Guns for a young man leaving home...


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gspn
December 22, 2011, 07:31 PM
Lately I've been thinking about a lot of gun "collecting" issues, and after one thought led to another which in turn led to another...I found myself contemplating building a "stock" collection or a basic inventory for my 11 year old son to inherit/grow into as the years go by.

We hunt and shoot and he has a good bolt action rifle and a .22 caliber Browning target pistol, and will be getting a Sig P232 for his birthday. My process seems a bit hodge-podge though. I started to think that maybe I should have a plan or direction for these purchases. I'm in a spot where I can buy some guns and I thought it might be good to start looking at what he might need in the future.

In some ways this is a take-off on another thread I read last week about the "top 10 guns everyone should own"...but it's got a different twist.

Given everything we currently know about the politics of gun control along with the fact that we hunt and target shoot...what inventory would you build for a young man so that he had a well rounded collection that would serve him well when he left your home and went out into the world on his own?

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41
December 22, 2011, 07:54 PM
I think that a good 12 gauge shotgun would be useful. It can be used to hunt a wide variety of animals, from small game to birds to big game, and it is a good home defense weapon.

I'm not sure but a 12 gauge might be a bit much recoil for an 11 year old with higher recoiling loads, but he will grow into it in a few years.

For a pump shotgun I tend to prefer Remington 870's, and for automatics, I love my Benelli super black eagle II, but that might be a bit much money to spend on an 11 year old, depending on your circumstances.

It is awesome that you are doing this for your son. I'm sure that he will appreciate it.

gspn
December 22, 2011, 07:59 PM
I like the 870 idea...it was the first gun I ever had. I bought it myself and I taught myself how to hunt with it. It brings back a lot of great memories. It is truely a versatile gun.

Plus we reload and it will allow him to deepen his knowledge with regard to loading heavy vs light loads...experience is the best teacher.

danez71
December 22, 2011, 08:11 PM
IMO.....

Id build off off your 22's.

Forget the Sig P232 and get a 9mm instead. Long term I think its a better choice for a host of reasons.

Then add:
(in no particular order)

Lever action .357/.38

Blackhawk .357/.38 with the 9mm cylinder.

Shotgun

Another rifle in something like a min of 30-30, 30-06, .308

And another semi auto .22lr rifle



Thats the combo I'm slowing working towards so, of course, thats what I'd recommend.

Plan2Live
December 22, 2011, 08:43 PM
My sons are older and the path I am taking is to cover most or all of the classic platforms.

.22 bolt action
.22 autoloader
.357/.38 revolver, preferably larger frame
9mm semi-auto pistol with approx. 4" barrel
Pump action shotgun
Larger caliber bolt action rifle
AR-15/M4

As that collection fills out I might explore the 1911 platform, autoloader shotgun and/or the AK-47 platform. It really depends on their interests as they grow older.

captain awesome
December 22, 2011, 08:43 PM
here's my idea of a collection to cover all the bases;

12 gauge pump or semi auto shotgun

ccw handgun(I like snub nose air weight revolvers)

some type of semi automatic defensive rifle, my personal preferences are in 308, most seem to prefer ar15's in 223.

44mag or larger revolver of some sort

22 rifle and or handgun

small caliber varmint hunting rifle, 223, 22-250, 204 Ruger, or something similar.

30-06 bolt action rifle

large caliber hunting rifle 375 H&H or larger.

an optional one would be something along the lines of a 1911(my personal preference:D) or XD, HK USP, or dare I say it Glock:eek: or something similar. Something that could have a large capacity magazine in a moderately powerful semi auto handgun cartridge.

In My opinion that would be ideal. There is not a whole lot you couldn't accomplish with that menagerie of firearms, and your son would be ecstatic to receive a collection like that when he goes out into the world.

Ragnar Danneskjold
December 22, 2011, 08:51 PM
I would personally say, a pump shotgun (either an 870 or 500), some form of semi-auto pistol with a 4" barrel, and an AR-15. Not only can those cover the bases for all three main kinds of gun, but they also can give him useful skills on three kinds of guns he would use if he ever chose a profession that needed them. If be some chance he decides to join the military or become a cop, he will have a serious advantage over most others if he is familiar with those 3 weapons. And if not, they are still great guns in their own right.

Shooting isn't just fun, it can also be part of one's job. And for an 11 year old, who knows what the state of the world will be for him in 15+ years. Being familiar with the three main gun styles in use in the US might be a good skill. Revolvers and lever actions may be a ton of fun. But if one is ever forced to pick up and use a gun that is not their own, or have to learn one for a job, chances are it will be a full size semi auto pistol and an AR-15.

Nushif
December 22, 2011, 08:56 PM
From my experience when leaving home ... Something cheap, useful, small and reliable.

A reliable 9mm with a .22 conversion would have been ideal for me.

Olevern
December 22, 2011, 09:15 PM
Something you don't mind losing when the rent or gas bill needs to be paid.

X-Rap
December 22, 2011, 10:05 PM
Olevern hit it on the head right there, when my son left between me and his grandpa we sent him with the following,
10/22
870 3" 12 ga.
77 Ruger in 250 Savage
45-70 Guide gun
30-06 760 Rem
He had an AR that he bought and brought home ASAP when I informed him he was commiting a felony by having it at his home. (NYS) I bought it from him for more than it was worth because he needed money.
Of those, 3 didn't come home with him and I am sure they fell to the needs of his young family and their poor managment of money.
I have since given him an AR, G22, and a Sub 2000 of which the 2000 is sold as well. It breaks my heart because while I have sold and traded many guns I never let myself get to the point that they were an asset that I would sell because of the need for cash.
I have decided when that one feels the need for another gun I will let him buy it for himself and try out my other two.

oneounceload
December 22, 2011, 10:11 PM
Since you said targets, I will also include targets in the choice of a shotgun - and unlike everyone else here who thinks a shotgun is only good for zombie protection, I would go for a nice O/U for targets and bird hunting - simpler, easier to use, easier to be successful with.
One caveat - don't go for cheap, go for quality. Quality only costs once when you buy it

RetroMan
December 22, 2011, 10:34 PM
If he must have a 9mm, then let it be a Browning Hi-Power.

Motion for a Rem870 seconded.

Best wishes, he's lucky boy.

JEB
December 22, 2011, 10:47 PM
don't go for cheap, go for quality. Quality only costs once when you buy it

dang fine advice right there!! i have several guns from when i was younger that i bought simply because i had enough money when i found them. now they arent worth selling and are just taking up space. recently, now that i have only purchased well thought out, quality guns, i am much more happy with my collection and enjoy them MUCH more.

DoubleTapDrew
December 22, 2011, 10:47 PM
Given everything we currently know about the politics of gun control along with the fact that we hunt and target shoot...what inventory would you build for a young man so that he had a well rounded collection that would serve him well when he left your home and went out into the world on his own?

On that note, I'd probably start with the black rifles. We'll fight tooth and nail against any other bans but those will likely be the first to get regulated if things get ugly. I'd say a good quality AR-15 with 10 or more mags, and a 308 battle rifle with 10 or more mags. Maybe an AK pattern rifle with a good supply of mags too if you like those. After that you can start on the hunting rifles and handguns.

Mike OTDP
December 22, 2011, 10:52 PM
I'd wait. Find out what he wants to shoot. No sense spending money on ARs when the kid turns out to be an Olympic-class pistol shooter.

Standing Wolf
December 22, 2011, 10:57 PM
I found myself contemplating building a "stock" collection or a basic inventory for my 11 year old son to inherit/grow into as the years go by.

Good for you! You'll hear that and thanks from your lad when he's older, and he'll be glad of it all his life and do likewise for his children.

You're setting a fine example, gspn.

bushmaster1313
December 22, 2011, 11:07 PM
Buy the guns that YOU enjoy.
You can enjoy them now and when he is ready he can keep them or trade them for something he likes better.

wannabeagunsmith
December 22, 2011, 11:10 PM
Man, your son is darn lucky. My dad hates the idea of me having a gun at all, and says that if I want one I will have to buy it myself....sigh, your son will thank you someday....

kayak-man
December 22, 2011, 11:11 PM
Let him earn them.

As someone in his early 20's who is trying to get to the point where he can stand on his own two feet, I know that I value my time, firearms, and money a lot more since I've had to work for all of it.
Also, it leaves him free to get the one that he wants, the way he wants it. I have 3 guns that my dad gave me: A .22 bolt action rifle, a S&W 642, and half of a Remington 870. I love all three of those guns, and I will NEVER sell them, but they are still not my ideal firearms. The changes that I would make to them are pretty small (.357 instead of .38, a rear sight on the rifle.) and not big enough to justify buying another gun, but too big to justify changing the gun itself.

I support the 870 idea - its awesome, and as close to a "do everything" gun you can get. He can use it for hunting, sport, and defense when he's older.

I'd think about investing in guns that he can use now, and later. Guns that he wouldn't necessarily buy on his own, but that he should have. Another option here is the Ruger 10/22. I'm not the biggest fan of the rifle, but as he gets older, he can turn it into anything he wants it to be, and he may appreciate having a rifle suitable for plinking when ammo starts to cost a lot, or if he gets onto THR, and decides he wants to try one of those "Appleseed Events" that everyone is talking about.

I think that in the end, what will be more valuable, are the skills you teach him, and the memories you make. I love those 2.5 guns my dad gave me, and I loved learning to shoot with him, but since he was never a gun-nut, I learned gun safety really well, but shooting technique was limited to "Put the front sight in that notch before you pull the trigger." If you teach him how to shoot well, you'll be giving him something that he will always have: skills, and fond memories.

Hope this helps,

Chris "the Kayak-Man" Johnson

btg3
December 22, 2011, 11:16 PM
The answer should depend on the shooting opportunities you have and which of those your son gravitates toward.

As you mention, an 870 along with reloading would certainly top my list.

gspn
December 22, 2011, 11:22 PM
Thanks for the feedback guys. The P232 is one he picked out actually...he saw it on an auction list I was involved with and I thought "what the heck"... he's a good kid...and being good should have it's rewards...so I got it for him.

But now I'm putting more thought into the bigger picture...I'll be pondering all of your input.

The 870 seems to be a solid start and I'll build off of that. I've got enough pistols now that I could set a few aside to cover several bases in that sector, then it would be rounding out the long guns. I may have to do some "horse trading" with my current collection to get him just the right stuff...but that's what it's there for.

gspn
December 22, 2011, 11:34 PM
Let him earn them.

As someone in his early 20's who is trying to get to the point where he can stand on his own two feet, I know that I value my time, firearms, and money a lot more since I've had to work for all of it.
Also, it leaves him free to get the one that he wants, the way he wants it. I have 3 guns that my dad gave me: A .22 bolt action rifle, a S&W 642, and half of a Remington 870. I love all three of those guns, and I will NEVER sell them, but they are still not my ideal firearms. The changes that I would make to them are pretty small (.357 instead of .38, a rear sight on the rifle.) and not big enough to justify buying another gun, but too big to justify changing the gun itself.

I support the 870 idea - its awesome, and as close to a "do everything" gun you can get. He can use it for hunting, sport, and defense when he's older.

I'd think about investing in guns that he can use now, and later. Guns that he wouldn't necessarily buy on his own, but that he should have. Another option here is the Ruger 10/22. I'm not the biggest fan of the rifle, but as he gets older, he can turn it into anything he wants it to be, and he may appreciate having a rifle suitable for plinking when ammo starts to cost a lot, or if he gets onto THR, and decides he wants to try one of those "Appleseed Events" that everyone is talking about.

I think that in the end, what will be more valuable, are the skills you teach him, and the memories you make. I love those 2.5 guns my dad gave me, and I loved learning to shoot with him, but since he was never a gun-nut, I learned gun safety really well, but shooting technique was limited to "Put the front sight in that notch before you pull the trigger." If you teach him how to shoot well, you'll be giving him something that he will always have: skills, and fond memories.

Hope this helps,

Chris "the Kayak-Man" Johnson
For someone in his early twenties you speak with a lot of wisdom. We spend a ton of time together in the field. Now-a-days I don't even hunt...he totes the rifle and I serve as the guide.

We spent two days together this weekend...side by side in the bush or in a blind...alternately watching, stalking, talking, teaching, learning and laughing. 48 hours with my child...and no video games. It's funny...kids do a lot of video gaming these days...but if you give them an adventurous alternative they are all over it.

He loves to hunt...loves being in the woods, loves to shoot. Just this weekend he shot 30 rounds of .243 during our marksmanship drills, shot my Glock 36 (.45 ACP), a S&W Performance Center .44 Mag Stealth Hunter, he loves it all. Getting outdoors together is one of the things we'll always do as a family. You only have them for a few years under the best circumstances...and I always remind my wife that we're not raising a boy...we're raising a man...and if I die tomorrow he'll only have what he learned from me up to that point...so I don't have any time to kill.

wannabeagunsmith
December 23, 2011, 02:11 AM
Man, your guy's kids are lucky....at least my dad promised to pass his Ruger SR9 and 10/22 down to me.

kozak6
December 23, 2011, 06:38 AM
My list starts with a good .22 pistol and a good .22 rifle. From there, it would be focused towards whatever he has an affinity or particular need for.

A P232 seems to be an unusual choice. A compact carry pistol that may be unpleasant to shoot would not be my first choice for an 11 year old, particularly considering that he doesn't have a .22 rifle.

It's good that you shoot and hunt with him. If you do it right, they become family heirlooms rather than "that pile of guns my dad me".

Also, don't give him more gun than he can handle. I fired a relative's lightweight 12 gauge a bit when I was a little small for it. Even though I can handle it reasonably well these days, I remember aches and bruises every time I pick up. I don't shoot it much.

I'd wait. Find out what he wants to shoot. No sense spending money on ARs when the kid turns out to be an Olympic-class pistol shooter.

Exactly. No point in building him an armory if it doesn't suit him.

460Kodiak
December 23, 2011, 10:21 AM
I'd say as far as hand guns go, a S&W or Ruger .357 revolver needs to be there. A nice 1911 would be nice too, if you have the money to spend. I wouldn't personalize any of them though, since he may not enjy handguns that much.

Wanderling
December 23, 2011, 01:20 PM
This is very subjective.

From a practical standpoint, a nice pair of 9mm - one for target / hd and one for carry - would be at the top of my list. As a matter of personal pref I'd go with Glock 17 / Glock 26 combo but everyone's got a different taste. If you're concerned about future regulations, I think the semi-automatic rifles and handguns would be first to be regulated, shotguns and hunting rifles probably a low priority.

X-Rap
December 23, 2011, 02:55 PM
We all have different preferences but most will agree I hope that keeping the youth in the game is the most important thing. My kids all stand to inherit a fair amount of guns and related equipment someday and my hope is that they will all appreciate them. My advise is to buy a couple a year with gifting as your intent and keep anything that has great value to yourself until you can be sure they understand and share the sentimental attachment to a particular gun or it maybe lost as an heirloom. As I stated earlier one of my kids parted with a few guns I had given him but he kept the ones that he knew had some attachment like my first 10/22 or the rifle he used to kill his first elk, the others were gifts and I wish he would have kept them to start their own legacy within his family but that will come in time. I guess in short I am saying don't give something up unless you can stand to never see it again.
I would also suggest that for the price of a decent scoped rifle and a pair of binoculars you can get them a small gun safe/cabinet with a decent combination lock that they will always be able to use for something. I have plenty of guns to give but having something that they can keep them locked up in is just as important and a safe that will hold 8-12 guns considering that kids probably can't always live in the best neighborhoods when they start out might be a good investment.

youngda9
December 23, 2011, 03:15 PM
Let him get(and choose preferably) the guns that he wants or needs as he grows older.

When dad takes him squirrel hunting, make sure he has a .22 rifle.

When dad takes him plinking, make sure he has a .22 rifle and a .22 pistol.

When dad takes him small game hunting, make sure he has an appropriate rifle...223.

When dad takes him larger game hunting, make sure he has an appropriate rifle...30-06.

When dad takes him to shoot clay birds, make sure he has a nice shotgun.

When he's old enough for a revolver, get him a 4" Smith 686 .357(also shoots 38s) to practice his pistolcraft at the range.

When he's old enough for an autoloader, get him a Smith M&P series.

hermannr
December 23, 2011, 03:18 PM
When I got married 43 years ago I had the basic 5. .22 pistol (high standard trophy), .38 cal Colt officers model, .22 rifle (Marlin 80), Centerfire hunting rifle, (Rem 700 bdl), and a 12 ga Win 1897 pump shotgun.

I agree 100% with the guy that said, if you want the shotgun for clays or birds...get the best O/U you can afford.

If you want a shotgun for multipurpose shotgun, get a pump. Don't ever discount a 20ga as a lot of women do not like 12ga, but a 20ga is fine with them.

Manny
December 23, 2011, 05:10 PM
You've already got him off to a good start with the Buckmark and .22 rifle. I think the 232 might be the wrong gun as the next, short barrel CCW type gun isn't meant for developing good shooting skills which is what he should be concentrating on learning now. Maybe tuck that away in the safe for a few more years in the future, it'd be a great graduation gift.

A good shotgun for hunting and clays is a great next step, especially as you'll be reloading. To keep him developing as a shooter I would recommend two additional guns; a flattop match AR that is CMP legal and a target 9mm such as a Glock 34 or XDM 5.25.

The AR is wonderfully accurate, light recoiling and is the civilian version of what our armed forces use. I like the term "homeland defense rifle" to describe it. My version is a Rock River national match flattop which I think is a superb example of the breed. It is not only an excellent defensive rifle but a premier target rifle, especially in national match guise. The .223/5.56 is a great first step into centerfires and is a very useful caliber for many uses from target to hunting or varminting and for defensive use. Get him involved in CMP shooting with the AR and he will develop excellent field shooting skill that will serve him well for the rest of his life. Getting the rifle as a flattop will allow a scope to be installed for varminting etc.. getting maximum use from the rifle.

The Glock type 9mm is kinda the new standard with virtually every manufacturer offering something similar. I have a Glock G34 which is a terrific all around pistol but similar target type versions are available from Springfield with the XDM 5.25 and from S&W in their M&P series. Upgrading from the standard service versions to the target pistol gives a very reliable and versitile pistol that qualifies as legal for numerous different shooting competitions. Getting it in 9mm keeps the cost reasonable so he can shoot alot and it is an effective caliber for defense with the proper ammo. I consider them a great choice as a gun that will always be useful.

The hi-cap 9 and AR are two guns that might be affected by changing politics in the future so getting them now is a good idea. The .223 and 9mm these arms use is as cheap as anything is for centerfire ammo so he'll be able to afford to shoot them in lean times. They are also excellent defensive arms should he need them and are versitile for many different uses. Combined with the .22's and shotgun he'll be able to develop fine shooting skills that will transfer over to whatever type firearms he may end up prefering as an adult.

gearhead
December 23, 2011, 06:09 PM
I would suggest filling out YOUR collection with an eye toward things that you can pass along to him when he is ready to move out and be on his own. The 870 is a very versatile start, so is an AR. You can hunt with both of them and they're fun and provide useful skills. In fact, if you/he is mechanically inclined I would suggest getting an AR kit and assembling it together. Later, if he chooses to claim it he'll feel a very strong attachment to it and he'll know it inside and out. It sounds as if you have most of the pistols covered, at least for a start. You can gradually pick up a few things here and there to add to your collection that you feel he'll be interested in, too.

Patriot1/3
December 23, 2011, 06:23 PM
.22 Mark II Ruger,.22 Marlin Mag;Micro groove barrel,LMT Defender 2000 5.56,M24 5R .308,338 Lapua. Leave them the best,casue war is hell. Back home 12/dec/11,Merry Christmas

dirtengineer
December 23, 2011, 06:26 PM
Not in any particular order:

870 magnum
Quality stainless synthetic .30-06 or .308
.22 Rifle (I like CZ 452)
Stainless .357 4-6" barrel ( Substitute .44 or larger if you live in grizzly country)
Duty pistol of your (his) choice
.22 ruger or conversion kit for the duty pistol
Compact carry pistol (Kahr, Glock, .38 snub, etc.)
Pocket carry pistol (LCP, P3AT, Kahr P380)
Flat top heavy barrel AR
Either magnum rifle, varmint rifle, or 6mm size depending on planned game

If he has plans for the Military, then I would suggest a Beretta 92, a Mossberg 590, and as Close to an M4 carbine as you can legally obtain.

goon
December 23, 2011, 09:33 PM
I think you should set aside a minimal collection for him to take with him at that age. A good concealable handgun in .38/.357 or 9mm, a decent centerfire rifle, and a rimfire. Maybe add a 12 or 20 gauge shotgun if you think it's approriate for his interests at that age. Add all the others you want, just keep them in your collection until his life is stable. Speaking from the point of view of someone whose life isn't stable yet, although I really love guns, many have gotten sold off or traded here and there and trying to move repeatedly with too many is just not practical.

dprice3844444
December 23, 2011, 09:41 PM
870,he can get diff bbls for diff hunting,or chokes.
ruger 10-22 ruger 22 pistol
glock 17/26 interchangeable mags.can carry the 26 in your pocket
highpower is nice,but safety sucks.
308 or 3006 light rifle for hunting
ar-15 shorty

try to keep itwith std military calibers,if it hits the fan,those will be more readily available.

Gordon_Freeman
December 23, 2011, 11:24 PM
What about military surplus? By the time he is old enough to get into collecting, it will be very difficult to find these at affordable prices. I suggest an M1 Garand at least.
You will always be able to find a Glock or AR15 at affordable prices, assuming the left wing politicians don't screw that up. Guns that are produced today will be affordable and readily available for a long time.

Tedzilla
December 24, 2011, 12:12 AM
You've got a solid basis with the .22 bolt action and pistol, later he might want a Marlin model 39A.
The Sig 232 is a superb carry weapon, an elegant design and most important it's the gun he chose. I've got one and it's a favorite.
He'll need a big game hunting rifle and possibly a battle rifle. I'd suggest standardizing on a .308/7.62x51 platform.
A Remington 870 Marine Magnum is great for self defense and an 870 with a longer barrel is a 'must have' for hunting.
If he decides he needs a heavier pistol he can weigh the merits of .45 vs. 9mm.
There are strong reasons for a young man starting out to standardize on .22 LR, .308, 9mm and 12 gauge. That said, as long as I have the option I won't be giving up my .556, .45, .380 and sentimental favorite 8mm Mauser since I have the basics covered.

fatcat4620
December 24, 2011, 12:33 AM
I know this is not what you want to hear but take all that money you would spend on guns and invest it into a good mutual fund. It does not sound cool now but he will love you when he gets into his late 60s.

Ragnar Danneskjold
December 24, 2011, 02:07 AM
I know this is not what you want to hear but take all that money you would spend on guns and invest it into a good mutual fund. It does not sound cool now but he will love you when he gets into his late 60s.

Ehhhhh...I would do both. With the state of the world and the country, I would not trust that in 50 years that money, or even the US as we know it, will still be here. A solid 1911 or M&P9 will though.

Hunter125
December 24, 2011, 02:30 AM
I'm with Mike OTDP. Put the money in some kind of a savings account with interest and let him choose a gun at each birthday until the money runs out. Or spread it out for a while and when he's ready for another gun, go shopping. Let him decide what he wants if it meant for him.

earplug
December 24, 2011, 02:45 AM
What is the competion that your Son and you enjoy?
Buying a XYZ is useless unless is helps and keeps him happy and competitive in the shooting sports.
Various kids enjoy different shooting games. I have seen kids shoot Steel Challenge, USPSA and various other shooting sports.
Kids are just has different and adults

Schutzen
December 24, 2011, 02:46 AM
My sons grew up shooting and hunting. When they left home I gave them both a 12 ga and a 20 ga 870, a Browning Buckmark 5.5 target .22 pistol, a Remington 510 .22 boltaction rifle, a Marlin lever action 1894 (one in .44Mag and the other in .357 mag), and a Sig 229 in .40 S&W.

The youngest boy has been on his own 10 years and the oldest 13 years. They both have all the guns they left home with and have add to thier collections.

Dad had a very good year 5 years ago and bought the sons and son-in-law gun safes for Christmas.

I firmly believe hunting ans shooting together brings a family closer together.

kayak-man
December 25, 2011, 06:58 PM
You've already got him off to a good start with the Buckmark and .22 rifle. I think the 232 might be the wrong gun as the next, short barrel CCW type gun isn't meant for developing good shooting skills which is what he should be concentrating on learning now. Maybe tuck that away in the safe for a few more years in the future, it'd be a great graduation gift.

Agreed. The first handgun that I ever shot was not a .22. As a kid, I'd only shot a .22 handgun a handful of times, never as part of learning to shoot, never extensively, always just because we were at the range or something and someone was letting me try his out. The first handgun I shot was a Bersa .380. It wasn't until a couple years later that I ever shot a .22 pistol, and shortly after that, my dad sold his Bersa and got a, you guessed it..... Smith and Wesson 642 Airweight in .38Special+P. For all intents and purposes, that's what I learned to shoot on. I put a few magazines through the Bersa when we had it, but really, I learned to shoot on a gun that wasn't really made for it.

If I had a son, I'd be giving him something in 9mm, around the size of a Glock 19 or Ruger SR9. Maybe a 1911.

That's just me though. If he try a bunch of different guns, that would be the way to go. I think its fantastic that you and your son are reloading together. Maybe choose something that's easy to reload for, like .38Special or 9mm?

Either way, I understand that this isn't necessarily something your going to go out and buy right this minute, more of a list of things to accumulate over the years.

One more thing: Ear and Eye Protection. I'm sure that you guys already have a pretty good setup for that, but I would recommend in investing in some of those electronic muffs so he can still hear people talking, and safety glasses that are comfortable. He'll appreciate it later on in life, if he ever decides he wants to go into a field where passing a hearing test is mandatory. That, and its more fun to be able to talk to people when your shooting.

As always, my thoughts on the subject are worth what you paid for them.

Have a good one!

Chris "The Kayak-Man" Johnson

Deltaboy
December 25, 2011, 07:27 PM
22 Rifle and Pistol
A full sized hand gun in 38 or up.
A center fire Rifle and a 12 Gauge Shotgun!

HGM22
December 25, 2011, 11:27 PM
Did not read entire thread, so I don't know if this has been posted, but I'd leave room enough for his own interests to dictate which firearms he wants. For example, he might like cowboy guns over tactical guns, so see where it goes.

Ship_engineer
December 26, 2011, 09:39 AM
Im 25 and my father set me up before i left for college. I left for college when i was 20.

at 14 i received a bolt action .22lr(marlin 25) for christmas
at 18 he gave me his .30-06. (rem 742)
at 19 he decided that his M500 12gauge was too much for him so he gave it to me.

While i was in school, i was 21 he encouraged me to buy my first pistol(HK USPc).

so get him a good 22lr, a good rifle(.308,.30-06,.270 ect) and a 12gauge.
let him pick out his carry/defensive hand gun.

1911 guy
December 26, 2011, 09:47 AM
If I had to start my collection over, I'd begin with the same guns that I'd send my son out into the world with.

1) 12ga. shotgun. Nothing fancy, pump guns preferred. If I had only one gun, it would be a 12 guage shotgun. Large game, small game and HD all rolled into one package.

2) .22 LR rifle. I like bolt guns, but an accurate autoloader would fill the bill. Cheap plinking and work on fundamentals, as well as less expensive to shoot tree rats with than a 12 guage.

3) Suitable HD handgun. My preference is obvious, but when the time comes we'll sort out his preference.

4) Centerfire rifle. With todays options and prices, I'd be tempted, if starting over, to buy one top-tier AR lower and then diversify uppers.

LibShooter
December 26, 2011, 10:20 AM
More important than the guns you give your son are the skills and desire to use them. So right now I would spend money on guns he'll want to shoot right now. So I suggest your next purchases be a youth model 20 gauge pump shotgun and a .22 semi-auto rifle, like a Ruger 10/22.

When I was a kid, trying to shoot a mule-kicking 12 gauge that didn't fit me turned me off of shotgunning. Thirty years later I'm just starting to overcome that. A kid sized 20 will be more fun to shoot now than an adult sized 12 and more useful when he grows up than a .410.

And IMHO nothing nurtures a love of shooting more than putting thousands of round through a sweet shooting .22 rifle. You can't beat a 10/22 for that.

These guns with the Browning and rifle he already has and the .380 in the pipeline make a pretty good basic shooters' toolkit.

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