Cutting out crimps on primer pockets?


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glockky
January 2, 2012, 02:26 AM
I have just started reloading some 223 brass that had crimped primers. I have an rcbs cutter which i have installed on a drill and it works great. My only question is does this have any bad affects to your brass?

It seems to me that is takes quite a bit of brass out of an important area. There is less brass holding the primer in, and thins out the base of the case. I am sure there are lots of people who use this method just wanted to know the good and bad results of it. Thanks

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Twmaster
January 2, 2012, 04:02 AM
If you are careful and just touch the crimp only with that tool you will be fine. I used to do a similar thing with a countersink bit in a drill.

What works better is the RCBS primer pocket swage tool. Instead of removing material this tool pushes the crimp into the sides of the pocket helping to keep the primers tight.

This tool is worth the $28 or so it costs if you reload a lot of crimped cases. Mine gets lots of use.

Dillon also makes a really good tool. It's pretty spendy at ~$100 or so.

Grumulkin
January 2, 2012, 04:22 AM
I have just started reloading some 223 brass that had crimped primers. I have an rcbs cutter which i have installed on a drill and it works great. My only question is does this have any bad affects to your brass?

It seems to me that is takes quite a bit of brass out of an important area. There is less brass holding the primer in, and thins out the base of the case. I am sure there are lots of people who use this method just wanted to know the good and bad results of it. Thanks
1. You're not going to make your case unsafe doing it the way you're doing it.

2. The RCBS primer pocket swager is, in my opinion, an easier and better way to go.

4895
January 2, 2012, 06:59 AM
I agree with both. If you take brass off, are you shortening the life of the cartridge? I mean, if you are going to spend the time to ream the primer pocket, trim and debur, why shorten the life of the brass. I would hate to do all of that work and only get a firing or two and primers start to fall out. Know what I mean? I use the RCBS swage tool, it can be a pain to keep aligning cases each operation, but it's not bad. I invested in a $20 LEE press when on sale at MIDWAYUSA to use for universal depriming (crimped primers can be hard on pins, why risk breaking a resizing pin?) and crimp removal. It works for me.

FWest
January 2, 2012, 08:03 AM
http://www.ch4d.com/catalog/?p=57

I use one of these, works for me.

glockky
January 2, 2012, 04:14 PM
I will try just barely cutting some and see if i can get a primer in them. Thanks for the info.

rfwobbly
January 2, 2012, 09:37 PM
A "single flute" countersink bit will cut smoother and cleaner in a hand drill or drill press. The angle (82 or 90 degree) is not important to primer pocket or primer seating.

http://ptreeusa.com/Peach%20Graphics/counter_sink_bits_200_07.jpg

A multi-flute bit, like most common reloading chamfer tools, will chatter during motorized use and leave one more divot that the number of flutes. Like unto the way a common 2-flute drill bit sometimes chatters and leaves a 3 lobed hole.

;)

angus6
January 2, 2012, 09:53 PM
The Hornady reamer is a great tool and cheap too

Kerf
January 2, 2012, 10:32 PM
They both work, obviously. But, the swage tool is the "no fault, Murphy's Law killer" device.
If you have hundreds or thousands of cases to do, the variations between cases (hole depth, width, hard or soft) can come back to bite you using the drill type. Not to mention the brass swill or swarf all over the place made by drilling. The swage tool is clean and you can get a feel for how uniform, tight or loose, the primer pocket is. Any that are hard or soft can be segregated and checked further before using. So, a swage tool kit is a good investment for anyone wanting to reload military type brass.

kerf

oldfortyfiveauto
January 2, 2012, 10:39 PM
I gave up on the swage type because of the inconsistencies in most cases. Had to adjust the machine way too often. I've settled in on using a an old 60 degree center drill with the drill point ground off. Center drills tend not to chatter and the 60 degree angle tends to make priming easier. I just free hand them on a drill press. I've used cases that others chamfered way too much, like half way down the pocket without any issues (a hot load might be trouble though).

tlen
January 2, 2012, 11:41 PM
Got a small primer pocket reamer for <$10 and go for it.
Most reamers can be detached from the handle and put in drill to speed up the process.
The reamers will cut only the crimp as the end of the reamer is flat and will stop cutting when it bottoms out where the primer seats.

use2windsurf
January 2, 2012, 11:44 PM
I have just started reloading some 223 brass that had crimped primers. I have an rcbs cutter which i have installed on a drill and it works great. My only question is does this have any bad affects to your brass?

It seems to me that is takes quite a bit of brass out of an important area. There is less brass holding the primer in, and thins out the base of the case. I am sure there are lots of people who use this method just wanted to know the good and bad results of it. Thanks
get the Rcbs swager die ($20) which reforms the pocket to the right size. this has worked great for me

Jim Watson
January 2, 2012, 11:47 PM
The RCBS loading press mounted swager is a bit tedious to use. They now offer a bench machine in competition with the Dillon. But you would have to be doing a lot with milsurp brass to justify the cost. I just pop the odd one that shows up in mixed "once fired" brass with the inside chamfering tool.

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