Paul Barrett’s: Glock, The Rise of America’s Gun


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Cheytac
November 3, 2011, 04:56 PM
I have had the privilege to have read a Galley copy of Mr. Barrett’s book, Glock, The Rise of America’s Gun. It was a most enjoyable read and quite different than what I expected. When I first heard about it and then learning that Mr. Barrett is a Managing Editor of Bloomberg Businessweek, I assumed that it would be anti-2nd Amendment. I even read a review which expressed my concerns also.

However, as we all know what assuming actually means… I will know say, after reading the book, that my assumption was incorrect. Mr. Barrett’s book isn’t Anti-2nd Amendment. It really doesn’t go either way; for or against. With the depth of his research I feel that he may actually be Pro-2nd Amendment.

There are a few items that I was disappointed with, but what book have we read that we totally agreed with? Towards the end of the book, Mr. Barrett starts to lean towards restricting magazine capacity. Often through-out the book he mentions “high capacity” as an evil thing. He also believes that the gun owners of America would agree with a lower magazine capacity.

He did point out that the Glock wasn’t the first polymer handgun and he did point out a couple of times that other handguns held more than a Glock. After that, Glocks were the guns that held the “most” rounds.

In regards to the Luby’s Cafeteria massacre in Killeen, Texas he mentions the Glock that was used and extra magazines for it. However, he failed to mention the Ruger P89 that was also used. In the Northern Illinois University massacre, he failed to mention that the shooting started with a shotgun which was reloaded at least once and other firearms the killer had. The Glock dominated this shooting in the book.

I was pleased to see that he mentioned Mrs. Hupp, who was at Luby’s with her parents, and her pro-gun and pro-carry views. It is unfortunate, as he mentioned that this one day, she left her revolver in her vehicle. She may have been able to save many people, including her parents.

Also interesting was how he pointed out how so many LEOs are not gun enthusiast, do not train regularly with firearms, and view them merely as another tool on their belt. Yet, so many LEOs feel that citizens shouldn’t be able to carry guns. Yet many civilians train more than the average LEO.

Then the book gets to the meat of the subject matter, Gaston Glock and his handgun. While I may own four Glocks and have read a little about Glock, this was a very interesting book. There is so much more to the handgun, Mr. Glock, and the Glock business that I didn’t know.

I would encourage anyone that owns a Glock, is thinking about buying a Glock, or anyone who has firearms to get the book and read it. I doubt you will be disappointed and you will not be put-off by any Anti-2nd Amendment rhetoric. It is truly a look at the move from revolvers to semi-automatic handguns and more specifically the history of Glock, the life of Gaston Glock, and a look into his empire.

Cheytac

PS His book is how I found this place, so I thought that I should post my review here as well.

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TexasRifleman
November 3, 2011, 05:08 PM
It is unfortunate, as he mentioned that this one day, she left her revolver in her vehicle. She may have been able to save many people, including her parents.

Just to clarify:

It was illegal for her to take it into the restaurant, it's not like she left it in the car just that one time, she left it in the car all the time. In fact it was illegal then for her to even have it in the car most of the time back then.

Fishslayer
November 3, 2011, 08:14 PM
"America's Gun."

Sure, whatever...

Hacker15E
November 4, 2011, 09:51 AM
How, exactly, is a firearm designed and built in Austria "America's Gun"?

Chopdoktor
November 4, 2011, 10:02 AM
Redacted.
*(nevermind)*

parsimonious_instead
November 4, 2011, 10:43 AM
It may seem silly to call it "America's Gun" but Mr. Barrett is a good writer, and writers choose their words pretty carefully.
Remember - he's a business journalist with an interest in firearms and the firearm industry, not a gun writer.
His book is first and foremost a story of a hypersuccessful business, and the man who started it.
It's quite common to hear of meteoric business success here in the States, and rather rare in Europe.
Although Glock benefitted from fulfilling the sidearm needs of the Austrian and other European armies, as a company it achieved the "next level" when he started selling in volumes to US police departments and then to non-LEO American customers.
The Glock might not be a "native American" firearm like the revolver or 1911, but millions have been sold here in the States.
In the pages of Barrett's book, he details how Glock's sales team exhibited American-style innovation in both the manufacturing and marketing of the weapon. Suddenly, the traditional, iconic American gun makers were Old School, and the European was the scrappy upstart. This inversion gives the title some additional cheeky irony.
Glocks have captured a huge market share among gun enthusiasts, as well as becoming a pop cultural symbol. Even as most street thugs are found with .38 snubbies, .25 Ravens and the like, Glocks became the predominant weapon mentioned in rap lyrics.
They're featured endlessly in American cop shows and action films.
Barrett even makes the point that in most places that visually depict "no firearms allowed" the silhouetted firearm usually looks like a Glock.

robinkevin
November 4, 2011, 12:33 PM
I agree with others calling it "America's gun" when it isn't design nor build in the USA is almost a slap in the face if you ask me. Kinda like calling Toyota "America's car company" just because they sell a lot in the US, but even they have plants here.

Bottom line the Colt 1911, or Colt Single Action would be much more deserving of such title.

EDIT: Just for the record I drive a Toyota Tundra...

Cosmoline
November 4, 2011, 01:46 PM
Yeah, but in a way Toyota *IS* America's car company. America's market made that brand a world leader, and it became something of a legend here for efficiency, economy and reliability. The Glocks came to prominence along side the rise of shall issue laws and have sold incredibly well here. Like Toyota cars they challenged the "big three" handgun makers--Colt, S&W and Ruger. And there's no denying Americans love them, and buy them.

Paul Barrett
November 5, 2011, 04:07 PM
First, thanks for the interest in my book. Much appreciated.

No need for devotees of the venerable 1911 to take offense at my subtitle. I have great respect for the 1911's historic role. "The Rise of America's Gun" indicates that Glock became the iconic handgun of the late 20th century when Americans (cops, civilians, movie directors) adopted the Austrian pistol as their own. I chose the words carefully. I did not call it an "American Gun." On many levels, the Glock became America's Gun.

To those who have posted positive reactions to the uncorrected galley proof, my thanks! The final version of the book will be released Jan 10, 2012 (with typos fixed). You can preorder a copy right now, at a fat discount, from Amazon.com. I'd appreciate pre-orders, because they signal demand, and that signal ripples back through Amazon to my publisher, Crown. The more early demand, the more likely Crown will do a second printing more quickly.

If you are a serious blogger or freqent poster to firearm websites (or any websites, for that matter), I can arrange for you to gain online access to the galley. To make that arrangement with Crown, I will need a personal email. Send to me at pmb32861@yahoo.com. You have to commit to writing a review and getting it around. This isn't supposed to be a way to score a freebie.:)

Thanks and all the best,
Paul Barrett
www.glockthebook.com

Cosmoline
November 5, 2011, 04:21 PM
Thanks for posting and welcome to THR!

FYI Barnes and Nobel doesn't have them in yet, the clerk said they had been pushed back a month? Not sure if that's supposed to be happening.

Paul Barrett
November 5, 2011, 08:52 PM
Glock: The Rise of America's Gun is out officially on Jan 10, 2012. It has not been pushed back. Thank you for asking about it. If you're thinking of getting the book, and I hope you are, I suggest pre-ordering at Amazon.com, where you can currently get a huge discount and have it delivered on Jan 10. Thanks again for your interest. -- Paul Barrett

Cheytac
November 7, 2011, 10:51 AM
The title isn't a slam against America or any American firearms manufacturer. It is simply a story of how the Glock became so popular in America and how Glock overtook many firearms manufacturers here is America. Upon reading teh book, you will understand the title.


Texas, I saw her interview and I truly believe that she would rather have faced the consequences for carrying her revolver than the loss that she suffered. My wording is from her mouth, not mine.

Paul Barrett
November 7, 2011, 12:48 PM
I'm pleased to share this review of GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun, written by Derek (aka The Packing Rat), who knows guns and grub. Nice guy, too. Derek was kind enough to collect up a bunch of other gun blog posts at the end of his review...

http://thepackingrat.net/2011/11/05/glock-the-rise-of-americas-gun/

All the best,
Paul Barrett
@GlockTheBook

MD_Willington
November 7, 2011, 03:52 PM
Joe Huffmans review: http://blog.joehuffman.org/2011/10/10/GlockTheRiseOfAmericasGun.aspx

Ry Jones review: http://blog.ryjones.org/2011/09/23/glock-the-rise-of-americas-gun/

EddieNFL
November 7, 2011, 08:18 PM
EDIT: Just for the record I drive a Toyota Tundra...

Me too...built in Princeton, Indiana.

parsimonious_instead
November 7, 2011, 08:30 PM
My brand new Hyundai... built in Alabama. (To keep it firearm related, it's the car I use to take my guns to the range) :)

Fishslayer
November 8, 2011, 01:48 AM
I did not call it an "American Gun." On many levels, the Glock became America's Gun.


Thanks for posting and welcome to the forum!

I'm gonna go ahead and...ummm... disagree... on the America's gun thing. At least for me.

OTOH hand, this has been going around the internet for quite awhile. Essentially a statement regarding the ignorance of media types regarding guns in general. It's pretty accurate. So in a way, you're kinda right in as much as when anything bad happens, it's gonna be a Glock or an AK-47 that's the villain.:rolleyes:

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_LnlAerzwJJA/TTHk1jNWZMI/AAAAAAAAAzg/U6_NmQEsTpw/s1600/firearms-identification-guide.jpg

Paul Barrett
November 8, 2011, 09:07 AM
This spoof chart is, in fact, funny, and it does point accurately to the mainstream media's tendency to get confused about firearm issues. The chart also underscores what I'm writing about in GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun. In this country, many, many people who know little or nothing about guns think "Glock" is the equivalent of "handgun." I think that's fascinating. How did it come to pass? That's one of the questions I answer in the book.

Blackhawk30
November 8, 2011, 11:07 AM
I've heard Glock has made 5 million and 4 million were sold in the US.True or not?

parsimonious_instead
November 8, 2011, 12:55 PM
A couple of days ago Paul Barrett and his lovely wife Julie met up with me at my local range. The three of us ate an enjoyable lunch and then spent a couple of hours at the shooting club to which I belong. They both really enjoy shooting and in fact Julie is the better of the two with a rifle - she really enjoyed my Ruger 10/22, and Paul got a kick out of my Marlin 1894c in .357/.38 Special.

Paul Barrett
November 8, 2011, 08:00 PM
Re proportion of Glock sales: As a privately held company, Glock has never had to disclose figures on total sales. Based on my industry interviews and import figures compiled by the USG (which are by country, not brand), the 5 million figure is roughly accurate. I have been told by former Glock execs that 90% of sales are in the US -- that's in terms of dollars. So...you're in the ballpark.

Re our chew -n- shoot with Parsimonious, I have to confess that his description is entirely accurate. We enjoyed a lovely fall day upstate, and my lovely and talented wife is a far better shooter than I. Facts are facts.

Paul
@GlockTheBook

RatherNotSay
November 8, 2011, 08:04 PM
I'm a glock guy and even I don't get the title "America's Gun"

Cosmoline
November 8, 2011, 08:15 PM
Well apparently ninety percent of the sales are in the US. Thus the use of the possessive, I assume. Don't confuse "America's Gun" with "American Gun"

Paul Barrett
November 9, 2011, 11:29 AM
I'm a glock guy and even I don't get the title "America's Gun"
The United States embraced the Glock, turning an obscure Austrian pistol into "America's Gun." Today, when many Americans (mostly non-gun people) want to refer to a semiauto pistol, they say, "Glock." When movie and television directors put a gun in a cop's hand, it's usually a Glock. When a crime novelist wants to refer to a handgun in a sophisticated way, they refer to a "Glock." Look at the American handgun market in 1985 (dominated by revolvers and 1911s); look at that market today (dominated by Glocks and Glock-like models). That begins to explain the subtitle. Thanks for your interest! Hope you get the book, since you're a "Glock guy," and I can't imagine readers who would enjoy it more than Glock guys (and gals). All the best, Paul Barrett @GlockTheBook

RatherNotSay
November 10, 2011, 04:11 PM
The United States embraced the Glock, turning an obscure Austrian pistol into "America's Gun." Today, when many Americans (mostly non-gun people) want to refer to a semiauto pistol, they say, "Glock." When movie and television directors put a gun in a cop's hand, it's usually a Glock. When a crime novelist wants to refer to a handgun in a sophisticated way, they refer to a "Glock." Look at the American handgun market in 1985 (dominated by revolvers and 1911s); look at that market today (dominated by Glocks and Glock-like models). That begins to explain the subtitle. Thanks for your interest! Hope you get the book, since you're a "Glock guy," and I can't imagine readers who would enjoy it more than Glock guys (and gals). All the best, Paul Barrett @GlockTheBook

I guess I can kind of understand but to say that glock "dominates" the market today is a little subjective. Maybe 20 years ago but "dominates" a strong word. Is it popular? OF COURSE! Is it considered one of the most reliable guns today? Of course! The directors and novelist are, I'm sorry to say, not very informed when it comes to the firearm market. I've honestly never heard of "non gun people" referring to semi autos as "glocks" in particular. It sounds like an interesting read though. I'll try and pick it up as it sparks an interest.

Paul Barrett
November 11, 2011, 09:49 AM
Well, all I can ask is that you pick it up and give it a read. Once you have, let's continue this discussion about the Glock's role not just in American gun circles but in the larger culture. I hope I persuade you that Glock has had more of an impact than many people realize. In any event, if you are inclined to get the book (either the Kindle version or the good old dead tree version), Amazon.com is offering a terrific discount if you "pre-order" now for delivery Jan 10. All the best, and thanks again for your interest, Paul Barrett @GlockTheBook

zfk55
November 11, 2011, 10:15 AM
And are you, in fact pro RKBA, or into restrictions placed on firearms as pertains to mag capacity and types of firearms deemed "proper" for us to own?

Paul Barrett
November 14, 2011, 09:46 AM
I'm not sure I'm obliged to respond to your loyalty test, but I will say this: The Second Amendment is right there in the Bill of Rights. The U.S. Supreme Court has interpreted the Second Amendment to mean that laws that effectively ban the possession of handguns are unconstitutional. The Supreme Court, Justice Antonin Scalia for the majority, has also said that the Second Amendment does not prevent government from imposing reasonable restrictions on the RKBA, such as prohibiting children, the mentally ill, and felons from buying or possessing firearms.

If you read my book, GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun, you'll see that my personal views on gun control are not central to telling the story of the Glock's rise in the United States. I don't think my personal views are all that important (who cares, really?). What I hope to offer is not so much an argument about the RKBA, but a narrative history of interest to a wide range of readers holding various views on the appropriate role and regulation firearms. Thanks much for your interest. -- Paul Barrett @GlockTheBook

TheJ
December 21, 2011, 04:20 PM
This is a great read. I found it fascinating both as somebody who has a big interest in Glock and other firearms generally as well as how the business achieved it's status in the America. I found the story that unfolded as I learned about some of the history and players behind the success of Glock to be surprisingly exciting and even riveting at times. The more I read the book the the more I wanted to keep reading it. I was actually disappointed that it had to end.

SleazyRider
December 21, 2011, 08:25 PM
I look forward to reading your book and to your reading at The Book Court in Brooklyn on the tenth!

Paul Barrett
December 21, 2011, 09:59 PM
Members of The High Road are cordially invited to a reading and reception for

GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun

January 10 @ 7pm
Book Court, 163 Court Street, Brooklyn, NY (Cobble Hill)

I'll read from and discuss the book, and we'll lift a glass, if you're so inclined.
Please stop by and say hello (and buy a book)!

All best,
Paul Barrett
Author, GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun
www.glockthebook.com

theCloud
December 21, 2011, 11:22 PM
I'm not gonna buy the book. No way.
But I will download it onto my iPad! :D

baronthered
December 22, 2011, 04:55 AM
I don't shop online but my local bookstore has mine pre-ordered.

ball3006
December 22, 2011, 08:57 AM
Glocks are now made somewhere over in GA now...............While your Chevy or Ford pickups are made in Canada or Mexico.........chris3

rosewood151
December 22, 2011, 09:01 AM
RobinKevin said "Just for the record I drive a Toyota Tundra..." Just for the record, your Tundra was built in San Antonio Texas or Princeton Indiana. ;)

youngda9
December 22, 2011, 09:59 AM
RobinKevin said "Just for the record I drive a Toyota Tundra..." Just for the record, your Tundra was built in San Antonio Texas or Princeton Indiana. ;)
Assembled...not designed, analyzed, procured, and tested.. The profits go overseas. (But this is another topic all together. Let's not threadjack) ;)

Hacker15E
December 22, 2011, 10:14 AM
Assembled...not designed, analyzed, procured, and tested.. The profits go overseas.

Except for the profits that go into the very American pockets of the dealer, the US distributor who takes delivery from the factory, the US shippers who move the vehicles by train or truck from the factory to the distributor, all the Americans who work at Toyota USA headquarters in California, all the maintenance people who will work on the truck during it's lifetime, etc.

But other than THAT, you're right..."the profits go overseas".

Zoogster
December 22, 2011, 12:09 PM
I think it is interesting the author would make comments in favor of capacity restrictions when it is the capacity of the Glock that is one of the primary reasons the firearm became popular in the United States and appealed to police.
Faster reloads and higher capacity are the reasons the wonder nines were adopted by police to begin with. That police adoption being what led to widespread civilian adoption.
Without an average capacity 2-3x a typical revolver transition to 'wonder nines' is unlikely to have happened.


I don't know what the book covers and myself am not likely to read it, but I seem to recall Glock originally obtained a large following in the USA by nearly giving away Glocks at a little more than cost to police departments.
Police departments that were adopting 'wonder nines', the primary advantage of them over revolvers being capacity and faster reloads.
Over time this marketing strategy of getting them into the hands of police even if it meant severely reducing profits resulted in the firearm becoming an iconic police firearm.

Your average citizens typically being clueless like to purchase what the police or the military are using out of an assumption that they are the shooting professionals or 'gun experts' and so what they are using must have superior qualities overall to many other options.
You see this trend with several firearms, and the Glock was no exception.
(While the military and many police policies do tend to have minimum standards that make this a safe bet for those without much knowledge, it certainly doesn't meet the level of assumption by the general public.)
So by getting Glocks into the hands of huge numbers of police, Glock got themselves a massive following of people that wanted to buy the gun the police were adopting.


Polymer firearms also cost less to manufacturer than old fashioned steel framed guns, and so since Glock got away with charging as much for a plastic gun as the competition charged for a metal gun, they made a lot more profit per firearm. The industry quickly followed suit marketing and making polymer frames as a result (and pitching the lighter weight and other traits to encourage the market.) Profit is simply greater on a plastic gun, unless the market had demanded it be sold for cheaper, which it did not.
Today as plastic guns become the norm the general firearm price point is based around that, and people now often pay more for quality metal firearms, but originally Glock had a serious advantage.


Glocks work well, a quality product is of course important. I personally find them a good tool.


However I will not be purchasing the book and supporting the writer who has focused on tarnishing Glock in the past while writing for Bloomberg Businessweek.
The focus on trying to get Glock into trouble over tax evasion for example is quite obvious.
Most of big business and many in Congress do similar things, yet because Glock is a firearm manufacturer there is more effort to see them in trouble.
Many times things like 'tax evasion' are discretionary, a bunch of otherwise legal things that someone feels is illegal because all these otherwise legal things are done to reduce how much they will owe in taxes.
Businesses with lots of money, teams of lawyers and financial analysts, and a global business, find ways to protect that money and limit potential loss and liability. One of the ways many do so is to create several officially separate businesses, located in different parts of the world, and focusing each one on working on what the local laws make most profitable. Some of which may focus on only a limited number of things. Not putting all of their eggs in one basket in one company within one nation, and having a business model that makes the most of the laws they operate under within each nation.
While those wanting to take their money can label such things 'shell companies' and accuse them of tax evasion. Among other things.
Those with political anti-gun agendas can focus on gun companies doing what is otherwise quite normal in big business in an attempt to demonize them and get them into trouble. They can even make it appear they are just reporting the facts, and unbiased, while the accusations and intentional focus and coverage on them is itself due to a bias.
Because of past writings by the author, and who they have written for, I am inclined to believe their motivation is partially from something which is not beneficial to the firearm community.
Even though I commend their willingness to get out and promote the selling of their book by personally visiting the forums mentioning his book and most likely to put money in his pockets by buying it.

I think throwing money at him may be only a little better than giving a contribution to Bloomberg himself. Someone knowing about what they write about does not make them friendly to it.
Josh Sugarmann of Violence Policy Center has maintained a Federal Firearm License for quite some time and knew what he was talking about, even while actively working to remove gun rights for Americans.

Dr.Mall Ninja
December 22, 2011, 12:21 PM
I'm not sure I'm obliged to respond to your loyalty test
I feel like that question is legit, you are on a website based on RBKA asking us to support you. All he was asking about magazine restrictions is do you support us? Paul do you own a glock?

I'm not trying to beat you up,i'm consdiering buying the book.

2ifbyC
December 22, 2011, 02:22 PM
I too believe the title is presumptuous. It’s worse than saying the Dallas Cowboy’s are America’s team; at least the Cowboys have American roots. A better title would have been “Glock: The rise of the polymer gun.” I do believe that the analysis that Zoogster provided for the rise is spot-on.
However, in fairness to the author, I can not offer an appraisal without having read the book.

The fact is we have become a global economy. And the number one goal of any company is corporate profits. So labor costs, raw material, government regulation, tax liabilities, unions, as nauseam; all play a part is pricing a product. And where best to sell firearms? England? Canada? How about the USA with gun enthusiasts with the constitutional right to bear arms? So, even with anecdotal data alone, the rise of reliable, accurate, high capacity, light weight handguns is no surprise.

The question in my mind and others as well is the conundrum of financially supporting the author by purchasing his book vis-à-vis the author’s reluctance to voice his personal view on high capacity magazines. I can appreciate the desire of the author to market his book on a gun enthusiast’s forum but he has a duty to reveal his position on the tenets that we law abiding gun owners embrace.

SWMAN
December 22, 2011, 03:13 PM
90% of Glock sales are in the U.S.? What proportion of sale are civilian? Looks like if the U.S. didn't have a 2nd amendment and a strong gun lobby Glocks might be Austria's gun.

Zoogster
December 22, 2011, 04:23 PM
SWman said: What proportion of sale are civilian? Looks like if the U.S. didn't have a 2nd amendment and a strong gun lobby Glocks might be Austria's gun.

Most gun makers in the world have two legal options, sell to military and police, or sell to the US civilian population.
Large contracts with a military can be great or horrible. They can end a contract and leave you with no recourse and lacking customers, or buy huge numbers at a time and generate vast profits. They are not a dependable constant source of money, and as your only customer make innovation difficult.
Invent something in the civilian market and some may buy it, others will not, and it may at least pay for itself and make some profit. This at least allows you to be creative (like say Kel Tec.) Invent something for the military market and they don't adopt it? Dead end, at least for the foreseeable future and budgets you must balance.
This makes a civilian market much more fluid and ideal, even if you don't get the same bulk sales when things go well.

The result is most gun makers ideally want to sell in the American market, the largest market there is. Especially if they are playing by all the NATO and UN, and EU laws that make export to other potential markets really difficult.


The US gun laws on imports do limit things though.
There is a lot of rules importers must follow that domestic manufacturers do not. Giving most of the CCW market to domestic production for example because small guns, .380 chambered guns, etc don't score enough points to import, and features are required that make them hard to produce in a price competitive manner with American produced models.
Many of the more popular guns in the US are not legal for import. Even many of the Glocks have been imported in a configuration different from the one they are sold in because they don't score enough points for legal import.
Both pistols and revolvers must score a minimum number of points on two different points by feature systems for import, while domestic manufacturers don't have to score any points.
A Ruger LCP or Kel-Tec P3AT for example, popular guns in the US, would never be legal to import and nearly impossible to put into a configuration that would allow it.
Then there is 922(r) for long guns.
Many guns perfectly legal to produce, sell, and own in the US are illegal to import into the US.
This puts foreign manufacturers at a significant disadvantage to those producing guns within the US, and they cannot even take part in large proportions of the market. But it is still the largest market in the world, so if they can find a niche or way in they will.
The other option many take is to open a manufacturing facility in the US to get around the import restrictions.

Paul Barrett
December 23, 2011, 10:38 AM
Thank you for the interest in my book, GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun, and in my views. Several thoughts in response to recent posts:

-- The proof of the pudding, as the old saying goes, is in the eating. Criticism of my coverage of Glock GmbH, Glock Inc., and their products would be far better grounded it the critic had read my book. I don't mind the online banter; I'm here, afterall, essentially a guest, and I'm a big boy. I can take a verbal punch. But tarring me by association with my employer and then saying you're not going to read the book seems, well, not exactly a thoughtful response. Sorry, that's my honest opinion. Read the book and then have at it.

-- The book is not primarily or even substantially about my views on gun control. It is the story of the Glock. Naturally my views color the way I tell the story. That's inevitable. There's no such thing as pure objectivity. But it is possible for an author to tell a story in an honest way, leaving plenty of room for readers to interpret the facts as they see fit, and still have conclusions of his own. My goals are fairness, accuracy, and illumination. Even if you may disagree with this or that particular opinion I have, I think you'll enjoy and maybe even benefit from reading the book.

-- I would own a Glock if it were not so arduous to obtain a pistol permit in New York City, where I live. It's just not worth the trouble, as far as I'm concerned. I have fired Glocks of various sizes and calibers on many occasions and even in a couple of IDPA competitions. I have taken instruction from some of the best in the business--namely, Massad Ayoob and Frank DiNuzzo. (Either one of those gentlemen, by the way, can attest to my fairness and integrity.) If you're a burglar and think that because I do not own a firearm, my apartment would be easy pickings, I urge you to think again. I keep my trusty aluminum softball bat near the front door and another one in the bedroom. You will not receive a friendly welcome. (I've never had a break-in, and I've never been a crime victim, save one time when I was a teenager visiting New York. A skinny kid pulled a knife on me in the subway, and demanded my wallet. This was circa about 1978; the bad old days in NYC. I ran up the subway steps and out onto the street, and he did not follow. End of story. No heroics, no casualties. Life in the big city.)

-- As for the RKBA, I think I answered the question. I have no problem with the Supreme Court's interpretation of the Second Amendment in the Heller and McDonald cases. I recognize and respect that firearms play an enormous role in American culture. Guns happen not to be central to my everyday life, but I enjoy shooting. My wife does, too, and she happens to be a better shot than I. Finally, I have made many friends and acquaintances among gun owners and Second Amendment advocates. I am glad to have established these relationships, and I've learned a lot from these folks. One of the joys of my work is that I get to meet people deeply involved in and committed to pursuits that not necessarily central to my life. These experiences remind me how lucky I am to live in a large and varied society where, other things being equal, most people respect the Golden Rule and are content to allow others to go about their business.

All the best to The High Road crowd & Happy Holidays! Thanks for all the interest in the book.

Paul Barrett

jj1962hemi
December 23, 2011, 11:12 AM
Paul, you're a gentleman and I appreciate your engagement.

I think "America's Gun" is an apt title due to the growth and broad acceptance (60% (?) of America's LEOs use them). I'm a blue steel and walnut type of guy, but, to me, the Glock is the Toyota Camry of pistols. Solid, reliable, relatively low cost for value. America's military helped launch the Peacemaker, the 1911, then the M9 in to America. LEOs and the military, while not having ALL members being gun-savvy, tend to torture test their sidearms far more than most of us ever will. That seal of approval makes them more marketable to a weekend shooter like me.

The fact that the revolver-like nature of Glocks has become so popular a design (so quickly) is amazing to me. I surely will own one some day.

Regarding your views on RKBA, the reason it may be relevant to many of us (respecting your privacy, this is not a loyalty demand) is that everybody's narrative is informed by their opinion. I remember a poll showing that 80% of news anchors in the U.S. didn't vote for Reagan in 1980. For me, that's why Fox News (worts and all) is a valid alternative. I never see a pro-gun, pro-concealed carry feature on my local news or in the national media, although ~3% of American men are in the NRA. This certainly eclipses ACLU membership or anything else except, maybe, AARP (and I hope AMAC takes over a share of that market).

We all tend to be skeptical due to the typical media dismissal of our values, which are broadly held in our society.

Thank you very much for your engagement and friendship!

JJ

2ifbyC
December 23, 2011, 12:28 PM
Mr. Barrett:
I applaud you for taking the time and effort to explain the intent for writing your book and for addressing some of the concerns that were posted.

I have a few comments in response:

- I have come to view the media as overly liberal and have grown cynical as a result. When you are affiliated with a liberal news organization, you may be tarred with a broader brush. Fair? No, but few play fair nowadays.

- There is another axiom that states, “You can’t judge a book by its cover”. Then why is such thought given to the title of a book? One reason is that it’s like a first impression; it either intrigues you or puts you off. If it’s the latter, you are going to lose sales.

- We can agree to disagree but would you support a cause that you had ideological differences with? We have fought long and hard for our 2nd amendment rights. You have asked that we purchase your book on good faith. We asked you to disclose whether you are friend or foe. Without a money back guarantee, you had some “splaining” to do. Your answer on RKBA was tenuous at best.

Thanks again for posting; your comments allowed a deeper insight into the man behind the curtain. I too wish you and your family Happy Holidays.

ZeBool
December 23, 2011, 05:37 PM
Paul, I feel like you're skirting around the Second Amendment question. You weren't asked if you wrote anything anti-gun in the book, instead you were asked for your personal view on the issue. I would not give my money to Paul Helmke in order to read anything that he has written, so why should I support an author that is wishy-washy at best when it comes to something that I have worked hard to support? The fact that you shoot does not make you a supporter. Many celebrities have armed body guards or utilize firearms in some capacity to protect themselves, yet don't support my right to do the same. You have entered a forum dedicated to firearms/gun rights to pitch your book, yet have offered little reason as to why I should support you and buy it.

Paul Barrett
December 23, 2011, 07:05 PM
At the risk of repeating myself, let me say, thanks for all of this heartfelt interest in my book about GLOCK. I'm impressed by the commitment.

My only additional thought is that if you only buy and read books by people who you already know you agree with on every last point, then I would not risk your hard-earned money on my book. There is definitely a risk that you will find a sentence or maybe a paragraph that strikes you funny, or maybe even wrong (although I hope you won't find even a word that is factually incorrect...I vetted the manuscript with several scholarly "gun guys" to make sure I got the details right). If you don't want to buy or read a book by someone who is skeptical of the NRA as a fundraising organization that relies on scare tactics -- which doesn't, btw, give away my views on guns, the Second Amendment, or much of anything else, apart from my opinion of the NRA -- then I definitely would steer clear of my book. On the other hand, if you are a die-hard gun control advocate and do not want to read about how your movement made up phony criticisms of the Glock and pushed for restrictive laws whose effect was the opposite of what was intended, well, you should skip the book, too. I pull no punches.

For what it's worth (possibly nothing), I go out of my way to buy and read publications and books that I know I'm going to disagree with to some degree. I like to test my ideas against facts and arguments with which I'm not familiar. I admire good, honest reporting even when it is done by someone who may have voted for a different person that I did for president. Plus, it's just fun to see what everyone is saying.

Finally, if you do decide to risk $26 retail or $16 right now on preorder discount from Amazon.com, I think you'll see that my perspective is not easily categorized. My wife has diagnosed me with a syndrome she calls Oppositional Personality Disorder. I'm a skeptic of all sides. I enjoy digging out facts that contradict deeply held premises and assumptions, be they liberal, conservative or in-between. If that's the kind of guide you're looking for on a journey to examine the invention, dissemination, and popularization of the Glock pistol, well, then, hop aboard. If not, God bless, kiss your wife, pat the dog, and have a great holiday. No hard feelings here. -- Paul Barrett, author, GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun

lowerunit411
December 23, 2011, 07:09 PM
Bravo Paul...Merry Christmas

amd6547
December 23, 2011, 07:34 PM
I myself am an avid reader of opposing viewpoints.
But the ambiguous answer regarding the Second Amendment reminds me of why I am so glad to live near an excellent library, where I can read these opposing viewpoints without contributing my money to the author.
I will read this Glock book from my library.

Dr.Mall Ninja
December 23, 2011, 07:55 PM
I will read this Glock book from my library.

Me too.

Paul Barrett
December 23, 2011, 09:45 PM
I'm a huge fan of them. Please do make sure your local library orders a copy of my book, and then go read it there.

At the same time, I'm both amused and slightly alarmed by the suggestion that several people have made that they would not want to "contribute money" to an author of a book that might be worth reading but with which they might have some disagreements (maybe...who knows? ... they haven't read it yet, after all). It's a free country, and you shouldn't buy anything you don't want to buy. I'm certainly not pleading for the couple of bucks in royalties I make from the sale of each copy of the hard cover. But how would a society produce a diversity of viewpoints and investigative enterprises if everyone thought that way? I, for one, am glad to pay for both The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. The journalists at both papers are working hard and doing a good job, even if the papers have differing ideological profiles. I spent 18 years working on staff at the Journal, and I have contributed many articles to the the Times, so I know they are both worth supporting. As a reader, I trust myself to draw my own conclusions. I don't see people I may disagree with on some issues as the enemy. All that said, thanks for going to the local library and asking for GLOCK.

Onward.

Doors
December 27, 2011, 12:01 PM
I didn't know where else to post this. I met Paul on Twitter and he gave me a review copy to read and I thought I would share my review with you guys.

Glock: The Rise of America's Gun is not the work of a Glock fanboy like many of these gun books are. It is the gun version of Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World. Of course it is an historically-accurate representation of the life and times of Gaston Glock and everything GLOCK, Inc., and its line of handguns.

It is also a complete history of the Second Amendment to the US Constitution, a history of gun-related politics and policies, and also a very accurate and sober portrayal of America's love for and of guns.

In the same way you read Cod even though you're not into fish or fishing, you really should read Glock. If you're anti-gun, you'll learn both about the culture of firearms in America and how powerfull and intelligent -- savvy -- a force your enemy really is. If you're pro-gun, the Glock revolution will blow your mind, especially in contrast with how pathetically every gun manufacturer in the world performed against GLOCK, especially poor Smith & Wesson, a company that watched as GLOCK came in and single-handedly replaced every .38 Special revolver in every police station in America with not only a high-capacity, semi-automatic, magazine-fed pistol, but with a Glock 17.

I can keep on going. Each story is more amazing than the next. The chutzpah of Gaston Glock is only bettered by the cajones of his right hand man during the early days in Atlanta, Mr. Karl Walter, a man who turned the conservative and serious world of arms sales and arms dealing in America into a discoteque, into a circus, into a strip club, into a world of Hollywood action flicks, rap music videos, and an army of Glock devotees that is only bettered by those mad men and women who are obsessed with their 1911.

Let me explain why I know so much about this book and it's not even out yet. Well, I read an advanced Gally copy of the book. On November 4th, Paul Barrett contacted me to review his upcoming book, Glock: The Rise of America's Gun. He chose me because I guess I am pretty open about both my gun ownership and my attraction to Glocks. Though I have only been shooting for a year, I already have a pretty nice collection of three Glock handguns: a Generation 3 Glock 23 in .40 S&W, a 9mm First Generation Glock 17 -- the original -- a retiree from the DC police department, and my Generation 4 Glock 26, my Baby Glock, in 9mm.

So, in an exemplary blogger outreach campaign, Mr, Barrett sent me a Galley copy to read. And I read it. I consumed it and was mesmerized. I was mesmerized by how much I didn't know about these United States, about gun legislation, about gun bans and bans on high-capacity magazines. I was flabbergasted by the loopholes in these bans that were so big you could taxi a 747 through them,

I was not mesmerized by the typical fanboy depiction of their favorite gun and gun maker, I was mesmerized by a book writen by a in investigative journalist who dig into the GLOCK empire, and its ripple effects on not just Law Enforcement but popular culture, rap music, politics, television, and hundreds of movies.

I really didn't know anything about the history of firearms in America or how they're sourced and have been banned; how they're imported -- or, rather, sourced and then assembled -- and how they're marketed and sold.

And that's not even scratching the surface of all that is GLOCK, Inc, and its illustrious founder, Gaston Glock, an Austrian nerd who ended up developing, designing, and producing the most iconic pistol since the Colt 1911:

If you liked Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World, Salt: A World History, The Big Oyster: History on the Half Shell, Banana: The Fate of the Fruit That Changed the World, or Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies, you'll love Glock: The Rise of America's Gun by Paul M. Barrett.

NOTE: I removed quotes and excerpts because I know folks are funny about copyright. If you want to read the whole thing, it is on my personal blog (http://chrisabraham.com/2011/12/27/a-review-of-glock-the-rise-of-americas-gun/)

Paul Barrett
December 27, 2011, 06:19 PM
Thanks! This is great.
Paul Barrett
www.glockthebook.com

Doors
December 28, 2011, 11:44 AM
Very exciting. I can't wait to see you on the Colbert Report and hopefully on the Daily Show -- it seems like these two guys would be a perfect match for the book. Do you already know what your press schedule is? I know I would like to see your interviews on TV or listen on the radio. I could imagine you talking to Terry Gross on Fresh Air. Maybe some time with George Noory on Coast to Coast AM?

Paul Barrett
December 28, 2011, 05:38 PM
Hi, I'm the author of GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun.

In answer to the question about media appearances, I'm booked on the following NPR national shows (dates and times to follow): Fresh Air with Teri Gross, Tell Me More with Michel Martin, Marketplace, and The Takeaway with John Hochenberry. On Sunday, Jan 15, at 3pm, I'll be on Gun Talk Radio with Tom Gresham. I'm also going to participate in an authors' forum at SHOT Show in Las Vegas January 19 (sponsored by 5.11 Tactical). Lots of good stuff, and I'll post more info when the calendar is complete in a few days. You can also check my website for updates: www.glockthebook.com.

Meanwhile, I'm eager to discuss the book online. And you can order it at a nice discount for delivery Jan 10 here:
http://www.amazon.com/Glock-Americas-Paul-M-Barrett/dp/0307719936/ref=sr_1_6?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1308165826&sr=1-6

I'd also like to invite members of this web forum to upcoming book parties -- one in New York and one in Washington DC.

Jan 10 (Tues) @ 7pm at Book Court, 163 Court Street, Brooklyn, NY (in the heart of Cobble Hill)

AND
Feb 4 (Sat) @ 6 pm at Politics & Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave., NW, Washington DC

Friends, colleagues, and readers right off the street will be gathering to discuss GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun and lift a glass and have nosh. Please join Julie and me and all our wonderful pals at these two outstanding independent book stores.

All best & Happy New Year,
Paul Barrett
Author, GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun

FIVETWOSEVEN
December 28, 2011, 09:44 PM
1911 is still America's gun, I've seen far more 1911s then Glocks at the shooting range. You can keep that unergonomic Block, I'll take my XD over it.

OARNGESI
December 28, 2011, 10:47 PM
id like to get a copy but is there somewhere we can get a signed copy

Paul Barrett
December 29, 2011, 09:46 AM
Thanks for asking about getting a signed copy of my new book about GLOCK.

One way to do this is to come to one of my live book events. The first one is January 10 (Tues) @ 7pm at Book Court, a lovely store in the Cobble Hill Section of Brooklyn. The street address is 163 Court Street. All welcome.

If you're going to SHOT Show in Las Vegas, I will participate in an authors' forum sponsored by 5.11 Tactical on Thursday January 19 at 2:30pm in the Venetian Hotel. Details will be available at the show.

If you're not traveling but are determined to get my name scribbled in your book -- and God bless you for your enthusiasm! -- we can arrange to do this long distance. Send me an email at pmb32861@yahoo.com with your US mail address. I'll email you back with the details. You'll end up paying no more than what you'd pay at Barnes & Noble (about $26 list).

The least expensive and fastest way to get a copy of GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun is to click over to Amazon.com right now and "pre-order" at the 40% discount they're offering. They will deliver Jan 10, the official pub date. That won't have my signature, but you'll save a few bucks.

Here's the link:
http://www.amazon.com/Glock-Americas-Paul-M-Barrett/dp/0307719936

Thanks for your interest and for reading!

All best,
Paul Barrett
www.glockthebook.com

Paul Barrett
December 29, 2011, 09:49 AM
1911 is still America's gun, I've seen far more 1911s then Glocks at the shooting range. You can keep that unergonomic Block, I'll take my XD over it.
Acknowledging that GLOCK is a phenomenon worth understanding does not require you to renounce your loyalty to the 1911! Read GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun to find out why. The "simple gun for simple people" line strikes me as gratuitously snarky. No one is questioning the contributions that the 1911 has made, nor its continued popularity. Onward! -- Paul Barrett, Author, GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun

Ragnar Danneskjold
December 29, 2011, 10:49 AM
American sales made Glock the company they are today. Most police departments use them, they are one of the very few guns cited by name in music and movies, and the average American who knows nothing of guns can tell you what a Glock is if asked. The same cannot be said of the 1911 or any other pistol. Calling Glock America's gun is not a stretch. The year is 2011, not 1911. Times change.

FIVETWOSEVEN
December 29, 2011, 11:23 AM
Acknowledging that GLOCK is a phenomenon worth understanding does not require you to renounce your loyalty to the 1911! Read GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun to find out why. The "simple gun for simple people" line strikes me as gratuitously snarky. No one is questioning the contributions that the 1911 has made, nor its continued popularity. Onward! -- Paul Barrett, Author, GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun

I don't even own a 1911. Glocks did start selling fast but now more companies are putting out their own poly pistols and people are buying those as well. Calling something like Glock as America's gun doesn't seem right. It should be the gun that other countries identify us with.

Ragnar Danneskjold
December 29, 2011, 11:32 AM
Glocks did start selling fast but now more companies are putting out their own poly pistols and people are buying those as well.

What's something that most cities, counties, and states in the entire country have, who buy guns by the shipping container? Police departments. Most of them use Glock. That's a pretty big drop on the bucket, and it certainly outweighs a 100 year old pistol the single biggest buyer (the US military) hasn't used for 20 something years.

Baba Louie
December 30, 2011, 08:08 AM
Good on ya Paul.

One heck of a story to be told truthfully. Looking forward to reading it. As Chivers did with the AK story in THE GUN, I'm sure your book will illuminate the "passion" (both pos & neg?) that came about due to Herr Glock's 17th patent design.

Simply reading the comments here and on other boards concerning this announcement, is illuminating unto itself, in a manner of speaking.

Now if someone would only write the simple story of Cerberus' or Freedom Group buying up arms and ammo makers left and right recently, putting it into context we can either understand from a financial POV or from a 2A POV (USA centric?), good, bad or ugly... is it a horrible conspiracy to (gasp) have Corporate America running the show putting all the eggs in one basket? (Yes I read your piece at BBW last year) ;)

Any way, looking forward to your "G" book to add to the collection.

FIVETWOSEVEN
December 30, 2011, 01:01 PM
What's something that most cities, counties, and states in the entire country have, who buy guns by the shipping container? Police departments. Most of them use Glock. That's a pretty big drop on the bucket, and it certainly outweighs a 100 year old pistol the single biggest buyer (the US military) hasn't used for 20 something years.

Turning in your old duty gear to buy a new Glock at around $150 is really economical and PDs jump on it.

Paul Barrett
December 30, 2011, 03:14 PM
Good on ya Paul.

One heck of a story to be told truthfully. Looking forward to reading it. As Chivers did with the AK story in THE GUN, I'm sure your book will illuminate the "passion" (both pos & neg?) that came about due to Herr Glock's 17th patent design.

Simply reading the comments here and on other boards concerning this announcement, is illuminating unto itself, in a manner of speaking.

Now if someone would only write the simple story of Cerberus' or Freedom Group buying up arms and ammo makers left and right recently, putting it into context we can either understand from a financial POV or from a 2A POV (USA centric?), good, bad or ugly... is it a horrible conspiracy to (gasp) have Corporate America running the show putting all the eggs in one basket? (Yes I read your piece at BBW last year) ;)

Any way, looking forward to your "G" book to add to the collection.
Baba Louie:
I can shed some light on the Cerberus roll-up in the gun industry. I've written about the situation for Bloomberg Businessweek (yes, that Bloomberg...2A people may not like Mayor Mike, my employer, but he owns the best business magazine on the planet). Here are articles:
http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/10_33/b4191041673261.htm
http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/10_45/b4202025114499.htm

Beyond those two articles, I can say that I don't see any corporate conspiracy to round up the gun industry and do it harm. (There's been a laughable rumor in gun circles about George Soros being behind Freedom Group. Uh, no, Soros has nothing to do with Cerberus -- just because they're big Wall Street players does not make them the same entity.) Cerberus thought it saw an opportunity to buy a bunch of small companies (a roll-up) and squeeze out costs (layoffs, factory shut-downs) and then sell the whole thing off in an IPO. So far, the IPO has not happened, suggesting that this has not been a rewarding investment to date for Cerberus. But who knows? Freedom Group has not been terribly forthcoming. I do know there have been layoffs.

All best,
Paul Barrett
www.glockthebook.com

Paul Barrett
January 21, 2012, 04:44 PM
Mark Keefe IV, editor of American Rifleman, in today's Washington Post

http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/books/book-review-glock-the-rise-of-americas-gun-by-paul-barrett/2011/12/15/gIQAAwQUEQ_story.html

bergmen
January 21, 2012, 09:59 PM
...yesterday. It is still soaking in and I am letting everything settle a bit before doing any sort of comprehensive post on the book.

I will say, however, that in my opinion Paul is an exceptional author and the book is very well written. It is obvous that a tremendous amount of research went into the composition of the book and the book does an outstanding job of pulling highly diverse subject matters together to portay a very complex subject in terms that allow the reader to connect the dots in a fairly straghtforward manner.

Incidentally, Paul's views of the NRA throughout the book parallel my own very closely. Even as a life member, I have concerns about their approach to RKBA. I don't need to elaborate here other than to indicate that I think Paul is right on the mark.

I began to get concerned when I got a few pages into chapter 19 "The Impact of the Austrian Pistol: Good for America?". I have a personal premise that I believe is important to consider when thinking of firearms and crime:

The possession of a firearm is not a causal factor in the commission of a gun related crime, it is supplemental and incidental to it.

It is specifically a matter of choice of the perpetrator to commit the crime, the firearm only being a tool to assist in facilitating the crime. Removing the gun from a murderous individual still leaves society with a murderous individual who can easily move to knives, baseball bats, claw hammers, machetes or any other inanimate object to threaten, kill or injure the victim.

Gun control laws only effect law abiding citizens since by the very nature of the acts of criminals, far more serious laws are already at risk of being broken when lethal force is being applied or contemplated. How can a mere gun control law be any sort of a deterrent?

Gun control laws are indicators of the implicit mistrust by the government of law abiding citizens since the lawless will not abide by them anyway.

It is impossible to control the actions of individuals by attempting to control inanimate objects that are incidental to the commission of lethal crimes. The result of draconian laws (such as those in Chicago or New York City) have the adverse effect of a disarmed law abiding populace providing a landscape of defenseless victims that cannot fight back in the face of lethal threats.

High capacity magazines and the firearms that use them should not be indicted as a facilitator of highly publicised mass killings by crazed perpetrators. It is the nutcase pulling the trigger that is the only causal factor in these crimes.

There is far more to this than what I have described here but the foundation of this premise is important in light of the roll of weapons in lethal crimes.

Dan

FIVETWOSEVEN
January 21, 2012, 10:50 PM
and it certainly outweighs a 100 year old pistol the single biggest buyer (the US military) hasn't used for 20 something years.

Like the Marine Expeditionary Unit? Oh wait, they use Kimber 1911s designated the M45. That is their issue sidearm. I've seen a few departments replace their Glocks with something else. As I recall, the NH State Police used Glocks for a few years and then replaced them with the S&W M&P.

Fishslayer
January 22, 2012, 02:01 AM
In answer to the question about media appearances, I'm booked on the following NPR national shows


Indeed...:cool:

NinjaFeint
January 22, 2012, 02:09 AM
Late to the party, I just grabbed it on my Kindle. Time to read

Ragnar Danneskjold
January 22, 2012, 02:45 AM
Like the Marine Expeditionary Unit? Oh wait, they use Kimber 1911s designated the M45.

Actually, it's just their Force Recon guys that use the M45. That's few hundred M45s to the hundreds of thousands+ M9s that are issued to the rest of the regular US military. If you were trying to make a point about the popularity of the 1911 in the current US military, I think you missed it.

RoyRogers
January 22, 2012, 03:04 AM
I purchased the hardcover through Amazon last week. The author reveals his unenlightened bias toward disarming Americans. Also disappointing is his failure to include photos and diagrams, with the exception of a single drawing of a pistol--lazy writing.

Paul Barrett
January 22, 2012, 06:03 AM
First, thank you all, again, for your interest in the book and your (mostly) thoughtful comments.

In reverse order...

The notion that I favor disarming anyone (other than criminals and the insane) simply cannot be derived from my book, GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun. That's a smear, pure and simple, one beneath the generally high standards of this website.

Bergmen's long post strikes me as well worth discussion. I appreciate his positive assessment of the book, of course. Thank you. I am intrigued that a Life Member of NRA shares my generally skeptical view of NRA. The question of whether NRA best serves the interests of gun owners with its never-ending culture war is well worth discussing. I am not suggesting that everything NRA says is wrong. The organization's focus on criminals, rather than the tools criminals use, deserves respect. Crime is the main problem, not guns. But I am often struck that so many intelligent gun owners fail to ask whether NRA's perpetual state of panic may be more of a cynical fundraising technique than a serious assessment of political and social reality. In any event, it's a complex topic, and one that deserves calm discussion among people who are not afraid to disagree on some points so that they might find common ground on others.

Btw, I highly recommend a review of my book published in the Washington Post and written by NRA's Mark Keefe IV, editor-in-chief of American Rifleman, NRA's flagship publication. Here's a link --

http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/books/book-review-glock-the-rise-of-americas-gun-by-paul-barrett/2011/12/15/gIQAAwQUEQ_story.html

In the spirit of civil discourse, all the best...

Paul Barrett
Author, GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun

2ifbyC
January 22, 2012, 01:00 PM
Mr. Barrett:

The way you phrase your skepticism of the NRA depicts a negative bias that can easily be translated by some as a desire for disarmament. After all, the NRA is our ultimate defender for the right to bear arms. Your short tenure on this forum to promote your book does not entitle you to cite the “high standards” of the forum to chastise a member’s opinion for whom you disagree.

I point to two sentences in your post for illustration: “The question of whether NRA best serves the interests of gun owners with its NEVER-ENDING CULTURE WAR is well worth discussing.” “But I am often struck that so many intelligent gun owners fail to ask whether NRA's PERPETUAL STATE OF PANIC may be more of a CYNICAL FUNDRAISING TECHNIQUE than a serious assessment of political and social reality.” Loading your queries in a negative light and then asking for a calm discussion is oxymoronic.

Fact is, America is in a culture war and there is no leadership to bring us together. The standing ovations the Gingrich received last week is symptomatic of the frustration and anger over the direction America is taking. The actions evoked by the NRA are a “serious assessment of political and social reality”. I am surprised a man of your intellect can not see this.

Baba Louie
January 22, 2012, 01:18 PM
The question of whether NRA best serves the interests of gun owners with its never-ending culture war is well worth discussing. I am not suggesting that everything NRA says is wrong. The organization's focus on criminals, rather than the tools criminals use, deserves respect. Crime is the main problem, not guns. But I am often struck that so many intelligent gun owners fail to ask whether NRA's perpetual state of panic may be more of a cynical fundraising technique than a serious assessment of political and social reality.Would be a book or two unto itself truth be told. Depending on your slant it could be a good read or a vicious slanted political backstabbing expose... based on your POV. I recall Harlan Carter, Cincinnati and later Neal Knox, Mr Heston and all that fal-der-ral. Was not pretty. But it did set the tone for where we are today. Self preservation and power struggles are nasty things perhaps and Washington DC costs money no matter how you slice the pie.

(enough on that from moi, back to original thread direction)

Book is queued up but have a few in line ahead of it to read first.

amd6547
January 22, 2012, 01:19 PM
The story of the Glock is a perfect illustration of why gun owners and the NRA are always ready to push the panic button in defense of the 2nd amendment.
The mainstream media was filling column inches and broadcast minutes with scare pieces about the "plastic gun that could go through metal detectors"...which was obviously, patently false....the Glock was nearly banned because of this.
In my lifetime, I have seen many such media driven anti gun issues which were used to drive gun banning.

FIVETWOSEVEN
January 22, 2012, 01:30 PM
Actually, it's just their Force Recon guys that use the M45. That's few hundred M45s to the hundreds of thousands+ M9s that are issued to the rest of the regular US military. If you were trying to make a point about the popularity of the 1911 in the current US military, I think you missed it.

Actually You said that they haven't used it in over 20 years and I contradicted you. Doesn't matter how many there are in service. I wasn't making a point about popularity but the fact that some of what could be considered the Elite still use it.

we are not amused
January 22, 2012, 04:02 PM
Just bought the book yesterday, along with three others, may be a week or two before I get it read.
Thumbing through it, it looks like a good read, the lack of pictures is not a particular drawback as I can read, and if I want a picture of a Glock, I can find a lot of them.
Right now, I've got Mark Levin's Ameritopia, to read, then Larry Correia's Spellbound, and maybe Robert Conroy's Himmler's War, although I might bump Paul Barrett's book up in it's place. (The reason I have a specific order is if I didn't, I would be trying to read all four at once, I can be a very undisciplined reader.)If I was on vacation, I could rip through all four in about a week, being we are currently working 10 hour days and 6 day weeks, it may be a couple of weeks.

rust collector
January 22, 2012, 04:23 PM
Because it looks to be well-researched and doesn't attempt to be politically correct. I respect integrity in a writer even if we don't agree on every position.

One bittersweet aspect of the publication business is that any writer that hopes to do well must cater to the 800 lb gorilla. Just as Glock changed the landscape and made good money, Mr Barrett's success in this market revolves around Amazon. That's not his fault, but I hope there is room in the future for the sweet little bookstores in out of the way places.

SleazyRider
January 23, 2012, 08:57 AM
I purchased the hardcover through Amazon last week. The author reveals his unenlightened bias toward disarming Americans. Also disappointing is his failure to include photos and diagrams, with the exception of a single drawing of a pistol--lazy writing.
Funny, I must have missed that point entirely. Could you enlighten me as to the page or passage?

Paul Barrett
January 23, 2012, 09:52 AM
I agree 100% about the neighborhood store. We had the launch event for GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun in the indie store around the corner from where I live. It was a lovely event, filled with friends and even some genuine customers off the street. CSpan was there to tape it for their BookTV show (check their website for airings), and we lifted a glass to books and civil discourse. The store, btw, is Book Court, 163 Court Street in Brooklyn. If you stop by, you might see me there with my wife and dachsuhund.

parsimonious_instead
January 23, 2012, 09:55 AM
I can vouch - I was there at the Brooklyn premiere. Large crowd with some great questions... It really is a good store, the sort of bookstore that's all but disappeared in a lot of communities, unfortunately.

NinjaFeint
January 23, 2012, 12:30 PM
Because it looks to be well-researched and doesn't attempt to be politically correct. I respect integrity in a writer even if we don't agree on every position..

This

So far I've found it to be well written and I have enjoyed reading it. I don't live in a world where anyone agrees 100% with my views on almost anything, so I don't require it from the author to enjoy the book.

reloader-1
January 23, 2012, 01:50 PM
I am absolutely amazed at how many people are at odds with the subtitle, "The Rise of America's Gun"

The author is not stating that this is an American gun, or that it is from America. It is "America's Gun". For example, the most popular cars sold in the US are the Toyota Camry, Honda Accord, Toyota Corolla, and Honda Civic, in that order. What is "America's car"? It would probably be a 4-door Japanese-marque vehicle (whether made in the US or Japan).

Glocks have sold an huge amount of firearms over the last 30 years, and have penetrated the American market thoroughly. In a lot of areas, the word Glock is synonymous with "handgun", and the mere fact that the Springfield XD or the S&W M&P or a myriad other guns are sold is due in large part to the success of the polymer-frame Glock.

Now, on to the author's second point, about the RKBA and the NRA. I am a diehard 2nd Amendment advocate, with NO restrictions or laws regarding firearms being my ultimate goal. That being the case, I am completely in agreement with Mr. Barrett regarding the NRA's constant panic mode. It is a very common fundraising tactic, one used by dozens of agencies ("little Paul will starve within the next two weeks if you don't send $20 RIGHT NOW", or "the salmon will not return to spawn if you don't send $50 IMMEDIATELY to build fish ladders", or "these ungodless heathens will perish eternally if you do not contribute $100 AT ONCE to send them missionaries" etc, etc.)

I, for one, am sick of it. Announce your accomplishments, itemize your expenses, treat me like an adult, and I will send money. Otherwise, I'll consider other venues for my hard earned dollar (or euro, ruble, kronor, etc).

Paul, full disclosure - I have not read your book, but I will do so in the near future.

My first firearm was a Glock.

bergmen
January 23, 2012, 03:43 PM
^^^ +2. I think you will enjoy the book.

Dan

NinjaFeint
January 23, 2012, 05:25 PM
I thought the title fit the book. I am intrigued by fish ladders now...where do I send my money?

hnk45acp
January 23, 2012, 06:21 PM
Hello and Welcome Paul from a fellow NYC dweller.
You should realize that writing anything on guns is political and while I admire your attempt to keep politics out of the story, I think that it's just not possible.

Does the NRA use scare tactics? Yes but as most folks in the gun community knows it's not quite unfounded just look at Fast & Furious' use of straw purchasers to justify compliance letters. The whole "dey took ur guns!" refrain does get tiresome and most members tend to block out these "cry wolf" alerts but the NRA has almost 4 million grassroots members that vote with a pretty singular voice and that's why the NRA is to be respected if not feared.

I also find it ironic that you are for limiting capacity when that was one of the main features that the Glock had that caused it's rise in popularity. It's like writing about drag racing and bemoaning the gobs of horsepower involved.

and finally: "-- I would own a Glock if it were not so arduous to obtain a pistol permit in New York City, where I live. It's just not worth the trouble, as far as I'm concerned."

If the hurdles were for voting, praying, painting, writing, etc. would you be quite so indifferent? Get your permit and we'll go shooting sometime. I'll even let you shoot my 1911 even though she's very insulted by your book title.

flatlander937
January 23, 2012, 08:18 PM
I thought the title fit the book. I am intrigued by fish ladders now...where do I send my money?

x2... I had to google that just to see if it was a real thing... I had a quite humorous picture in my head:p



Back on topic... the book sounds interesting... I do not like Glocks as they don't fit my hand well at all(admittedly I haven't shot one yet to know for sure if I'm OK with it or not though)... but I am interested in the history of any kind of firearm and it sounds like a very well written book.

Paul Barrett
January 24, 2012, 11:42 AM
I, too, live in a world where reasonable people disagree and, occasionally, benefit from hearing other opinions. Sometimes, I even change one of my opinions when I'm presented with compelling facts I had not considered previously. It's a fun experience.

Thanks to all who are reading my book - GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun - with clear eyes and an open mind. Very much appreciated. -- Paul Barrett

GCMkc
January 24, 2012, 06:00 PM
I, too, live in a world where reasonable people disagree and, occasionally, benefit from hearing other opinions. Sometimes, I even change one of my opinions when I'm presented with compelling facts I had not considered previously. It's a fun experience.

Thanks to all who are reading my book - GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun - with clear eyes and an open mind. Very much appreciated. -- Paul Barrett

Just listening to your segment on NPR's Fresh Air. I really enjoyed it and hopefully will get a chance to pick up the book.

BamaBarrister
January 24, 2012, 07:49 PM
I read the book and enjoyed it very much. To the author's credit, I did not perceive the book as overly biased or political. It is primarily the story of a product and the company that produced the product. Of course, since the product is firearms it was all the more interesting to me (a Glock owner myself). Even if you are gun owner not partial to Glocks, you would likely enjoy this book. Obviously, you cannot write a book about guns without wading into the area of Second Amendment and gun control politics. In my opinion, Barrett does a commendable job of addressing both sides. Yes, he offers criticism of the NRA (but so do many regular loyal posters of THR), but he also points out examples where the anti-gun groups and press have been downright misleading or wrong. While I disagree with some of his positions (e.g. limiting magazine capacity), I rarely read a book where agree 100% with the author. This book does not come close to promoting total disarmament as some have suggested. If anything, he acknowledges that firearms are in ingrained in American history and culture and that this would never work in the U.S. All in all, a good read.

Shear_stress
January 24, 2012, 08:02 PM
Just listening to your segment on NPR's Fresh Air. I really enjoyed it and hopefully will get a chance to pick up the book.

I heard the interview as well. Mr. Barrett did a real service to gunowners by:

1.) Debunking any lingering paranoia that the Glock can somehow "pass through metal detectors"

2.) Not taking the bait about the tragic shooting of Gabrielle Giffords and explaining that her own gun ownership is representative of the growing acceptance of guns in the US

3.) Calmly and rationally deflating the main argument of gun control advocates by stating that the US violent crime rate continues to decline despite the sunset of the "assault weapons ban" and the steadily increasing numbers of guns in lawful hands

4.) Referring to the byzantine process of legally getting a handgun in NYC as "too difficult". Remember, this a reporter from Bloomberg

5.) Depicting gun ownership in a positive way by sharing his own experience with learning how to shoot in which he had to unlearn bad habits picked up from TV and movies

Sgt_R
January 25, 2012, 05:23 AM
Just finished reading this thread and the Washington post review (http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/books/book-review-glock-the-rise-of-americas-gun-by-paul-barrett/2011/12/15/gIQAAwQUEQ_story.html). Plan to listen to the NPR interview (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=639442) when I get off work. I expect I'll be ordering my copy of GLOCK later this evening.

R

Fish Miner
January 25, 2012, 10:40 AM
I just heard the NPR interview the other day on my lunch break. Actually stayed in the car so I could hear the whole thing. Great interview- not what I expected from NPR. I thought it would have a very liberal slant or agenda to it, but the interview was great. I don't have a Glock, but I do have a bit more knowledge now. Good job to the author

Cosmoline
January 25, 2012, 02:06 PM
Mr. Barrett got Terry Gross to talk about shooting a .22 when she was a girl. I never thought I'd hear that.

He's not an advocate for a political position, but I think the balanced presentation of well-researched facts tends to favor our side of the debate.

Beyond that, it's a textbook example of how to break into a new and reluctant market. I'd be interested to compare Glock with H&K in this respect. Both are European pistol makers, but while Glock has been incredibly responsive to consumer needs stateside, H&K acts like you should be lucky to be able to buy anything they make.

But then again Glock hasn't done as well penetrating US military and federal agency contracts.

Should be an interesting book.

Hacker15E
January 25, 2012, 03:04 PM
I am absolutely amazed at how many people are at odds with the subtitle, "The Rise of America's Gun"

The author is not stating that this is an American gun, or that it is from America. It is "America's Gun". For example, the most popular cars sold in the US are the Toyota Camry, Honda Accord, Toyota Corolla, and Honda Civic, in that order. What is "America's car"? It would probably be a 4-door Japanese-marque vehicle (whether made in the US or Japan).

So, you are stating that Glock is the "most popular" firearm maker in the United States, and that is what warrants it being called "America's Gun"?

I think you'd have a hard time proving that, first of all, and second, there are other firearms that are much better suited for the title of "America's Gun".

Despite Mr Barrett's explanation earlier in the thread (and completely separate from the merits of the book itself), I still think it's a ridiculously poor choice for a title.

Cheytac
January 25, 2012, 04:37 PM
RoyRogers, What book were you reading. He in no way leans towards disarming Americans.

Sgt_R
January 25, 2012, 04:48 PM
I enjoyed the NPR interview. Honestly, that was some of the most even-handed firearms related reporting I've ever heard on that network (unlike some here I usually like NPR, even though I don't necessarily agree with their typical bias on many issues).

Well done, Paul. You've sold me a book.

R

gfanikf
January 25, 2012, 04:49 PM
I agree 100% about the neighborhood store. We had the launch event for GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun in the indie store around the corner from where I live. It was a lovely event, filled with friends and even some genuine customers off the street. CSpan was there to tape it for their BookTV show (check their website for airings), and we lifted a glass to books and civil discourse. The store, btw, is Book Court, 163 Court Street in Brooklyn. If you stop by, you might see me there with my wife and dachsuhund.
Mr. Barrett,

I had a chance to listen to your interview on NPR and I really look forward to reading the Kindle Edition on my commute home. I would have loved to get a physical copy, but nature of the commute.

Funny enough your event was right near where my wife and I used to live. I still work in NYC, but alas we wanted a little more room for our new daughter. Ironically if I hadn't moved back to PA, I'd most likely never be on this board. I had looked into trying to fire a handgun at a range in NYC, let alone own one, I think it's easy to win the lottery.

I really want to thank you for writing this as I've often wondered how did Glock just take over the US LE market, I mean it's almost unheard of how they captured the market. The problem is until this book, no one seemed to talk about it in detail beyond a forum post. This book was exactly what I wanted to exist(like the book on Doom and the founding of ID Software), but never figured it would. I'm not even someone who likes Glocks (but I respect them for what they over and achieved). Detailed and well researched.

Oh quick question did you use to work for BW, before the sale to Bloomberg? If so I'll explain in a PM (even if you didn't I will)

Regarding the title I think it's actually pretty apt, especially when I saw the Glock SoL gun, R. Lee Emery spokemen, the widespread ownership, it makes a lot of sense. I mean just like citizens of foreign countries can become quintessential Americans, so can a gun.

Hacker15E
January 25, 2012, 07:09 PM
Another word of 'thanks' for the NPR interview. Nice job.

NinjaFeint
January 25, 2012, 08:07 PM
RoyRogers, What book were you reading. He in no way leans towards disarming Americans.
That is his only post on this website

ol' scratch
January 26, 2012, 12:13 PM
First, thanks for the interest in my book. Much appreciated.

No need for devotees of the venerable 1911 to take offense at my subtitle. I have great respect for the 1911's historic role. "The Rise of America's Gun" indicates that Glock became the iconic handgun of the late 20th century when Americans (cops, civilians, movie directors) adopted the Austrian pistol as their own. I chose the words carefully. I did not call it an "American Gun." On many levels, the Glock became America's Gun.

To those who have posted positive reactions to the uncorrected galley proof, my thanks! The final version of the book will be released Jan 10, 2012 (with typos fixed). You can preorder a copy right now, at a fat discount, from Amazon.com. I'd appreciate pre-orders, because they signal demand, and that signal ripples back through Amazon to my publisher, Crown. The more early demand, the more likely Crown will do a second printing more quickly.

If you are a serious blogger or freqent poster to firearm websites (or any websites, for that matter), I can arrange for you to gain online access to the galley. To make that arrangement with Crown, I will need a personal email. Send to me at pmb32861@yahoo.com. You have to commit to writing a review and getting it around. This isn't supposed to be a way to score a freebie.:)

Thanks and all the best,
Paul Barrett
www.glockthebook.com
I heard your interview on NPR. Very nice interview. It is sad that you can't own the firearm you want in NYC and you have to travel to the desert to shoot.

ol' scratch
January 26, 2012, 12:30 PM
1911 is still America's gun, I've seen far more 1911s then Glocks at the shooting range. You can keep that unergonomic Block, I'll take my XD over it.
This really isn't a book about how great Glock is. It is a book about the history of Glock and the pistol's effect on pop culture. There are plenty of books about the 1911 and how influential John Browning was to the development of many firearms. By the way, I am speaking to you from the perspective of a huge 1911 fanatic who can't stand to shoot a Glock.

NYC Shoots
January 26, 2012, 07:21 PM
I have read with interest comments about Paul Barrett's views on NRA, and RTKBA.

Let me offer a perspective from one who probably knows more about his writing on gun issues than most who have posted on this forum.

I lived in NYC for 18 years. Part of that time was spent running (as an unpaid volunteer) educational shooting events for opinion leaders in the NYC major market press. The events were run on weekends at a range near NYC and they consisted of an NRA FIRST Steps pistol course, a Q & A session on gun laws, explanation of firearms technology that confuse media (e.g. "assualt rifle" falacies), a look at NY and NJ gun laws, and much more. The intent was to provide media with an education experience, live fire, a chance to meet gun owners including NJ's champion shooters, factual information on gun ownership, and establish ourselves as sources should a journalist need information.

Mr. Barrett was among many journalists who were invited because he was covering the gun industry for the Wall Street Journal with a more junior writer and colleage named Vanessa. (I forgot her last name.) You would think that this opportunity (especially the live fire) would interest anyone who covered the gun industry as regularly as Mr. Barrett. Unhappily, however, he declined to attend each and every time we invited him and often did not return phone calls or even RSVP to written invitations. In contrast, Vanessa did attend as well as many other writers from the WSJ and other media outlets.

Mr. Barrett's coverage of the lawsuits against the industry were more troubling than his lack of open mindedness towards getting a free and fun education on guns. Many of his articles had subtle and sometimes blatant bias, and they reeked of a man with anti gun agenda. His articles appeared during the "post Columbine Clinton era" where our Second Amendment rights were at no greater risk. As memory serves me, one article that made the front page, "Six Who made a Differerence", undescored his disdain for Jim Baker at NRA and NRA's tremendous influence at stopping anti-gun legislation.

His coverage was in fact so cleverly biased against gun makers and NRA that a senior person at the WSJ asked a senior member of the NSSF if he thought Mr. Barrett was "fair." During that same meeting, a senior member of an organization I will not name said that "Paul impressed me as having an agenda and would some day write a book on the gun industry." Funny how correct that prediction turned out to be.

Now, in 2012, Mr. Barrett wants to sell books to people who support an industry he showed bias against while writing for the WSJ. He even made it to the SHOT Show this month to promote his book not knowing that many remember him more clearly that he may desire.

I asked a friend at Glock what he thought about the book. His response was that nobody at Glock would talk to him, so he became angry and interviewed people who had been fired from Glock to get "dirt". My friend also said that there were many material inaccuracies in the book.

Will I read the book? Yes, but not buy it. Mr. Barrett may have become more fair minded about guns since he wrote those biased articles years ago, but the more likely scenario is that he is acting opportunistically to befriend people who he would strip of their gun rights if given the chance.

For a read on Glock from a fair-minded reporter that actually flew to Austria to meet Gaston Glock and his family, see this 2003 article in Forbes magazine that Mr. Barrett surely used as a source for his book. Here's the link. http://www.forbes.com/global/2003/0331/020.html

SleazyRider
January 26, 2012, 07:40 PM
That's a pretty powerful accusation, backed up by mere hearsay, from a one-time poster. Mr. Barrett's writing speaks for itself, be it gun control or Gaston Glock. I'm far from an apologist for him, but his ample footnotes and references suggest a highly objective and open minded approach to a very controversial subject. I suggest you follow his example with your rebuttal.

In the meantime, it sounds like sour grapes because he didn't attend your party.

Hacker15E
January 26, 2012, 08:42 PM
I'm interested to see Mr. Barrett's response, as he has obviously been reading THR and this thread.

Reminder to both: there's a reason this forum is named what it is. Let's keep it civil, factual, and leave the ad hominem out of it, regardless of your position.

Paul Barrett
January 27, 2012, 09:01 AM
I am traveling and will respond in full this evening.
I am tempted to say nothing and let this blast of ad hominem hostility speak for itself.
But since THR has asked me to answer, I will do so.
No need to remind me to be civil. That's my m.o. My critic's use of personal smear and insult, by contrast, are surely beneath the dignity of this website. The instinct to employ that style of argument reveals a great deal about the critic and ought to raise immediate doubts about the substance of his verbal assault.
All best,
Paul Barrett
Author, GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun

NYC Shoots
January 27, 2012, 12:54 PM
You need to read my post again. I do not attack Mr. Barrett's current book other than to say at least one person at Glock felt it had material inaccuracies.

My comments simply relate to his writing on the gun industry while at the WSJ. You should read those articles and form your own opinions before you criticise me.

Read ll his articles than draw your own conclusions as to whether he was biased at that point in his career.

Birch Knoll
January 27, 2012, 12:59 PM
Read ll his articles than draw your own conclusions as to whether he was biased at that point in his career.

Do you have any links for said articles?

NinjaFeint
January 27, 2012, 03:13 PM
You need to read my post again. I do not attack Mr. Barrett's current book other than to say at least one person at Glock felt it had material inaccuracies.

My comments simply relate to his writing on the gun industry while at the WSJ. You should read those articles and form your own opinions before you criticise me.

Read ll his articles than draw your own conclusions as to whether he was biased at that point in his career.

So I am supposed to be angry that he is more fair minded now?

Also, did you register just to bash this book/author?

Birch Knoll
January 27, 2012, 03:14 PM
So I am supposed to be angry that he is more fair minded now?

Heh.

Sgt_R
January 27, 2012, 03:23 PM
I do not attack Mr. Barrett's current book other than to say at least one person at Glock felt it had material inaccuracies.

My comments simply relate to his writing on the gun industry while at the WSJ. You should read those articles and form your own opinions before you criticise me.

Can you cite a credible, independent source for these accusations (such as an on-the-record interview with the "one person" at Glock, or links to Mr. Barrett's past articles), or should we just take your word for it?

Also, did you register just to bash this book/author?

That's pretty much what it looks like to me.

R

armarsh
January 27, 2012, 08:25 PM
I just finished the book. All in all, a good read. I think the author's possible anti RKBA is overblown.

One area that I did not like was the the depiction of Ruby Ridge: "In August 1992, FBI agents and deputy US marshals faced off against a family of gun-trafficking white extremists at Ruby Ridge, Idaho."

Our government ended up paying damages to Randy Weaver, his children, and Kevin Harris. Basically everyone involved that the FBI did not kill were compensated. FBI sniper Lon Horiuchi narrowly escaped prosecution for manslaughter.

In short, I thought you could have been a little more fair.

Paul Barrett
January 28, 2012, 05:21 PM
Hello, THR people. Back from a reporting trip to one of my favorite cities, Pittsburgh, and I'm rested up and ready to get into the discussion here.

I don't know the identity of the anonymous commenter whose shooting sessions I impolitely did not attend back in the late 1990s. All I can say at this point, 13 or 14 years later, is that I wish I had gone, both because it was not my intent to hurt anyone's feelings, and because I'm sure I would have had fun. I enjoy shooting. I enjoyed it then. I did some shooting in that era (for example with Mas Ayoob, who, at the time, was based in New Hampshire, and at the Smith & Wesson Academy in western Massachusetts). But I think it's worth noting that I worked for a daily newspaper, and I had responsibilities as a legal affairs reporter that went beyond covering the gun industry. Instead of shooting at these events, I was probably interviewing boring corporate lawyers or poring over court records of a lawsuit concerning some busted-up merger. That's the way it goes sometimes.

As for the quality of my work at The Wall Street Journal, I'm sure it was not perfect. Read it and judge for yourself. I'm sure that my writing about guns, gun owners, and the gun industry has improved with time (I sure hope so!), and at this point I'd prefer that people just read my book about Glock and evaluate it on its own terms. The proof of the pudding is in the eating, as the old saying goes, not in the unsubstantiated complaints about articles written more than a dozen years earlier. But by all means, read it all, and let me know what you think.

Finally, on the notion that some unnamed person at Glock has found an error in the book, please point out said error, and I'll consider whether a fix is needed for future editions. I'm unaware of any material errors. I vetted the manuscript with a number of wise old sages from the gun industry, and I believe they helped me make it bullet-proof. But I learned long ago to be humble about such things, and if someone has a factual concern, let me know.

All best,
Paul M. Barrett
Author, GLOCK: The Rise of America's Gun

NYC Shoots
January 28, 2012, 07:38 PM
Mr. Barrett:

Your WSJ articles did not make you any friends in the industry, and there were many besides myself who took issue with your lack of objectivity. This belief was not the case with others from your outlet (e.g. O'Connell, Gary Fields- DC office) or news reporters from even the anti-gun NY Times, who also covered the industry.

As for the articles in question, I encourage you to provide links to them all from www.wsjonline.com if you really are sincere about letting people read them. The readers will lack the context of what was going on at the time, but the articles will be instructional for those who have no idea how bad those times under Clinton really were. Also, I will glad to provide the substantiation you are seeking. Yes, you may be fairer and wiser now..let's hope so.

As for me bringing this issue to THR's attention, my motives have nothing to do "hurt feelings". I was not offended then and certainly not 10 years later. My point is to highlight the irony of (in the view of people connected to the issues you wrote about) a biased reporter (back then) who is now soliciting for book sales the very same industry he wrote against. That strikes me as an important consideration for everyone to make before buying your book.

I believe that Glock Gmbh would have given you a fair audience for writing your book had your reputation as a reporter to avoid not been established by your WSJ articles. Consider that Gaston Glock personally met with the Forbes reporter and gave her considerable access (ask Paul Junuzzo and Robert Glock) to the people at Syrna. Fairness may have given you access equal to what she was given, and a better book would have been the result.

To those who called my posting "heresay", you are wrong. I was present for the discussions and meetings I mentioned. They were not second hand info. Moreover, my bonnafides as a member of the RTKBA movement are well known.


As to those who think my post is about "bashing Barrett", you are also wrong. If I wanted to tank his book sales, I would have a dedicated website to blogging his WSJ articles, lots of e-mails to every forum and every state rifle and pistol association, Cam Edwards from NRA Live would take the issue up, etc. You recall what happend to the book Arming America from that erstwhile Emory college professor??

As I metioned before, posting the links to your WSJ articles would be helpful.

Spec ops Grunt
January 28, 2012, 08:12 PM
Eh, I agree that the NRA has an annoying penchant for scare tactics as a way to raise money. It's a pretty common political tactic, but the NRA excels at it. Even as a member myself, I can't stand their marketing.


As for the writer's politics, I see the discussion as irrelevant regarding this particular topic.

When I have some free time over the summer, I will look into the book for sure.


EDIT: I see a lot of people attacking the title of the book, which to me means it was a pretty good title choice.

Paul Barrett
January 28, 2012, 08:49 PM
I don't care if you air your dusty grievances about my not attending your promotional press events at shooting ranges 15 years ago. It's a free country; bring up whatever you like. I tried to offer an olive branch, saying in an earlier post that I regret not having accepted your invite. If you'd prefer to argue over it...ah, well. As for my work at The Wall Street Journal, it's out there available for any and all to read. If you want to post links to it, God bless. Knock yourself out.

Overall, if you're trying to persuade people not to read my book, you may succeed with a few, but I'll bet you're making a lot more curious about what Glock (and you) don't want them to read.

Have fun posting your anonymous jabs. (Why are you hiding your identity, btw?) If you ever want to have an adult conversation over a cup of coffee and air out what's really on your mind (assuming you have something on your mind beyond petty personal resentment), I'm very easy to find, via my website or at my place of employment.

Oh, one other thing: I don't care if my work earns me "friends" in the gun industry. As it happens, I have plenty of friendly professional relationships with people who earn their living in and around firearms. But I call 'em as I see 'em, and if that displeases someone, such is life.
All the best,
Paul M. Barrett
www.glockthebook.com

Ridgerunner665
January 28, 2012, 09:01 PM
Paul,
I'm gonna buy the book when I get a chance...I listened to the "radio show" that somebody posted here on THR the other night. I was interested in the book before that, but now I'm even more interested.

I'm new to Glocks but not to guns (just plastic ones)...why do I want to read the book? Thats simple...history has been made with Glock, they are the 1911 of this generation...and anyone who disagrees with that is just kidding themselves.

Anyway, theres my 2 cents worth...

Lynn Ward (aka Ridgerunner665)
Just an old hillbilly that lives up in the hills...clinging to his guns and religion

Birch Knoll
January 28, 2012, 10:39 PM
To those who called my posting "heresay", you are wrong. I was present for the discussions and meetings I mentioned. They were not second hand info. Moreover, my bonnafides as a member of the RTKBA movement are well known.

Oh, it's not hearsay. It's less than that, because you are anonymous. And you have no bona fides without an identity.

Maybe everything you say is correct. But Mr. Barrett is here under his own name, and you are tossing around accusations while hiding behind a pseudonym. If you want to be taken seriously, sign your name.

Spec ops Grunt
January 29, 2012, 03:35 AM
Low post counts everywhere

we are not amused
January 29, 2012, 04:18 PM
Last weekend, I bought four books at Barnes and Noble in Wichita, intending to read them in a specific order, with Paul Barrett's book being last.

I finished Mark Levin"s book Friday, and intended to read Larry Correia's Spellbound next.

Unfortunately, I got home from work and after doing chores, picked up Paul Barrett's book, intending to just read a few pages before starting Spellbound. Eight hours later, I finished reading Glock: The rise of america's Gun.

Fascinating read, and I think very fair. If Paul Barret is a gun hater, it sure doesn't show. If he ever writes another book on guns, I want to read it.

I don't agree with all his opinions, but there is a small, (very small) chance that his are better than mine. (not likely, I like my opinions, that is why I have them)

As Mr. Barrett has found out, it may be called The High Road, but there are plenty of low road people on it.

That being said, I thought it a very readable book, very enjoyable and informative. I had known virtually nothing about the Glock's history or Gaston Glock himself.

I was alternately amused and appalled by all the backbiting and political shenanigans displayed by everyone involved, both in Government, the various police and security agencies, various so-called gun experts, and the gun industry.

There is plenty of grist for the mill when it comes to upsetting or hurting people's feelings. It is not an apology for Glock, nor is it an attack on Glock, it seems to be an honest attempt to tell the story that is Glock.

I would rate this book as very informative and an honest effort to give the history of Glock Firearms in America and its rise to prominence.

Good job, Paul Barret, I will be paying attention to your writings in the future.

ahpd1992
January 29, 2012, 07:04 PM
Why two, Il give one to the old timers at work who still think "plastic guns" are a dangerous fad, and one to myself.

FWIW, Ive carried a Glock on my hip for 20 years as an LEO. Back in the early 90's when I was hired on I was a rarity carrying a glock, but I dont think it can be described just how ingrained glock is with law enforcement. The new kids basically dont look at anything else, its all about GLOCK!

Glock totally and completly dominates the LEO market, it makes one wonder why the military hasn't adapted them

Tom

NinjaFeint
January 29, 2012, 07:16 PM
Low post counts everywhere
Apparently, some dates were broken and some feelings were hurt, now they can tell the world their story.

Cheytac
January 31, 2012, 02:34 PM
I am happy to see that people are interested in the book, I found it very interesting and informative, as others have mentioned.

As to those who believe that the 1911 is "America's" gun, I wonder what the old revolver people would have to say about that?

I have no problem with Mr. Barrett's title. However, I wonder if it were, "Glock, the rise of America's gun of choice," would it be any different?

ol' scratch
January 31, 2012, 05:54 PM
I have read with interest comments about Paul Barrett's views on NRA, and RTKBA.

Let me offer a perspective from one who probably knows more about his writing on gun issues than most who have posted on this forum.

I lived in NYC for 18 years. Part of that time was spent running (as an unpaid volunteer) educational shooting events for opinion leaders in the NYC major market press. The events were run on weekends at a range near NYC and they consisted of an NRA FIRST Steps pistol course, a Q & A session on gun laws, explanation of firearms technology that confuse media (e.g. "assualt rifle" falacies), a look at NY and NJ gun laws, and much more. The intent was to provide media with an education experience, live fire, a chance to meet gun owners including NJ's champion shooters, factual information on gun ownership, and establish ourselves as sources should a journalist need information.

Mr. Barrett was among many journalists who were invited because he was covering the gun industry for the Wall Street Journal with a more junior writer and colleage named Vanessa. (I forgot her last name.) You would think that this opportunity (especially the live fire) would interest anyone who covered the gun industry as regularly as Mr. Barrett. Unhappily, however, he declined to attend each and every time we invited him and often did not return phone calls or even RSVP to written invitations. In contrast, Vanessa did attend as well as many other writers from the WSJ and other media outlets.

Mr. Barrett's coverage of the lawsuits against the industry were more troubling than his lack of open mindedness towards getting a free and fun education on guns. Many of his articles had subtle and sometimes blatant bias, and they reeked of a man with anti gun agenda. His articles appeared during the "post Columbine Clinton era" where our Second Amendment rights were at no greater risk. As memory serves me, one article that made the front page, "Six Who made a Differerence", undescored his disdain for Jim Baker at NRA and NRA's tremendous influence at stopping anti-gun legislation.

His coverage was in fact so cleverly biased against gun makers and NRA that a senior person at the WSJ asked a senior member of the NSSF if he thought Mr. Barrett was "fair." During that same meeting, a senior member of an organization I will not name said that "Paul impressed me as having an agenda and would some day write a book on the gun industry." Funny how correct that prediction turned out to be.

Now, in 2012, Mr. Barrett wants to sell books to people who support an industry he showed bias against while writing for the WSJ. He even made it to the SHOT Show this month to promote his book not knowing that many remember him more clearly that he may desire.

I asked a friend at Glock what he thought about the book. His response was that nobody at Glock would talk to him, so he became angry and interviewed people who had been fired from Glock to get "dirt". My friend also said that there were many material inaccuracies in the book.

Will I read the book? Yes, but not buy it. Mr. Barrett may have become more fair minded about guns since he wrote those biased articles years ago, but the more likely scenario is that he is acting opportunistically to befriend people who he would strip of their gun rights if given the chance.

For a read on Glock from a fair-minded reporter that actually flew to Austria to meet Gaston Glock and his family, see this 2003 article in Forbes magazine that Mr. Barrett surely used as a source for his book. Here's the link. http://www.forbes.com/global/2003/0331/020.html
You know, some people need to give reporters a break once in a while. Everyday they put their name on something and submit it to public scrutiny. I even received a death threat for something I wrote. As far as Mr Barret not attending the event, it may have been for any number of reasons. I remember covering local politics and not eating a BBQ dinner at a Republican Party sponsored luncheon due to my fear that I might be viewed as having a bias in the minds of Democrats I wanted to interview. If Mr. Barrett didn't attend your events, it doesn't necessary indicate bias. Let me point out one more important fact. After a reporter hands a story off to a copy editor, they can do what they want with it. I remember having a conversation with a copy editor who wrote a headline on one of my articles that seemed to paint a bias for an opposing side. I ended up getting some very angry calls in my voice mail from people who claimed I had a bias toward the other side strictly because they only read the headline. At the end of the day, a journalist can only do so much to write a article that doesn't paint a bias.

NYC Shoots
February 1, 2012, 02:04 PM
Mr. Barrett:

I read Chapter 1 from your book. The reports I read about the "Miami Shootout" said that the criminals obtained the Mini-14 and some other guns from murdering two people at a shooting range and stealing their guns.

Did your research find this?

Birch Knoll
February 1, 2012, 02:26 PM
You're asking if his research into the history of the Glock pistol included a fine point of the backstory of the 1986 Miami shootout, whose only purpose in the book is to explain why law enforcement was ripe for a pistol like the Glock? Do you think that has any more relevance to the book's main topic than, say, what Platt and Matix had for breakfast that morning?

NYC Shoots
February 1, 2012, 10:59 PM
Hi, totalhurst:

Why the obnoxious, sarcastic response? In case you did read my post correctly, my note was not addressed to you. For that matter, I merely inquired if the author's research indicated if the guns were obtained through theft and murder as was reported when I read about the incident. I did not ask why he excluded those facts from his book.

Now that you brought the matter up, the content of Chapter 1 is replete with things that would not satisfy your subjective standard of explaining "why law enforcement was ripe for a pistol like the Glock" Does the fact that the criminals were in the Army, had no crimianl record, worked as landscapers and did not seem criminal to their neighbors matter to "why law enforcement was ripe for a pistol like the Glock"? These facts, though interesting, were included, but the source of the murder weapons was not.

So now what do you have to say for yourself?:neener::neener::neener:

I don't expect any reply from Mr. Barrett.

Birch Knoll
February 1, 2012, 11:26 PM
Why the obnoxious, sarcastic response?

I don't view it as either obnoxious or sarcastic. It is critical, challenging the relevance and the intention of your query.

In case you did read my post correctly, my note was not addressed to you.

If you'd like to have a private conversation with Mr. Barrrett, there are ways to do that. You chose to pose your query in a public forum, so you should not be surprised when others respond to it.

For that matter, I merely inquired if the author's research indicated if the guns were obtained through theft and murder as was reported when I read about the incident. I did not ask why he excluded those facts from his book.

No, you didn't. On the other hand, since your only postings prior to that were attacks on Mr. Barrett, I strongly suspect that your oh-so-innocent query is a prelude to more of the same.

Now that you brought the matter up, the content of Chapter 1 is replete with things that would not satisfy your subjective standard of explaining "why law enforcement was ripe for a pistol like the Glock"

Ah, yes, there it is.

Does the fact that the criminals were in the Army, had no crimianl record, worked as landscapers and did not seem criminal to their neighbors matter to "why law enforcement was ripe for a pistol like the Glock"? These facts, though interesting, were included, but the source of the murder weapons was not.


And, to you, this means Barrett is... what, sympathetic to Platt and Matix? That's quite a stretch you're engaging in there. It's not enough that he described them as "no ordinary thugs", "psychopaths", and "deadly", or that he describes how Platt "sneaked up on" two agents, fatally shooting both, permanently crippled three others, and injuring two more. Yeah, he's really painting them as choir boys by not reaching back 6 months to a separate crime in which they murdered a man and stole his car and guns.

So now what do you have to say for yourself?

I say that your point, to the extent I can discern one, is lame.

I don't expect any reply from Mr. Barrett.

I wouldn't, if I were you.

aeriedad
February 2, 2012, 12:27 AM
That's a good response, ttolhurst, but I don't' think it's worth your effort here. NYC Shoots is trolling and, IMO, should be ignored. Mr. Barrett may want to respond, but even that won't solve anything. And I'm no particular fan of Glock, preferring 1911s and S&W revolvers.

Mr. Barrett's views, though a little different from mine, are not outright hostile to RKBA, and I can't think of any reason he should be so disparaged here. I may even find time to read his book at some point. If someone disagrees with him or his writing, that can be stated simply enough with much less animosity.

NinjaFeint
February 2, 2012, 12:29 AM
Seriously, he signed up to bash an author who was nice to enough to come on here. NYC trolls is the opposite of the high road.

SFCRandall
February 2, 2012, 01:18 AM
I saw Mr. Barrett give a reading on C-Span a few days ago, and was pleasantly suprised at the fair and balanced presentation to a crowd of stereotypical liberal elites. (I believe it was in NY). As he was describing his own experience learning to shoot and attending firearms training he enthusiastically confessed that shooting firearms "is fun!" , and that is a critical aspect of the shooting world that anti gunners don't get. I will buy his book.

Armchair Bronco
February 2, 2012, 03:26 AM
OTOH hand, this has been going around the internet for quite awhile. Essentially a statement regarding the ignorance of media types regarding guns in general. It's pretty accurate. So in a way, you're kinda right in as much as when anything bad happens, it's gonna be a Glock or an AK-47 that's the villain.:rolleyes:

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_LnlAerzwJJA/TTHk1jNWZMI/AAAAAAAAAzg/U6_NmQEsTpw/s1600/firearms-identification-guide.jpg

Haven't seen this before. It's REALLY, REALLY funny. And totally accurate WRT the GFW.

Thanks for sharing.

basicblur
February 2, 2012, 11:58 AM
Finished reading it a few days ago - rather than post a review, thought I'd toss out the below links for those that might be interested. You can download the interviews (just save ‘em as MP3 files) and listen at your leisure.

FWIW, I enjoyed it, although it's no doubt written for those that have little/no experience with firearms and the shooting industry.
Even if you're not a firearms enthusiast, this one reads like a spy novel - everybody was stealing from Glock, and when he found out about it, he went after them. One of his former financial advisors put out a contract on him in Luxembourg after he realized Glock had discovered he was skimming money from him (Gaston and the hit man fought to a draw)!

The former CEO/chief counsel of Glock America is shortly coming to trial in Georgia on embezzlement charges.
Defense asks judge to dismiss indictment against ex-Glock CEO
http://www.ajc.com/news/cobb/defense-asks-judge-to-1317075.html

How The Glock Became America's Weapon Of Choice
http://www.npr.org/2012/01/24/145640473/how-the-glock-became-americas-weapon-of-choice

NPR’s Fresh Air interview with author Paul Barrett
(stream or download in MP3 format)
http://www.npr.org/player/v2/mediaPlayer.html?action=1&t=1&islist=false&id=145640473&m=145698580

AAR Interview with author Paul Barrett
Glock was not happy with his book – they had his press credentials pulled for the recent SHOT show, but were not successful in having him removed from the floor.
In hour one we speak with author Paul Barrett (Glock, the Rise of America’s Gun) about why Glock was not happy about his presence at the industry trade show and what they did about it.
(NOTE: Interview starts at the 30 minute mark)
http://armedamericanradio.org/2012/01/aar-broadcast-1-29-2012-hour-1/

An older Forbes story on Glock:
Top Gun by Dyan Machan, 03.31.03
Inside the secret and violent world of Gaston Glock, maker of the most popular firearm in U.S. law enforcement.
http://www.forbes.com/global/2003/0331/020.html

Armybrat
February 2, 2012, 06:10 PM
Well, I must be one of the low road & low post count kinda guys....because I was more interested in the recent developments with the Glock family feud and the appearance that ol' man Gaston ain't shootin' blanks at age 81:

http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/the-glock-family-feud-01252012.html

:D

wannabeagunsmith
February 15, 2012, 09:20 PM
Just heard about this book....I wanna read it. Just have to scrape up some $$.

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