton of ammo for them dirt cheap (maybe half the cost of retail).

I have to wait til Monday to get my paws on them. can't wait. I got 7 or 8 other guns too...but these were the 45 colts.

Missionary
October 22, 2011, 01:33 PM
Greetings
Never go wrong with a caliber .45 handgun (or rifle). Plus you should always look at the swapping side of a firearm. Good deals do not come along every day.
Mike in Peru

robhof
October 22, 2011, 03:05 PM
The 250gr WFN soft lead is also a good defensive round and very accurate out of both my ROA and Blackhawk. Loaded to standard loads, the 45LC brass has lasted through several reloads, many more loads than my 357Max's do.

sw282
October 23, 2011, 03:31 AM
l have a S&W 25-3 in 45 Colt. Most Accurate handgun l own

Scipio Africanus
October 23, 2011, 11:45 PM
The .45 Colt is a wonderful cartridge. In modern Ruger handguns, it is one of the most versatile cartridges around. You can load (or buy) very mild recoiling rounds that are still quit effective or loads that will meet or exceed the much vaunted .44 mag. Probably my favorite handgun cartridge ever. You can't go wrong with a .45 Colt.

gspn
October 23, 2011, 11:51 PM
Let me throw this question out to the 45 Colt fans...would I be better off with Ruger single action revolvers than with the S&W double actions?

There are a number of Ruger new model Blackhawk and Super Blackhawks that I can get at very good prices...do those models offer a substantial benefit?

I've always heard that the Rugers can handle higher pressure loads...but I don't now if it's a material difference over the other guns I listed.

There is also a nice Colt New Frontier in 45 Colt with a 5.5 inch barrel...it's a pretty gun...I just don't know if I'd get a lot out of it.

DPris
October 24, 2011, 02:45 AM
What use are you looking at?
That's the decider in "better off", and it varies from person to person.
Denis

41 Mag
October 24, 2011, 05:53 AM
I've owned S&W's in .44 and .45 cal. I still have the .44's but not the .45's. Sorry, but I'm not a fan of the .45 Colt. The .44 is more accurate in most cases and can do almost anything the Colt can. I also have a dislike of cartridges that leave lots of air space when loaded.

There was also one time when I loaded a .44 Mag in the Colt, they're too close in size. I never fired it but that turned me against the cartridge.

Those that have the Colt like them but I bet they don't own a .44. If I were in the market for a .45 cal revolver I'd opt for the acp.

To be honest, I have found that the 45 Colt is every bit as accurate as my 44. As for air space, well that depends on what you stuff them with, and air space really has no bearing on accuracy or performance in most handgun calibers.

As for owning both the 44 and 45, yep have them both, actually I have two 45 Colts, a 41mag, and a 454. I can easily do everything with the 454 that any of the rest will do, but it's not so much being able to do something as much as having those other somethings to do it with.

gspn
October 25, 2011, 12:06 AM
but it's not so much being able to do something as much as having those other somethings to do it with

Great way to put it!

mes227
October 25, 2011, 12:24 AM
As for owning both the 44 and 45, yep have them both, actually I have two 45 Colts, a 41mag, and a 454. I can easily do everything with the 454 that any of the rest will do, but it's not so much being able to do something as much as having those other somethings to do it with.

I'm with you! I have several revolvers in each: .45Colt, .45acp (and of course .45AutoRim), 44Mag, .41Mag, one each .454Casull (which also chambers .45Colt), .460Mag (.454 Casull & .45 Colt), Governor (.45Colt. .45acp, .410), .460Rowland and .445SuperMag. Plus 4 1911s in .45acp. I love the big bores!

tpelle
October 26, 2011, 01:21 PM
When reloading, remember that the .45 Colt was originally designed for black powder. It's easily possible to push it way past the redline with smokeless powder. Elmer Keith found that out way back in the day, and is precisely why we have the .44 Magnum and not the .45 Magnum.

Having said that, I do love my .45 Colt Cimarron SA.

http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c354/tpelle/Cimarron%20Model%20P/DSCN0648.jpg

USSR
October 26, 2011, 06:15 PM
When reloading, remember that the .45 Colt was originally designed for black powder. It's easily possible to push it way past the redline with smokeless powder.

The .45 Colt's ability to handle smokeless powder is determined by the particular firearm that uses it, not the cartridge itself. In your case, with a Cimarron SA, you are pretty much restricted to low pressure smokeless loads.

Don

41 Mag
October 26, 2011, 07:24 PM
When reloading, remember that the .45 Colt was originally designed for black powder. It's easily possible to push it way past the redline with smokeless powder. Elmer Keith found that out way back in the day, and is precisely why we have the .44 Magnum and not the .45 Magnum.

Having said that, I do love my .45 Colt Cimarron SA.

I whole heartedly agree. There again however depending on the revolver manufacturer you can spruce them up a bit. The end thing I hope that folks will remember however is that no matter the firearm, the cases are still only built to withstand a certain pressure level. This is where I feel a LOT of folks fail to keep things in check when wanting to hotrod one.

USSR
October 26, 2011, 08:59 PM
Will the "weak cases" talk never end? They haven't made the balloon-head .45 Colt cases since the 1950's, and the modern solid-head cases are not engineered down to withstand only low pressure loads.:banghead:

Don

Arkansas Paul
October 26, 2011, 11:28 PM
the modern solid-head cases are not engineered down to withstand only low pressure loads.


I can attest to that!
I've put some stuff through my Blackhawk that scared the hell out of me. It was published stuff though, for Rugers, T/C, and Freedom Arms stuff of course.

I LOVE the .45 Colt and always will, but I like the .44 as well. I'll probably add one to the collection eventually. I want to get in to handgun hunting more seriously and want a revolver I can scope. I'm thinking maybe a Super Redhawk in .44 mag maybe.

41 Mag
October 27, 2011, 07:59 PM
Will the "weak cases" talk never end? They haven't made the balloon-head .45 Colt cases since the 1950's, and the modern solid-head cases are not engineered down to withstand only low pressure loads.

Don

I do not recall anyone mentioning the balloon head cases, and the modern ones do not have to be engineered "down" if they were never engineered "up" to begin with. The fact of the matter is they were designed to operate within a certain pressure limit as all cases are. This said the nominal pressure for a 45 Colt is not the same as a 454 Casull, nor a 44 magnum. You can get away with some loads, in some cases, for a while, but eventually it will bite your rear.

There are a ton of factors which can and do add to pressures in revolver cases. Just because YOU advocate it as being something EVERYONE should practice, doesn't make it proper. You can cliff dive all you want, it doesn't mean everyone standing there watching is in line to follow. Nor does it mean that just because you miss the cliff or the rocks in the water that the next fellow who figured it's safe will.

If I, or anyone else for that matter, wants high pressure loads they can easily be found moving up to the 454 and get all they want and then some. I can also shoot my Ruger to the nominal listed loads, and be perfectly fine with that.

MyGreenGuns
October 27, 2011, 08:31 PM
I got a 10mm fan to shutup about how HUGE his rounds were by putting a .45LC in his hand. He asked what I shot it out of while looking at my pile of longarms. He didnt say anything as I started blasting with a revolver.

RalphS
October 27, 2011, 10:12 PM
This is what Starline states on their website -
45 Colt Brass (Large Pistol primer) 1.273"-1.283" O.A.L.

Originally designed for use with blackpowder, the .45 Colt is one of the most powerful, commonly available handgun cartridges when loaded with smokeless powder. Our .45 Colt brass has been tested to .44 Magnum pressures in gun systems suitable for such loads.

Most of the hot loaded 45LC ammo manufacturers use Starline brass.

USSR
October 27, 2011, 10:44 PM
Thanks for that post RalphS. Something that some people don't realize is, the original .357 Magnum was the .38/.44 loaded in .38 Special brass, and the original .44 Magnum was EK's hot loads in .44 Special brass. The weakness in modern solid-head brass is not the case, it's the platform that they are fired in.

There are a ton of factors which can and do add to pressures in revolver cases. Just because YOU advocate it as being something EVERYONE should practice, doesn't make it proper.

Please, a quote where I advocate EVERYONE doing this. I am only saying that the limiting factor is the firearm, not the brass.

Don

SAA
October 27, 2011, 10:46 PM
The end thing I hope that folks will remember however is that no matter the firearm, the cases are still only built to withstand a certain pressure level. This is where I feel a LOT of folks fail to keep things in check when wanting to hotrod one.


Where are you getting this stuff? We aren't talking rifles here. The thin chamber wall in a revolver cylinder will give out LONG before any stupid brass case that is supported by it will!!!

tpelle
October 28, 2011, 12:43 PM
I probably wasn't clear enough in my comment regarding pushing the .45 Colt to too high of a pressure. I wasn't alluding to any weakness in the cartridge case, but possible weakness in the cylinder walls. My Cimarron depicted in my post above almost scares me when I open the loading gate and look at how thin the cylinder wall is! Especially considering that the locking notch cuts into that thinness even more.

I can see how Elmer Keith blew up a Colt SAA with heavy .45 Colt reloads!

If I were to want to heavy-load a .45 Colt I'd only shoot 'em in a Ruger!

41 Mag
October 28, 2011, 06:00 PM
Hey, you folks are free to load to what ever limit you feel prudent, but there is no since posting it in an open forum was what I was getting at. The mention of the "cylinder will give out long before any case", is plenty argument for me to bow out of this argument, you win.

I'm done, you obviously know way more than the 40'ish years of handloading experience I have. I just pity the poor soul who reads your post, and blows his wheel gun up in his face is all.

I just want to know one thing, where is your testing done on all this brass that guarantees it will handle the pressures you pushing to to. Starline brass is the only reference noted here, and there are quite few brands still left to mention. Even the Starline doesn't mention the "system" from which it was tested.

As for the rifle load nope we're not talking them at all and not sure why that was even prudent in this at all.

I have a Ruger, and it will handle plenty, but I also have a 454 which will handle plenty more. But why would I want to rag out the Ruger with a heavy, high pressure load, when I can simply shoot the 454.

If you want that type of spread on your loads why not go with the 454 to begin with where you can shoot lighter loaded 454 rounds, or even 45 Colt rounds, but you do not need to hot rod them just so you can say you did. But I guess that some folks have to say they been there done that and have the t-shirt to prove it.

SAA
October 28, 2011, 07:38 PM
Nothing here, move along please.

SAA
October 28, 2011, 07:42 PM
Hey, you folks are free to load to what ever limit you feel prudent, but there is no since posting it in an open forum was what I was getting at. The mention of the "cylinder will give out long before any case", is plenty argument for me to bow out of this argument, you win....I just want to know one thing, where is your testing done on all this brass that guarantees it will handle the pressures you pushing to to.

Tell you what, take a wimpy .45 Colt "cowboy" load that wouldn't blow up any cylinder ever made and detonate it in your hand. Afterall, the brass will contain the pressure, eh? Do you honestly believe that any load large enough to blow out a cylinder wall will be contained by the cartridge brass, no matter who made it? Brass vs. steel, no brainer.



I have a Ruger, and it will handle plenty,

So, which is it? The gun or the brass that makes this so? You're the dangerous one here, as you've been implying that a gun can withstand higher pressures if you just use the right brass. Ain't so, at least not in the past 40-ish years since all the brass made has been solid head.;) Even when a balloon headed case fails the cylinder still doesn't blow up. And, funny thing, I've seen plenty of brass split full length in the chamber, and guess what, the cylinder didn't blow up even though the brass utterly failed! Some big surprise, eh?

DWFan
October 29, 2011, 06:41 AM
The Rugers can handle up to 32 kpsi but, unless you are really into recoil or are going up against large dangerous animals, the S&W's loaded to .45 ACP pressures (21-23 kpsi) will do the job just as effectively. A Lyman #454424 255gr SWC at 1150 fps or RCBS 45-270-SAA 270gr SWC at 1000 fps are plenty potent.

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