Henry big boy 357


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trickyric
December 19, 2011, 09:17 AM
I recently started to jones for a lever action rifle but I have no idea which is a good one for just having fun. I do not want a 22, I have shot a 22 rifle and it doesn't feel like a real gun to me. I was thinking about the Henry Big boy but as I stated I don't know anything about these rifles.
Any recommendations would be appreciated.
Ric

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InkEd
December 19, 2011, 09:32 AM
I just got that exact gun. It's great and I have no complaints. Henry rifles have some of the smoothest actions of all leverguns.

Franco2shoot
December 19, 2011, 09:35 AM
Beautiful rifle.. I have a Scoped one in .22 and it is extremely accurate. The .22 is good for plinking and small game, but if you want to take down anything bigger than a squirrel or rabbit I would go for .45LC . This is a powerful round, yet not all that expensive. Mounting a scope is not an easy thing, and that's perhaps the one drawback. Once you pass the 60's age group the open sights don't hack it. But, that's your only consideration.


KKKKFL

trickyric
December 19, 2011, 09:41 AM
I want to shoot it a my gun club, steel sights only. A little cowboy stuff :)
What is a good price for one?

InkEd
December 19, 2011, 09:52 AM
I got mine NIB for around $740 OTD at my LGS.

Double Vision
December 19, 2011, 10:09 AM
Yesterday I met a guy at the range who has a Henry, I believe in 45 Colt.
He raved about the rifle, and sang the praises of Henry customer service.
I really like that it's Made in USA, and in NJ to boot. I'm going to consider one of these myself.

snakeman
December 19, 2011, 10:25 AM
Pics please!

ilmonster
December 19, 2011, 05:20 PM
I don't have a Henry, but do have a Marlin 1894 in .357, and a .357 lever gun is a real nice choice. Little recoil, can shoot .38's or .357's, light, quick followup shots, reasonably priced ammo, and I've known folks to take the occasional deer with a .357.

Red Cent
December 19, 2011, 06:38 PM
Cowboy? Marlin.

Ascot500
December 19, 2011, 10:56 PM
To me the Henry looks like it was designed by someone with only basic CAD skills.

Would someone please explain why you would pay more for a Henry than a Marlin 1894?

jmstevens2
December 19, 2011, 11:05 PM
That is my next one to buy.

Because they (Marlin) are now part of the cerberus group and Marlin quality has taken a big hit since the change. Henry is a high quality firearm.

Ascot500
December 19, 2011, 11:08 PM
That can't be it. The Henry was around before the switch at Marlin.

jmstevens2
December 19, 2011, 11:10 PM
That is why I would pay more for a Henry. Plus the history of the rifle too.

jbkebert
December 19, 2011, 11:18 PM
The only problem I have with the Henry. They are loaded through a magazine tube like a .22 I would much prefer a loading gate but that's just my prefrence.

SG1
December 19, 2011, 11:20 PM
Since no one has mentioned it, I just bought a used Rossi 92 (Winchester 1892 design) in .357. It's the 16" barrel trapper in stainless. I scored it for under $400.

In all fairness, they are a bit hard to find locally but they can be found on the internet. They make them in most of the popular cowboy pistol calibers I believe. Just another option to consider.

TwoWheelFiend
December 19, 2011, 11:50 PM
They ARE a little pricier but Uberti makes a nice levergun

http://www.uberti.com/firearms/1866_yellowboy.php

trickyric
December 20, 2011, 07:29 AM
The uberti looks like artwork but seems pricey for something to have fun with. I am really leaning toward the Henry

trickyric
December 20, 2011, 07:31 AM
What is LGS?

local gun store DOH!

trickyric
December 20, 2011, 09:27 AM
I pulled the trigger and bought the Henry. I am so damn impulsive!

cane
December 20, 2011, 11:02 AM
There is no "history" to the Henry. It is a modern designed gun made by a company that adopted the "Henry" name that was in the public domain. Uberti makes a replica of the original 1860 Henry rifle, which is a far better rifle.

ilmonster
December 20, 2011, 11:41 AM
Enjoy your new Henry! Let us know how you like it once you get a few rounds down the pipe.

boykinlp
December 20, 2011, 05:47 PM
I pulled the trigger and bought the Henry. I am so damn impulsive!
It didn't happen without pictures!!:)

Marlin 45 carbine
December 20, 2011, 06:01 PM
I don't have this 'yellow boy' but Henry has very good CS.

Dmitri Popov
December 20, 2011, 07:15 PM
Henry is a very nice firearm. Out of the box, the action is superb. Much smoother than the Marlins, Winchesters, and such I have seen/handled/shot. I intend fully on buying a Henry eventually, after a number of other firearm related purchases, lol.

GP100Wii
December 20, 2011, 07:20 PM
Henry Big Boy in .357 is awesome. Scoping it is easy. Mallet off the rear sight, put on the cantilever scope mount, scope rings, and a scope. Easy.

Nothing like having a rifle that shoots a revolver round.

Red Cent
December 20, 2011, 09:16 PM
The "recent" Henry is like no other rifle. It ain't like anything ever made.

For a few more bucks you can get the "real" thing. The Uberti clone of the 1866 or the '73 is hands above the Henry.

There is no comparison in the actions.

trickyric
December 21, 2011, 02:52 AM
ok,
here is a picture:D

VancMike
December 22, 2011, 01:55 PM
OK, I've been lurking on this thread because I pulled the trigger on an Uberti 1873 "Sporting" rifle in a 20" barrel about a week ago, in 38 Spl/.357 Mag. I'm not a Cowboy Action shooter, but I certainly understand the appeal.

I've owned lots of lever actions, but never any designed prior to 1885. I've been fascinated with the 1860's Henry (I'm referring to the "real" Henry!) toggle link and shell carrier feature.

Of course, while cleaning the barrel, I couldn't resist taking off the side-plates and checking out the linkage. I don't have measurements of antique 1873's, but the gun appears to be true to the original, including the lever locking latch and sliding breech cover. Cool.

At the range, I discovered the gun won't chamber semi-wadcutters, nor cast bullets with driving bands ahead of the crimping groove). I'll have to be content with round-nose cast bullets and any jacketed bullets. And, because of the precise dimensions of the shell carrier block, it absolutely won't chamber over-length cartridges.

I can report I'm very pleased with my purchase. The gun is very accurate, and seems to be functioning well. Because of the heavy octagon barrel....even at 20"....and the much longer receiver, I need to acclimatize myself to a different balance point than later Winchester and Marlin rifles.

But the best part was when I opened the box on the kitchen table. I explained the rifle's history to my wife, especially about the part it played as "The Gun that Won the West." At which point, my gentle Idaho-bred wife picked it up, opened the back door and shouted, "You varmints get away from my water!"

Hmmm.....maybe we should take up this Cowboy Action thing.....

TwoEyedJack
December 22, 2011, 03:01 PM
I got a Marlin 1894FG (.41 Mag) a few years ago as a companion for a Ruger Blackhawk. I have been very happy with it. I ride horses in the back country frequently and this carbine is always in the scabbard, ready to go in case I get a chance to fill a wolf tag. With a Hornady XTP over 20something grains of H110, it will break eggs at 100 yards all day long (using a scope in Leupold QD rings). I have not been able to find a cast load it really likes yet.

larry syverson
December 25, 2011, 04:16 AM
Shot my .357 Henry Big Boy for the first time today. Very nice shooting rifle. The only complaint I have is the tube for the magazine is hard to remove and install. May get easier with time, I'm guessing. If not I'll send it in for a fix. For the money they are hard to beat. Paid $719 plus tax. Would have loved to have a yellow boy but they just want too much money for them.

trickyric
December 26, 2011, 06:13 AM
I had the same experience with the load tube. I am not sure why they built it that way but the shooting of the Big Boy was so much fun I'll deal with it. I cleaned the loading tube so I am hoping that a little cleaning and breaking in will make it easier to remove the rod for loading. Otherwise the rifle was so much fun to shoot and it's made in America so I am pretty happy.

suffolk punch
February 22, 2012, 10:03 PM
I'm a very pleased Henry owner and shooter....

I had a little bitty problem and Henry stepped up to the plate. Here is my story about it....

http://linuxweb.homelinux.com/textpattern/index.php?id=164

Norseland
February 23, 2012, 07:59 AM
Hey Trickric,

Hope you like what ever lever you go with! I know just before I got this uberti 1866,
like 3 places I called for them said well we have or sell the Henry, It's American made. And I'm down w/ that but I dont want to monkey w/ a loading tube, W/ the history involved on the 1866 w/ the loading gate addition that was where I wanted to be.

Otherwise based on what I heard about the company I'd be blasting ammo from a Henry now myself, Good Luck!

john

trickyric
February 24, 2012, 03:34 AM
after 3 months I love my Henry. The loading tube isn't a problem at all once you learn how to use it.
The Uberti is a beautiful rifle but at almost twice the price and the only ones I have seen available are shooting 45LC it was just to expensive to justify for plinking. If money was no object I would look into one.

Tim37
February 24, 2012, 10:35 AM
The only problem I have with the Henry. They are loaded through a magazine tube like a .22 I would much prefer a loading gate but that's just my prefrence.

i agree 100% it doesnt bother me to load like that on my .22 but for a big round i want to load through a gate. i know its strange but its the reason i dont have a big boy my self.

sharpshooter81
February 24, 2012, 02:53 PM
I would simply stay away from the Henry because of the way it loads....any rifle that can kill a deer, shouldn't be loaded from the tube!! :D....If you already own one, I'm sure you're not going to fess up and admit that its a pain in the rear,.... BUT I'm sure you know what I mean when you are at the range, and the guy next to you with the Marlin 1895 is jammin rounds in the loading gate and firing while you are leaning your gun up in the rack and fartin' around takin' the tube out, droppin' rounds in and trying to fit the tube back in etc.....Henry is pretty to look at and they cycle wonderfully, but to me those are not the only components I examine when buying a new rifle. For the money, you can buy an A. Uberti Henry reproduction, which is far better than what Henry is making themselves!!.....Henry has recently came out with their new 45/70, which I think had alot of people excited until they seen it...lol...IMO its just WRONG to have a big bore that loads through the tube!! I emailed Henry and asked why the tube load on the 45/70 and they suggested it was to avoid another "hole" in the receiver for a loading gate which is supposed to add strength.....my next question is....how "strong" is the receiver/action if it can't handle a loading gate hole????.....You know us 45/70 guys, we like to shoot 565 gr cast boolits over H4198 which will knock your fillings loose.....if that 565 piledriver will even fit in the hole in the tube for loading.....hmmmmm......just saying.......I think I would go with a Rossi or a Marlin over the Henry.....just my .02 worth!!

trickyric
February 25, 2012, 03:51 AM
Until you own a Henry you just can't understand how easy it is to load and shoot. The tube has a loading slot that is a good 6 inches below the muzzle so it is never a safety issue. The original 1866 Henry was tube fed, no feeder slot on the action. When I first got mine I thought the same things but as I use it I am beyond happy with it.

Tim37
February 25, 2012, 08:58 AM
its not a matter of function its a matter of i dont care for it.

i do have a .22 henry very smooth good shooting gun.

Driftwood Johnson
February 25, 2012, 12:36 PM
I emailed Henry and asked why the tube load on the 45/70 and they suggested it was to avoid another "hole" in the receiver for a loading gate which is supposed to add strength.....my next question is....how "strong" is the receiver/action if it can't handle a loading gate hole????.....

Howdy

That's ridiculous. The Winchester Model 1886, was chambered for 45-70 and had a side loading gate using steels available over 100 years ago. With the exception of the Model 1895, every Winchester lever gun after the 1866 model has had a side loading gate. And the Marlin Model 1895 has an action almost the same as the Henry, well actually it is the other way around, and it is chambered for 45-70 and loads through a side loading gate.

Frankly, I think they were blowing smoke at you. But then again, I am not a fan of the Henry Repeating Arms Company.

larry syverson
February 25, 2012, 02:04 PM
Even being a Henry BB owner I can't disagree with the Marlin/Uberti comments. The load tube is a PITA. On a cold day I could hardly open it due to the O-ring that keeps it snug. Henry sent me a slightly smaller one and now its OK.

Its a nice gun but if I had the money I'd have gotten the Uberti. I'm still satisfied though, its a nice shooting gun and lets face it... how important is it to be able to stuff ammo in at light speed, i.e. the side gate on the Marlin/Uberti. For me it was to just have a nice shooting gun that I can share ammo with my .357 revolver. It doubt you could go wrong with any of them.

sharpshooter81
February 25, 2012, 04:53 PM
Loading a big bore through a tube magazine is kinda like getting in your car through the sunroof,.... it works but why do it that way???

trickyric
February 26, 2012, 02:40 AM
or not?
sunroof not designed for entrance, loading tube designed for loading.

Driftwood Johnson
February 26, 2012, 12:04 PM
Loading a big bore through a tube magazine is kinda like getting in your car through the sunroof,.... it works but why do it that way???

Howdy Again

Well at one time (1862-1866) it was the only way to load a lever gun.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/henry/magazineclosed.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/henry/loadingmagazine01.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/henry/loadingmagazine02.jpg

By the way, with the Uberti manufactured replica of a Henry, you NEVER drop rounds straight down the tube, you always allow them to trickle down at a slight angle. And you ALWAYS keep the magazine follower under control, you NEVER allow it to slam down on a magazine full of cartridges. If you don't follow these precautions, bad things can happen.

Which by the way is the real reason the Henry Repeating Arms Company did away with the loading gate on the Big Boy. To make it resemble the original Henry a little bit more.

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