Which SKS?


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giggitygiggity
December 25, 2011, 07:59 PM
I've been looking at SKS rifles recently. Which SKS is the best? It seems like the Chinese are the most common, then the Yugoslavian, then the Russian. Is this correct? What other SKS's are available. Which is the best and what is a good price to pay? What are the differences between the SKS's from different countries? How does $280 for a Yugo with bayonet, grenade launcher sight, sling, and mag pounches sound? Thanks.

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savage1r
December 25, 2011, 08:04 PM
I paid $280 for my yugo and I think that's a fair price for one in very good condition. I've seen Chinese for $350 and Russians for $400, but I'm not sure if it's worth it.

marine 97-03
December 25, 2011, 08:08 PM
the Russian would be the best the yugos are very close to them in quality and they are milled but lack crome lined bores

Frankl03
December 25, 2011, 08:11 PM
The Russian is the a very nice one and worth $400.00. A very good one is the the Norinco SKS M as it takes AK mags. My favorite is the Yugo. Its a little heavier and can be finicky if the gas valve is corroded or dirty.

A Yugo for just under $300 in good shape is a good choice.

giggitygiggity
December 25, 2011, 08:15 PM
Why is the Yugo your favorite if it is heavier and is more finicky? Thanks.

dak0ta
December 25, 2011, 08:23 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qjpIqjS8G_0&feature=related

Watch and learn. You don't need to understand Russian to appreciate :)

sarge83
December 25, 2011, 08:27 PM
The yugos do not have chrome lined barrels. i own one of each
and prefer the norincos . the seem lighter and are reasonablaccurate. next russian and romanian.
russians go for about 350-400
in my are ad norincos around 225-300

marine 97-03
December 25, 2011, 08:32 PM
The yugos are made almost identical to the Russian ones...only lacking crome lined bores.....some chinese made were stamped with pined barrels

marine 97-03
December 25, 2011, 08:35 PM
Bang for your buck ..yugos are very well made and very easy to find

giggitygiggity
December 25, 2011, 09:09 PM
How about the Romanian SKS's? How do they stack up in comparison to the Yugos, Russians, and Chinese? Is there a Romanian 59/66 or is it only a Yugo 59/66? Thanks.

marine 97-03
December 25, 2011, 09:29 PM
M,59-66 is yugo and yugos have night sights

Ignition Override
December 25, 2011, 11:30 PM
Check the triggers, as a few Russians reportedly have rough triggers. Lots of Yugo were used in combat and don't know about their triggers, but many used ammo with corrosive primers (now sold by Ammoman).

The Yugo has the cg further out, due to the grenade launcher.
My Norinco seems to have better balance, no real bayonet, but the chrome-lined bore, and no useless launcher stuck to the muzzle.

For a similar price, with a decent trigger, the Russian might be the best package:
no grenade launcher, chrome-lined bore, Real (blade) bayonet, nice reddish-brown stock which is harder than Chinese choa wood.

Many people at "Sksboards" can also answer any questions. They even have separate forums for the Romanian and Albanian SKS, if that says something, and many of them live with their rifles.

snakeman
December 25, 2011, 11:35 PM
Russians are the best with the Yugo being second

rklessdriver
December 26, 2011, 12:06 AM
IMO -

1. Russian - The orginal. The best period. Good consistant build quality and many that were imported here are refurbed to like new condition. Not imported for some time now they command semi-premium $$$ but IMO if you have it and want one they are well worth it.

2. Romanian - Build quality like the Russian. Only problem is they are all used.. and many well used. Some are flat just rough looking and numbers rarely match. Hard to find even thou a lot of them were imported in the 1990's and a small number were very recently imported. If you can find one at a reasonable price, buy it.

3. Chinese - Incosistant build quality, but generally very good. The Chinese made more variations of the SKS than anybody. Some of them great and some junk... like the stamped one (but awesome for collectors). 90% are true to the orginal and built well. Even the easier to produce (milled) pinned barrel SKS are great shooters. There was also ALOT (millions) of them imported here and they are easy to find and still usually cheap to buy 2nd hand.

4. Yugo 59 - Good build quality. A great little carbine almost true to the orginal. It's only draw back is a non crome lined bore. Many of these are well used and abused with a sewer pipe for a barrel. They also seem to be priced at a premium.

5. Yugo 59/66 - Same as above, but add the stupid grenade launcher and gas cut off that just adds unesscary complexity. At least there were alot of them imported here (and they keep finding more). At one time they were a good deal and new ones could be bought for $139.... These days condition varies but $280-$350 is over priced IMO.

6. Albanian - Wildly incosistant build quality, odd looking gas tube, Super Cool charging handle on the bolt and a few parts that do not interchange... not to mention very few of them were imported here in the mid 1990's and they command premium $$$ from collectors.

7. N Korean - You'll probally never see one for sale, let alone be willing to give $2500-$3000 to buy it when you do find one.

8. N Vietnam - See my comments for the N Korean.
Will

zoom6zoom
December 26, 2011, 01:43 AM
Just do what I did and collect the whole set.

flynlr
December 26, 2011, 04:35 AM
a recent Romanian import. metal was in great condition and matching. stock was not as good.
this came in the last batch that AIM had . .
.
http://www.njrod.com/images/guns/romanian_sks_1958.jpg

Ohio Gun Guy
December 26, 2011, 06:10 AM
In good condition - none of them are bad, imo. I would buy on condition 1st.

That said, if faced with a table of the 3 most common reasonably priced sks's, and all in very good condition.... I personally would go: (Going Price in Brackets, IMO)

1. Russian (350 +/-)
2. Chinese (300 +/-)
3. Yugo (300 +/-)


just my .02 (Own 2 Norincos)

marine 97-03
December 26, 2011, 11:42 AM
Of those many nations that built the SKS Yugoslavia managed to turn out some of the best of the bunch (keeping in mind that “best” is almost always a subjective term). The Model 59/66A1 of this article is a good example of how seriously Yugoslavia took its small arms production the quality of the rifle in question easily rivals the manufacturing quality of anything produced in the west The 59/66 is simply a model of 1959 Yugo SKS that was arsenal upgraded to the 59/ 66A1 standards which were considered necessary for the militaries of the 1960s The most obvious of these is the NATO standard 22mm grenade launcher on the end of the barrel, and the accompanying flip up grenade launcher sight[/B][/B][/B]

marine 97-03
December 26, 2011, 12:25 PM
Unlike most Communist Bloc nations, the Yugos did not chrome line the bore of the 59/66. Most agree the reason for this is economic, as Yugoslavia had no indigenous resources of chromium and importing i from the Soviets was probably cost prohibitive or came with too many strings The lack of chrome lining is undoubtedly an aid to accuracy as few chrome lined barrels of this era are plated evenly. The chroming process of the time tended to eave some spots that were thicker than others, which left high spots and low spots n the bore; something that’s never an aid to accuracy. This is not to say that the Yugo 59/66 is necessarily more accurate than other SKSs.

Hacker15E
December 26, 2011, 01:16 PM
Don't let the lack of a chrome lined bore steer you away from a Zastava 59/66 (the "Yugo"). For 99+% of civilian shooters it makes zero difference to the quality, accuracy/precision, or durability of the SKS.

If the OP wants "the best", get a Russian SKS. If he wants the best value in a SKS, get a Yugo.

Check out the SKS boards forum before you buy.

marine 97-03
December 26, 2011, 01:26 PM
And you can find yugos in great condition easily

Pilot
December 26, 2011, 01:35 PM
Pay the money, and get a Russian SKS. I bought two in 1994 for $100 each. They are really nice rifles and worth the current prices.

ball3006
December 26, 2011, 02:04 PM
It really doesn't matter which rifle. They are all fine rifles. I like my Yugo because the added weight makes it feel like an M1. The only drawback to the Yugo is the non-chromed bore. Which is really a non issue because most ammo on the market today is non corrosive......chris3

marine 97-03
December 26, 2011, 07:48 PM
Yugos are milled and some if not most chinese are stamped with pinned barrels

ball3006
December 26, 2011, 09:55 PM
a drawback? I said I like the Yugo rifle because it handles like a M1. If the weight difference between a Yugo and a Norinco is too much for anyone to handle, you better think about going to a gym and getting come conditioning training. The non-chrome bore is a non-issue except for the lazy shooters that will not clean their rifles, thus a rusty bore. I have both kinds of Yugo rifles and they are both accurate as any other SKS. A big advantage to the Yugo, that the other SKS don't have is night sights............chris3

Hacker15E
December 27, 2011, 12:17 AM
Chrome bore hysteria never ceases to amaze me.

IdahoSkies
December 27, 2011, 01:48 AM
I have a yugo and I have the hardest time getting it to run with anything other than brass rounds. The steel rounds crap up my bore and cause serious FTE problems. I have to spend some serious time cleaning the bugger to after a range session with steel cased ammo. Which kind of defeats the reason why I bough the thing. I like it, and will proablby buy anouther sks, but it wont be another yugo.

marine 97-03
December 27, 2011, 04:19 AM
Mine eats any and everything

rklessdriver
December 27, 2011, 07:20 PM
I've got 2 bones to pick here riddled with totally worthless and false info/opinion.....

Yugos are milled and some if not most chinese are stamped with pinned barrels


WRONG.

99.99999% of Chinese SKS's are milled.

The Chinese stamped reciever SKS's are beyond VERY RARE. They bring a very big premium from collectors when they come up for sale. I've seen one come up forsale in 10yrs and I dropped out of the bidding when it went over $550....

Some Chinese SKS's are milled with a pressed and pinned barrel (few) and most are milled with a screwed in barrel. The barrel to trunion attachment method makes no difference. I own one of both designs and they are both great shooters.

Chrome bore hysteria never ceases to amaze me.

As for "Chrome Bore Hysteria"... Do your home work.

There's a reason most modern military rifles have chrome lined bores. True it's not a big deal to most US shooters - but the best deal on surplus 7.62X39 ammo happens to come from Yugoslavia and it has corrosive primers.....

Just take a good look at the ads for the majority of YUGO SKS's for sale right now. Look on SAMCO GLOBALs web site..... Every one of them say "DARK BORE". In not so many words that means:

YOUR BARREL MAY BE A PITTED AND RUSTED SEWER PIPE.

What I don't understand is why pay the same $$$ for less??

Now a little opinion of my own.

Like I said before - When YUGO SKS's were $139 they were a good deal.... Now they are $300 (more for a nice one) and thats not such a great deal.... Russian's can be found for $150 more, Romanina's can be bought for $50-$100 more and Chinese can be bought for the same $$$ (sometimes even less).

Why give $300 for a YUGO rifle with a junk barrel when you can give $300 for a Chinese one with a chrome lined barrel that you will NEVER wear out.

Will

chrt396
December 27, 2011, 08:41 PM
I bought a new unissued Yugo 59/66 and LOVE IT! It was in perfect shape..and according to the date codes..it was produced in 1972. Grenade launcher adds to the various conversations I seem to get in to when they see it. After stripping the rifle of it's packing cosmo...I finished it with 5 coats of two different oils..and topped it off with some satin urethane..and it's a BEAUTY. Shoots lights out! I clean it..each and every time I shoot...bore is clean when I'm done and lubricated.

I also have a Chinese variant..not as accurate..not as sexy...!! It was given to me free from a friend. I prefer the Yugo!

chrt396
December 27, 2011, 08:44 PM
...and to put a cherry on the top....it doesn't matter which one you buy! They are cheap, inexpensive military rifles. Buy a nice looking one and shoot the snot out of it!! How much can you get hurt by such an inexpensive rifle? Pay 300-450 for an unissued one and call it a day! It'll hold it's value! You ain't gonna lose anything..and if you do..it won't be much! Buy it and shoot it!

Hacker15E
December 28, 2011, 10:49 AM
Again, for 99% of civilian SKS shooters (who will actually clean their weapons after shooting them), the lack of a chrome bore is a non-issue even if shooting corrosive primer ammo all the time.

There are millions of milsurps that do not have chrome bores and they are juuuuuuuust fine.

Good point that there are also plenty of milsurps out there for sale that all ready have less-than-perfect bores...so the lesson here is not "don't buy a rifle without a chromed bore", it is "buy a rifle with a nice-condition bore" and then with normal maintenance it will stay that way.

ball3006
December 28, 2011, 11:05 AM
Hacker15E's post is right on the money.....................chris3

nathan
December 28, 2011, 11:09 AM
get the Russian first to be more authentic. They designed the thing and that makes a difference. If you can t find a good one, any of the makers are fine. Enjoy for its the holidays.

Sky
December 28, 2011, 12:36 PM
I've got 2 bones to pick here riddled with totally worthless and false info/opinion.....


Quote:
Yugo's are milled and some if not most Chinese are stamped with pinned barrels

WRONG.

99.99999% of Chinese SKS's are milled.

The Chinese stamped reciever SKS's are beyond VERY RARE. They bring a very big premium from collectors when they come up for sale. I've seen one come up forsale in 10yrs and I dropped out of the bidding when it went over $550....

Some Chinese SKS's are milled with a pressed and pinned barrel (few) and most are milled with a screwed in barrel. The barrel to trunion attachment method makes no difference. I own one of both designs and they are both great shooters.


Quote:
Chrome bore hysteria never ceases to amaze me.

As for "Chrome Bore Hysteria"... Do your home work.

There's a reason most modern military rifles have chrome lined bores. True it's not a big deal to most US shooters - but the best deal on surplus 7.62X39 ammo happens to come from Yugoslavia and it has corrosive primers.....

Just take a good look at the ads for the majority of YUGO SKS's for sale right now. Look on SAMCO GLOBALs web site..... Every one of them say "DARK BORE". In not so many words that means:

YOUR BARREL MAY BE A PITTED AND RUSTED SEWER PIPE.

What I don't understand is why pay the same $$$ for less??

Now a little opinion of my own.

Like I said before - When YUGO SKS's were $139 they were a good deal.... Now they are $300 (more for a nice one) and thats not such a great deal.... Russian's can be found for $150 more, Romanina's can be bought for $50-$100 more and Chinese can be bought for the same $$$ (sometimes even less).

Why give $300 for a YUGO rifle with a junk barrel when you can give $300 for a Chinese one with a chrome lined barrel that you will NEVER wear out.


I honestly do not know about all the differences. I always wanted an SKS since the first one I handled/shot in Cambodia. Fast forward several years and was able to pick up the Norenco for $300 that was like new inside and out. Shot the rifle and decided I was not wrong all those years ago with my first impression of the rifle. They are fun and my first one was accurate; much more so than you usually hear on the Internet. Then less than three months later a Boarder Patrol guy wanted to sell a SKS that looked like the weapons the Chinese use to use for their white glove parades. I purchased it for $300 also. It had a folding stock but did come with the original stock that I can put back on in 5 minutes. I tend to shoot Yugo corrosive ammo in the SKS and AK variants but I just do not worry about corrosion because all of mine are chromed lined and the barrels/rifling all look deep and new. All the rifles are fun. It is like anything you try and like we tend to stick with tried and true experiences. Think if you hold and look at different rifles one will feel and look pleasing to your eye and whatever you purchase I doubt you will regret it.

Sam1911
December 28, 2011, 12:49 PM
Why is a little weight a drawback? I said I like the Yugo rifle because it handles like a M1.I'm not sure I follow. Kind of like saying, "I like the cast iron version of Camero because it handles more like a dump truck." :)

If you are looking for a 7.62x39 rifle that handles like a rifle that was awfully heavy even for a .30-'06, then I guess you'd be very happy with the Yugo. But excess weight isn't a plus for most shooters. It causes the rifle to handle slowly/awkwardly getting on target and making transitions, is hard for smaller statured folks to hold in field positions, and is no joy to carry in the field.

If you are buying a rifle that will ride to the range in your car, be fired off a bench, and then driven home again, it really doesn't matter how much the gun weighs.

If you're going to use the rifle as a field tool or for any "practical" hunting or competition uses, then extra dead weight is not a help, no matter how much of a He-Man you are.

If you're just fond of excess pounds, no need to have it bolted to your rifle. Just carry a bunch of sinkers in your pocket -- or use these:
http://s1.hubimg.com/u/2005060_f260.jpg ;)

Sky
December 28, 2011, 01:01 PM
Quote:
Why is a little weight a drawback? I said I like the Yugo rifle because it handles like a M1.

I'm not sure I follow. Kind of like saying, "I like the cast iron version of Camero because it handles more like a dump truck."

If you are looking for a 7.62x39 rifle that handles like a rifle that was awfully heavy even for a .30-'06, then I guess you'd be very happy with the Yugo. But excess weight isn't a plus for most shooters. It causes the rifle to handle slowly/awkwardly getting on target and making transitions, is hard for smaller statured folks to hold in field positions, and is no joy to carry in the field.

If you are buying a rifle that will ride to the range in your car, be fired off a bench, and then driven home again, it really doesn't matter how much the gun weighs.

If you're going to use the rifle as a field tool or for any "practical" hunting or competition uses, then extra dead weight is not a help, no matter how much of a He-Man you are.


I agree totally Sam.....Many people shoot at the range and only carry a weapon from their car to where they decide to shoot that day. Anyone who has had to lug a rifle around all day ( or a few days ) learns very quickly that weight is the enemy. The SKS with a sling and wood stock is much more comfortable to lug around with than many other rifles ( to me ) but even with the stock 10 round mag and a couple of hour hike it makes one think about purchasing a wider sling.

Sam1911
December 28, 2011, 01:17 PM
Strangely, this "You should spend more time in the gym if you can't handle a ..." theme gets brought up often. (Usually by folks who can't fathom why our modern soldiers are so fragile they can't "man-up" and carry an M1 Garand into combat any more... :rolleyes:)

The issue is NEVER that someone "can't handle" the weight. The issue is that the extra weight presents clear, measurable, undeniable reductions in the best performance ANY individual would be able to achieve.

There is a balance point at which the weight of the gun assists in helping the shooter control that weapon under the recoil produced by the cartridge it is chambered for. Below that balance point, the weapon's recoil is harsh and recovery time between shots is slow. (Or, if full-auto, the weapon is impossible to keep on target.) Above that balance point, maneuvering with the weapon becomes more burdensome, bringing the weapon to bear on a target is slowed, transitioning between targets is slowed, and handling the weapon under field conditions is simply more cumbersome than it has to be.

Not that those tasks cannot be performed with a lard-butt rifle, but that any shooter would perform those tasks measurably faster without the extra ballast.

In the case of the Yugo 59/66, the launcher doesn't add any benefit to the shooter (except for those who do own the appropriate grenades...), and there are plenty of "normal" SKS rifles around without that appendage. Therefore, the only benefit seems to be the low price these rifles command.

carbine85
December 28, 2011, 03:05 PM
The lack of chrome isnt a problem. Most target barrels are non chrome or stainless. I have two battle beaten yugos that shoot great. If the bore is good now it will be good later if you use normal cleaning methods. Chrome is hyped up and not necessary for the sport shooter.

Sun195
December 28, 2011, 03:52 PM
In terms of chrome vs. non-chrome, I believe that early Russian SKS's did not have chrome lined barrels. (or, at least my 1950 one doesn't have it). I think they started getting chrome in 1951.

springer99
December 28, 2011, 05:08 PM
I don't see where having a chrome-lined bore is much of an asset in most cases. You gotta learn to clean them when you're done shooting; chrome-lined or not, if you want them to last. There are alot of places, beside the bore, inside of any SKS where the primer residue will hide. Those places will continue to rust up if not taken care of.

Right now, there seem to be alot of Yugo 59/66's coming to market that are almost in new condition. The Russians, Chinese and Romanians that I've seen at recent gun-shows tend to sell for more, but are in worse condition. Find any one of them in the best condition and you'll be happy.

marine 97-03
December 28, 2011, 05:42 PM
To me tha yugos just feel better made .....maybe its the little extra weight ....and the yugonians took MUCH pride in there build quality

ClickClickD'oh
December 28, 2011, 05:51 PM
6. Albanian - Wildly incosistant build quality, odd looking gas tube, Super Cool charging handle on the bolt and a few parts that do not interchange... not to mention very few of them were imported here in the mid 1990's and they command premium $$$ from collectors.

I must have gotten a lucky one. Mine shoots skeet off a dirt mound at 100 yards off hand no problem. It's the best SKS I've ever had.

res45
December 28, 2011, 10:02 PM
My shooting buddy has three Russian there nice rifles and all shoot very accurately with the right ammo,the roughest one that he has cost him around $250 but it not that bad just some finish coming off here and there and a little wear on the bluing. The Russians are well built and were well maintained,they command a higher price as far as the fixed mag SKS rifles go because there Russians and I guess you could say there the Grand Father of the SKS rifles.

My first SKS I bought several years ago was a refurbished Yugo M59/66A1. I got to handpick the rifle myself from a crate for $149 took me two days to get all the cosmoline out of ever crack and crevice but it cleaned up nice and is a good shooter,the weight doesn't bother me and the grenade launcher make it unique. My Yugo prefers the Golden Tiger steel case ammo as far as accuracy goes but likes my hand loads the best.

http://i76.photobucket.com/albums/j1/rhsikes/res45/test010-1.jpg

My other SKS was a stroke of luck,my gunsmith goes to lots of guns show and buys up batches of gun of all type mostly for the antique American made rifles and shotguns and sells off the stuff he isn't interested in. Well I just happen to show up one evening when he was unloading and he ask me if I was interested in SKS rifle because he had one in a box he got in the group buy at the show. Well it turned out to be a NIB 1965 Factory /26\ all matching all milled rifle I ended up paying about $50 more for it than the going rate for a used Chinese at the time but it was NIB so didn't feel to bad about the extra cash. It pretty much shoot just as well as the Yugo and weighs in about 1 lb. lighter fully loaded. You could tell I was a rookie back then I put the darn sling on backwards.

http://i76.photobucket.com/albums/j1/rhsikes/res45/Ammo008-1-1.jpg

Good place to find out a lot about SKS rifles. Click on the SKS link on the left. http://yooperj.com/

maskedman504
December 29, 2011, 12:41 AM
I have a Russian and a Yugo. The Russian came to me from my Grandfather, so I haven't touched it except to fire it.

The Yugo came thick with cosmoline- I cleaned it up, sanded the stock a bit, stripped and restained the stock, got a trigger job done (http://www.kivaari.com/), and put on a peep sight. I removed the bayonet also- helps with the weight- in the end it shoots real nice.

nathan
December 29, 2011, 01:16 AM
The bayonet also is a big plus in these skss. Thats another tool thats always there when worse come to worse.

Ignition Override
December 29, 2011, 04:19 AM
Even though no classic SKS (other than the so-called "Paratrooper") seems to handle like a true carbine, i.e. Enfield "Jungle", Spanish FR8 etc, the grenade launcher on the Yugo is interesting and has lots of character, but seems to be even less of a carbine.

Don't get me wrong-though my exposure to the SKS types has been limited, other than my Norinco, the longer Yugo feels like it could have the most rugged action.

But they are just less convenient for this lazy guy.

Sky
December 31, 2011, 03:24 PM
CJ 74 Well thought and posted!! +10,000

woad_yurt
January 1, 2012, 01:52 PM
I owned a Yugo and then bought a Norinco. My Yugo never got shot again. there was nothing wrong with the Yugo but it was like holding a telephone pole comparatively. I later happened upon a Paratrooper model, the short one with no bayonet lug, which prompted me to sell the full-sized one. It is my favorite rifle by a long, long shot. It's light, handy, and almost feels like a Glenfield 60. I put a $30.00 peep sight on it and I can't miss.

For comparison, a regular Norinco and the Paratrooper. I swapped out the peep sight before selling the regular one:

http://i232.photobucket.com/albums/ee150/woad_yurt/SKScomparison01-1.jpg

nathan
January 1, 2012, 03:10 PM
chromelined barrel makes it even better. The Norinco sks has a slimmer stock which i find unique. The chinese made it so to fit their small hands. THe Yugo m59/66 has the more fatter foreend bec maybe they are a better fit for bigger Serbian hands.

ifit
January 1, 2012, 03:58 PM
the chinese also produced different types of sks for u.s consumption as compared to other countries. at the time when other countries stoped producing them, the chinese had prototypes that also went into production which i think also seen some action, as far as i know the chinese also produce a select fire sks, and i beleive w/gas regulator. the ones to actually thank for importing the para models is a company in the U.S, they actually had the idea first, and had some engineers from china fly to the U.S to see if they could make such a carbine:cool: chinese sks are my favorites:)
i sold one unfired 1991 version, for the price i could not resist. kept my sino-soviet
http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y211/kadiindo/025-8.jpg

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