How long to let Hornady One-Shot case lube spray dry?


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IMtheNRA
December 29, 2011, 01:30 AM
I've had good luck with this stuff only if I literally drench the cases, otherwise, they get stuck in the resizing die.

The instructions say to wait one minute, but I've seen posts here about waiting as long as 10 minutes for the lube spray to dry. I always thought wetter is better, but I guess that may be wrong.

How long do you wait for the One Shot to dry?

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Mike 27
December 29, 2011, 01:55 AM
I let them sit for between 3 and 10 minutes and never had a problem. I have a friend who also uses it and he also swears by it and never had a stuck case. Are you spraying the inside of your die as well? Hope this helps. I have had them sit for probably 15 minutes and had no problem. Hope this helps.

ReloaderFred
December 29, 2011, 02:23 AM
The longer it dries, the better. I normally let them set for about 10 minutes before sizing them, but I've also let them sit over night before sizing. I've never had a stuck case using it, but I give them a liberal dose and then wait until it dries.

Hope this helps.

Fred

IMtheNRA
December 29, 2011, 02:36 AM
At the risk of sounding obtuse - why is it necessary for the lube to dry?

Josh45
December 29, 2011, 03:33 AM
I use it as well. Good stuff IMO. I spray them from one side then the other and wait about one minute and size them. Never had a problem.

Im guessing the reason to let them dry is because if you have to much on there, It would dent the shoulder of the case? Maybe? Not really sure?

animator
December 29, 2011, 04:40 AM
At the risk of sounding obtuse - why is it necessary for the lube to dry?
When it dries, it leaves behind a coating that is the lube. Run the cases too wet and they'll stick in the die.


For what it's worth, I've only ever had sticking case issues when the can got around empty.

Striker Fired
December 29, 2011, 06:02 AM
It has a thinner suspension fluid that the wax based lube is dissolved in so it can spray.It has to sit and "dry" so that suspension fluid can evaporate and leave the lube itself on the cases. The suspension fluid makes the lube too thin to do its job(plus the thinner itself is a really bad lube) ,so it has to be gone to thicken up.

Fatelvis
December 29, 2011, 07:35 AM
At the risk of sounding obtuse
Whoa, whoa! Watch that fancy talk around here Imthenra! Now I gotta go look that up! Lol

cfullgraf
December 29, 2011, 07:48 AM
As Striker Fired said, the carrier fluid is not a good lubricant so it must be allowed to flash off and leave the lubricant behind.

The longer you allow the One Shot to dry, the better, although there is a point where all the carrier has flashed off. I let it dry several minutes.

I do not like One Shot on bottle neck cases. Too much lube gets on the case neck and causes dents. I use it on 30 Carbine and it works fine. I feel it is too wasteful. As much spray misses the cases in overspray as actually gets on the cases. Once my supply has been used up, I will not be replacing it.

If I ever begin lubricating cases that I resize in carbide dies, One Shot would be a good choice. A light spray would be just enough for that application. A case pad or finger application would be way too much lubricant and would be wasteful.

Grumulkin
December 29, 2011, 07:52 AM
In my opinion, One Shot is the sorriest excuse for commercially prepared "case lube" out there. Let it dry, and you'll get a case stuck. Don't drench the case and you'll get a case stuck.

I know, a stuck case can simply be removed with a stuck case remover. That is, unless the tap breaks. One Shot is how I ruined my 444 Marlin resizing die. Learn from my error, save some money and use something else.

ColtPythonElite
December 29, 2011, 07:56 AM
Been using One Shot for nearly 20 years without a stuck case. I guess I'm just lucky.

As far as letting it dry goes, I really don't. I just spray it on and go to work.

springer99
December 29, 2011, 08:26 AM
One-shot is all I use any more; works fine for me. After I spray the cases, I fill my primer tray and then go to work. I'd guess that delay is about 1-2 minutes at most. I've never had a stuck case or dented neck with this stuff and even use it to lube my press parts from time to time. It doesn't seem to pickup dry, primer debris or powder grains like other oils/greases tend to.

matt 7mm
December 29, 2011, 09:23 AM
I have had good luck with one shot over the last 15 years or so.I set the cases up on an old news paper or something to catch overspray.set the cases up in a square like 5 rows of 4 if im gonna do 20 rounds then litely spray down at about a 45 degree angle from each side and a real lite shot straite down from the top to get a little inside the neck then let set for just a couple minutes.Its worked fine for me on 223,243,7mm-08,45-70 and 300 win mag. and i use a lee hand press half the time that doesnt have near the force of a real bench mounted press.

Kingcreek
December 29, 2011, 09:26 AM
After some stuck rifle brass, I only use the one-shot for pistol brass in carbide dies. I tried it slightly wet, I tried it dry,...just ain't worth the trouble.

AFK
December 29, 2011, 09:52 AM
I don't load for rifle, but I use One Shot to lube the ram on my press and I will occassionally spray it in my sizing dies even though they are carbide.

J_McLeod
December 29, 2011, 09:53 AM
I've used most of a can so far and only had one dented neck and one stuck case.

USSR
December 29, 2011, 09:59 AM
After some stuck rifle brass, I only use the one-shot for pistol brass in carbide dies.

Yep, use of One Stuck for pistol brass with carbide dies is all it's really suitable for.

Don

RustyFN
December 29, 2011, 09:59 AM
First off you have to shake the can very good to make sure you are getting the lube on the case. Then I let them dry for five minutes. If you don't let them dry you will stick the case. The easiest way I found to lube my 223 brass is to put a few hand fulls into a big Ziplok bag and give it a 2 second spray. Close it and mix them for a couple of minutes. Open the bag and repeat. Dump them in a container and let dry for 5 minutes then go for it. Haven't had a stuck case in years.

murphy's law
December 29, 2011, 09:59 AM
Been using One-Shot for years now without a single stuck piece of brass. I use the old trick of spraying a baggie and then just put a 100 or so and roll around for a few seconds. I then immediately start loading so at best maybe 1-2 minutes to let it dry. Heck I think I read either on the can or somewhere it only takes a couple minutes to dry and no need to wait 10-15 minutes or longer. Some guys make their own lube but for the price of a can and considering how long it lasts, you can't beat HOS IMHO.

Blue68f100
December 29, 2011, 10:20 AM
The can says to let it dry. This is a dry lube so it must be given time to dry. The time varies depending on your environment. I used it once on a 308 round and it tried to stick so I backed it out. I only use Imperial Sizing Wax now. I never lube pistol brass since all of my dies are carbide. Some do to make it easier but not required.

Master Blaster
December 29, 2011, 06:03 PM
How long to let Oneshot dry>>>>

As long as it takes for a can of imperial sizing wax to be delivered to your house.
Then give the one shot to the trash man.

I've used most of a can so far and only had one dented neck and one stuck case.
Most of a can to lube two cases???

matrem
December 29, 2011, 08:42 PM
Assuming it's used correctly, One Shot is the quickest truly effective lube I'm aware of for high volume sizing.

gamestalker
December 29, 2011, 10:31 PM
You shouldn't be having problems like that. I use Dillon spray on and always let the cases dry for no less than 10 minutes and have yet to feel any unusual resistence, and certainly none getting stuck. Drenching them won't help, and it might even increase stuck cases, especially if it prolongs the drying time of the lube.

I always find another task to keep me busy for 10-15 minutes before I run them through the die. And I've even lubed them and then resized them the next day without problems.

So, lube the inside of the necks, lightly spray the outside, and then let them dry for a minimum of 10 minutes and I promise you won't have any further issues. The spray on lube's will only work when they are 100% totally dry!

moxie
December 29, 2011, 10:38 PM
Pistol straight wall cases and carbide sizer don't require any lube at all.

spoogie
December 29, 2011, 10:44 PM
The only time I've stuck a case, it's been a .204, after I've sprayed the brass. Then let it sit, while I spray the die, and double check everything. Funny thing is, I've sized 50 or 100, and everything worked fine. Then repeated the brass and die spraying on the next batch of 50, on case 51 on one occasion and case 101 on another occasion and stuck those .204's rock solid. Never had that problem with 9mm and carbide dies, of course, and not with .22-250, either. As long as I spray those two calibers slightly, and absolutely hose down .204 brass, at let it dry for several minutes when it's .204, everything works fine.

-S

animator
December 29, 2011, 10:51 PM
For everyone saying it's not a good lube... I've sized over 1k .223 brass with it and never had a problem.


'course, I also ran a few .223 with NO lube, and didn't notice any ill-effects either.

I've done several hundred .308 cases with it as well, and the only time I've ever had a stuck case with it was with a .308 case when the can was almost empty.


I'm currently using Lyman lube that came with my reloading setup, simply because it's what I have on hand right now, and it will last me at least another year before it's gone.

billybob44
December 29, 2011, 10:59 PM
Pistol straight wall cases and carbide sizer don't require any lube at all.
They do not REQUIRE lube, but every 10th or so case lubed sure makes the job easier..Bill.

CHALK22
December 29, 2011, 11:35 PM
I have used the HOS since I started reloading, and I have had maybe 3 stuck cases in about 5000 rounds of .223, and all 3 were my fault. I am pretty sure they were in the corners of my reloading blocks closest to my hand, probably missprayed since I didn't want to get any on my hand. Other than that, I haven't had any problems with it at all. I like it, and suggest it to new reloaders.

cfullgraf
December 30, 2011, 07:46 AM
They do not REQUIRE lube, but every 10th or so case lubed sure makes the job easier..Bill.

Makes resizing easier, Maybe makes the die last a bit longer (two times forever instead of forever).

But not required unlike steel dies.

ole farmerbuck
December 30, 2011, 07:58 AM
Been using One Shot for nearly 20 years without a stuck case. I guess I'm just lucky.

As far as letting it dry goes, I really don't. I just spray it on and go to work.
Same here. Never had any problems.

helotaxi
December 30, 2011, 08:53 AM
As long as I spray those two calibers slightly, and absolutely hose down .204 brass, at let it dry for several minutes when it's .204, everything works fine.
.204 Ruger is a tricky one since it has very little case taper.

4895
December 30, 2011, 10:35 PM
I use Hornady One Shot on my straight wall pistol brass that is loaded in my progressive (carbide die) press. I have used it on .223 for AR with some dented shoulders and 1 aggressively stuck case (almost broke my press) out of 400 rounds or so. I let it dry about 2 minutes before I start to load. I use a $1 shoe box size plastic tub from Big Lots to spray lube any of my brass in. For rifle it does work, but I think there are better options out there. I really like LEE case lube. If I plan on working 50 pieces of rifle brass, I lightly lube the ID (inside diameter) of the necks on 10 pieces, and work a light amount of lube below the shoulder on the rest. When I feel tension (about 5 rounds), I put a neck lubed piece on deck for the next size operation. It is not greasy like some case lubes and wipes off cleanly and easily.

rskent
December 31, 2011, 05:26 AM
I use loading blocks so I just fill up the blocks, and with the cases all lined up give them a good spray from both sides and then right down inside the neck.

I used to use imperial but I wasn’t getting very consistent sizing on my cases. I believe the expander ball was pulling the case on the way out. Using

one shot has tightened up my sizing quite a bit. I know there are other ways of lubing inside case necks but one shot is very easy to use and works well for me.

Good luck

Steve

dagger dog
December 31, 2011, 07:05 AM
I have misused One Shot one time, didn't let it dry and had my first and only rimless case that had to be hammered out of the Lee die.

I think the answer to the question is in the wording, LET IT DRY, dry to the touch if it isn't dry then it's wet,if you have a problem feeling the moisture on your skin, use a tissue to blot it and see if the tissue is WET, if it is then it isn't DRY!

USSR
December 31, 2011, 08:36 AM
I used to use imperial but I wasn’t getting very consistent sizing on my cases. I believe the expander ball was pulling the case on the way out.

Steve,

Consider using bushing dies, and eliminate that expander ball all together.

Don

FROGO207
December 31, 2011, 09:18 AM
I was using a can of OS every week or so and that got expensive for sure so now I make my own out of liquid lanolin and isopropyl alcohol. No matter, they both need to dry to work. If you touch the brass and it feels "sticky/tacky" you should not stick a case if you put on a good enough all around coat to begin with. I dump a pile of them into an old yogurt container till about half full and spray, swirl them around with my fingers some and spray again until they all look wet. then dump them out on an old cookie sheet to dry for about 5-8 minutes while preparing the next batch or two or three or-----. The two issues I had when first using OS were too short a drying time or not nearly enough lube all around the case. Those guys here complaining about stuck brass and now using say Imperial would find that if the OS felt as slippery as their Imperial all over it when putting the brass in the die there would be no stuck cases IMHO:scrutiny: YMMV but this is how my system works and works well.

blarby
December 31, 2011, 11:01 AM
The time expended finding a more suitable wax such as Lee, or Imperial- would be Juuuuust enough time.

Sorry, couldn't resist.

spoogie
January 4, 2012, 06:38 PM
.204 Ruger is a tricky one since it has very little case taper.
... and a tiny rim.

-S

EddieNFL
January 4, 2012, 07:05 PM
Assuming it's used correctly, One Shot is the quickest truly effective lube I'm aware of for high volume sizing.

Not counting the time required to shake and let dry?

I've successfully used One Shot, but every other lube I've tried is slicker and doesn't require me to aggravate my shooter's elbow or use a stop watch. Spray and size.

Cascades
January 4, 2012, 07:16 PM
I have trouble with .270 and .222 cases sticking with One Shot. Have stopped using it for them.

Works just fine for straight-walled and tapered cases in rifle and pistol.

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