Ruger LCP .22 for self defense?


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340PD
January 2, 2012, 07:29 PM
As an instructor for basic firearms classes I see a lot of students, particularly women, that are looking for a SD gun for around the house or carry. Many seem to have difficulty with semi auto's with respect to racking the slide, clearing malfunctions, and loading magazines, and general maintenance. Our classes basic are not long enough or detailed enough to absolutely guarantee a student will remember everything they are taught. That turns us to the easiest to manage for everyone, revolvers. I find it is easier to teach people to shoot revolvers accurately than deal with the above issues with respect to semi autos. The S&W small frames are great but ammo costs prevent many from returning for practice on a regular basis. Am I way off base looking into the new Ruger LCR .22 as an option for some students? It has 8 rounds and can be loaded with hot ammo that is much easier for some people to manage and practice with. I know, that I do not want to be standing in front of anyone with any firearm pointed at me and my thoughts are one or two well placed shots should stop most threats. If they practice with, and feel the need for, a larger caliber they can invest in one at a later date and they still have the .22 to bring to the range on a regular basis. Am I way off base?

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wannabeagunsmith
January 2, 2012, 07:35 PM
Sir, the LCP is a .380.

22lr
January 2, 2012, 07:42 PM
There is a new LCR chambered in 22lr, which i believe is what he was talking about.

To answer the OP, the 22 isn't the most powerful defense round. But it will do the job, just might take an extra round or two. But as with any round, its all about placement, if you cant hit em with a 45acp, then having a 45 ain't going to do ya a lick of good.

walker944
January 2, 2012, 07:45 PM
Yeah, I got a bit confused too. I think the confusion is in the thread title. I believe the OP means LCR .22; not LCP .22. But, he got it right in the body of his comments.

I don't see any problem with people using a .22 LR for self defense, if that's ALL they can manage. My dad is 84 and is only comfortable with a .22 at this stage in his life and physical capabilities. I'm just glad he's still safety aware and conscientious of person protection.

rcmodel
January 2, 2012, 07:46 PM
I have and sometimes carry a CT laser-grip equipped S&W 317 8-shot .22 revolver stoked with CCI Mini-Mag solids.

Perhaps not as good as a .45 ACP or something.

But I pity the fool that gets in front of it if he values his sinus cavities or heart & lungs.

IMO: The same gun in .22 WMR would be an even better SD choice.

rc

22lr
January 2, 2012, 07:47 PM
Or is this a super secret Ruger spy telling us that there is a .22 LCP in the future?

punkndisorderly
January 2, 2012, 08:18 PM
It's a personal choice, but I would strongly recommend against the. 22 (or. 25 or. 32) for self defense in most cases. Ditto snubbies and ultra compact pistols. The only exceptions:
-the person is physically unable to handle anything of bigger caliber due to infirmity
-the person is unwilling to obtain enough training to handle a larger caliber (but is willing to obtain the training to become at least safe to themselves and others)
-anything larger will be left at home where it will do no good at all

Yes, a .22 can do the job. In many instances, the sight of a gun may result in the threat breaking contact. Yes, in many instances shots with a .22 will result in the attacker breaking contact. Yes, a .22 can incapacitate and/or kill. However, if i'm ever forced to draw and fire, I don't want to handicap myself any more than I already am by using a pistol (as opposed to rifle, shotgun, or howitzer). I want to dump as many rounds of the largest diameter possible into center mass as quickly as I can get them there, repeating until whoever i'm shooting stops whatever it was I started shooting him for to begin with.

Some argue "if you don't think .22 is sufficient, stand there and let me empty one into you". I hate this argument. That assumes I won't be firing back at the same time (which means you want to put me down as quickly as possible).

Also, I don't want to be stabbed with a knife, but don't leave my gun at home in favor of one.

I don't want to be kicked in the junk, but don't leave my gun at home on favor of a pair of pointy boots.

I don't want to be rubbed on by a half-naked gat guy, but I don't leave my gun at home on favor of a speedo.

2wheels
January 2, 2012, 08:29 PM
If it's all you can get them to shoot, sure.

But better yet, see if they can handle a .38 Special revolver first. Even with weaker loads I'd prefer it over a .22.

Carl Levitian
January 2, 2012, 10:46 PM
No, I don't think you are off base at all. If the .22 is practiced with on a very regular basis because the person finds it fun to shoot, it will do nicely. In the couple of years I was on the Trinidad Colorado P.D. I was the responding officer to two different shootings involving 4 different persons. Three of the 4 had a single .22 round to the central torso area, and were down on the ground out of action. Two of them barely made it even with being transported right to the ER. Both had a bullet to the abdoman and spent 4 hours in emergency surgery repairing the stomach and intestinal tract. One person got hit in the upper right arm, and was trying to not move the arm at all, as it hurt like H---. He was very vocal an how it burned.

The three of them in one incident in may of 1978, that were shot by a young man with a RG .22 revolver were drunk, but were stopped by being shot. They were assaulting the victim, and one was hit in the stomach, went down and was curled up a tight fetal position and not capable of response. The second was hit high in the right chest, almost to the shoulder and was slumped on his butt leaning against a building moaning how it hurt, the third assaulter was the one hit in the upper arm, and was standing there acting macho, until his arm was moved by an EMT looking for an exit wound, and he yelled very load "Don't move it, don't move it man!" All three were part of a group of 6 that had attacked the victim in Geovanni's Bar on Commercial street. The victim ran outside, chased by the 6 attackers weilding pool ques and broken bottles, and shot at his attackers as he ran. Three of the 6 rounds fired found targets and stopped them. The three persuers not hit, ran off in the other direction. The cheap RG .22 worked very well.

The .22 will work if the shooter does his or her job. It's the person behind the gun that makes the difference, not the hardware.

Carl.

Manny
January 2, 2012, 11:14 PM
Though I don't yet own one I feel strongly that LCR's are the best of the breed in pocket snubbies. I plan to get one to supplement or possibly replace my current SP101 and I'm strongly considering getting an LCR 22 first to allow for significant practice that should transfer to any snubby.

I think you have an excellent idea with recommending the LCR 22 for beginers. It's very minimal for defense but it is something, and being cheap and low recoiling it should encourage practice, hopefully enough to gain skill and interest to move up to a more substantial arm.

I truthfully am not that big on .22's, this one however has me feeling differently and I suspect it'll be the next gun I buy.

doc2rn
January 3, 2012, 01:07 AM
Too bad it doesnt come in .22 WMR, or I would have bought one in a heart beat.

Cactus Jack Arizona
January 3, 2012, 02:02 AM
Now that you mention it, Doc, I don't know of any Concealable pistol/revolver chambered in .22mag. I wonder why? :scrutiny:

Inebriated
January 3, 2012, 05:28 AM
RAMI,

Charter Arms makes one.

http://www.hyattgunstore.com/charter-arms-pathfinder-.22-magnum-revolver-2-barrel-stainless-finish.html

MedWheeler
January 3, 2012, 06:24 AM
Not way off base by any means. There will always be people who will use a .22LR weapon for any of various reasons. It's not my first choice by any means, but it can certainly be capable, in the right hands, or ending most forms of a threat. Also, most of these people (those who won't make firearms a pastime or hobby) would be better served by a revolver in that caliber than by an autoloader.
Personally, I'd like to see an LCP-type in that caliber, too!

340PD
January 3, 2012, 10:52 AM
Thanks for the responses. I did mis- title and I could not edit it to read LCR. Most of my questions were answered as I thought they would be. I think I will pick up one of these to use as a training aid. If it morphs into more than that, good. My goal is to produce confident shooters that will return to the range and hone there skills.

rcmodel
January 3, 2012, 12:05 PM
, I don't know of any Concealable pistol/revolver chambered in .22mag.

http://www.smith-wesson.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product4_750001_750051_764925_-1_757767_757751_757751_ProductDisplayErrorView_Y

http://www.smith-wesson.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product4_750001_750051_786530_-1_757767_757751_757751_ProductDisplayErrorView_Y

rc

The Lone Haranguer
January 3, 2012, 12:53 PM
.22 is great for easing a new shooter into the game and for training and practice, but I would urge most people to graduate to a bigger caliber for self defense.

easyg
January 3, 2012, 12:54 PM
.Sure a .22 might eventually stop your attacker.
But most likely they will stop long after they have killed you.

45_auto
January 3, 2012, 02:26 PM
Sure, any handgun might eventually stop your attacker.
But most likely they will stop long after they have killed you.

There you go, fixed it for you.

3KillerBs
January 3, 2012, 10:10 PM
While a .22 is a fine gun for learning on, a joy to shoot at the range, and definitely the budget-friendly option for getting rounds downrange, and while I would feel no lack of confidence if I were to need to defend myself at a time that I was holding my Mark III in my hand, there is no good reason that a woman should be condescended to by an automatic assumption that she would be unable to handle a semi-auto in a defensive caliber.

I assure you, my food processor is a more complex piece of machinery then my husband's S&W M&P 9. A woman who can run her microwave has the intelligence and mechanical aptitude to run a semi-auto.

There is certainly nothing inherently wrong with revolvers. Its just that the assumption that woman = not capable of handling the "complexity" of a semi-auto gets irksome. Really, we handle machinery every day. Sit down with my sewing machine (a VERY basic model with only 9 stitch types, one automatic attachment, and half-a-dozen special purpose feet), for a while and rethink please. :)

Lawdawg45
January 4, 2012, 04:55 AM
340PD, you're not "off base" at all. As a matter of fact, most firearms instructors will not recommend a semi auto for a new shooter and the .22 revolver is a good first choice. Aim point and trigger control can be mastered before moving up into more powerful calibers, and practice ammo is dirt cheap for the .22. My wife is a tack driver with all my handguns including my .44's and .45's, but she asked for a .22 mag revolver for Christmas and that's now her daily carry gun.;)

LD

MedWheeler
January 4, 2012, 06:07 AM
Sure any handgun might eventually stop your attacker.
But most likely they will stop long after they have killed you.

Sure, any handgun might eventually stop your attacker.
But it's possible they will stop after they have killed you.

There, polished up even more.

I dispute the "most likely" phrase. Statistics are showing that the vast majority of defensive uses of handguns are indeed successful and, in many cases, don't even involve the attacker being shot.

Ghost Tracker
January 4, 2012, 08:45 AM
Statistics are showing that the vast majority of... As a Southern Gent who appreciates "sporting" odds, I understand statistics & probability. But, IMHO, carrying a handgun for self-defense isn't quite so casual. If I'm going to go to the expense & effort, along with accepting the social, moral & ethical responsibility, of being armed in our society I'm certainly am NOT going to gamble on the effectiveness of a marginal caliber. Folks who are MUCH wiser than I have repeated the same advice for a long time. Carry the most powerful handgun that you can both conceal & shoot well. It's a most serious decision to be armed. The decision to be armed with at least a .38 spl or 9mm is, to me, not that big of a jump. It's like deciding you want to race motorcars for a living, then showing up at the track with a Chevy Geo. It will go around the track. And you are involved in the race. But winning? Uh, well statistics are showing...

JustinJ
January 4, 2012, 10:46 AM
The .22 is obviously better than nothing but compared to other options it is a very poor choice. People who talk about "shot placement" fail to understand that nice groups against a stationary piece of paper do NOT translate to real world accuracy. The more damage a bullet does the higher the chance of incapacitating an attacker. Lucky shots with .22s happen but if a person's defensive strategies rely on blind luck then weapon selection is the least of their problems.

My girlfriend settled on a Russian Makarov. I'd prefer she use at least a 9x19 but the Mak has served the Soviet Union well for a long time and the key is that she can shoot it well and feels comfortable with it. This is largely because of the caliber and relative weight of the steel frame. Another far better choice is .380 however tiny guns like the LCP are a poor option for those who are recoil sensitive. In my experience women often have trouble with racking a slide because they do so too tentatively but with a little practice they will find they can operate most any auto. If not then a .38 revolver is a far better choice than a .22. Another better option than .22 would be the Baretta Bobcat in .32 as one does not have to rack the slide to load the gun. It's small but having a metal frame dampens some of the recoil.

Shawn Dodson
January 4, 2012, 11:39 AM
For the kinds of people you mention I suggest a .327 Magnum revolver loaded with .32 S&W Long lead wadcutters. It offers six shots and the bullet will crush a full .32 caliber permanent cavity. It also achieves adequate penetration. Recoil is negligent. Wadcutter ammo is widely available and cheap (less than $20 for 50 rounds).

S&W's 632 revolver w/ 2 1/8" bbl would be a great choice. It has a smooth DAO trigger:
http://www.smith-wesson.com/wcsstore/SmWesson2/upload/images/firearms/detail_md/178046_01_md.jpg

Ruger and Taurus also offer modern DA revolvers in .327 Magnum.

leeroy71
January 4, 2012, 12:12 PM
Well played Mr Dodson. IMHO .32 cal. makes ideal SD gun.
Larger than .22 but not harder to control. Altough i currently do not own any .32's one is definitely in the furture.

However, I DO NOT EVER want to be on the buisness end of any .22!:eek:
So many sucessful (ie deadly) shootings can't be wrong.;)

Patriotme
January 4, 2012, 01:08 PM
I think that many other posters did a good job of explaining that some people can only shoot a .22lr. This is especially true of those with physical disabilities.
A little gun is better than no gun.
One further point, it's probably better to get the .22lr LCR than a .38 Spl snubnose that you are scared of, can't afford to shoot or cannot hit anything with. I would not pick a .22lr as my first choice but it may be the best choice for some.
I remember having a conversation with a coworker and all around (in his mind) gun guru at work a few years ago. He was telling everyone that a 12 ga shotgun is the best home defense gun ever made and that's all that anyone really needs. Then he regaled us with stories of his prowess with the shotgun. When I mentioned that our coworker with carpal tunnel in both hands can't shoot a 12 ga he was stumped. When I mentioned that his wife is not going to carry a shotgun when unloading groceries from the car he seemed puzzled and when I pointed out that it's hard to operate a 12 ga when carrying a toddler to safety he seemed to be without an argument.
Long story short.....we always seem to think that the best choice for us is the best choice for everyone.

JustinJ
January 4, 2012, 02:18 PM
When I mentioned that his wife is not going to carry a shotgun when unloading groceries from the car he seemed puzzled and when I pointed out that it's hard to operate a 12 ga when carrying a toddler to safety he seemed to be without an argument.

I'm a little puzzled in imagining any foreseeable scenario in which a person would need to operate any firearm while carrying a toddler. For unloading groceries i assume a person would use their normal carry weapon. I don't think people who don't normally carry a gun or going to grab one to carrry on their person for chores around the house. For just about any gun one can imagine extremely unlikely situations in which it would not be ideal. Regardless, for bumps in the nights a shotgun beats a handgun. I don't have a disability but aside from those named "lefty" most disabled people could probably operate a rifle with three points of support more effectively than a handgun.

340PD
January 4, 2012, 07:00 PM
Shawn: The .327 is the only viable caliber that would work. I have shot thousands of rounds of wadcutters over 2.5 gr. of bullseye. It also gives them the option of going on to the magnum round as they got more proficient. Thanks.

Patriotme
January 4, 2012, 07:19 PM
I'm a little puzzled in imagining any foreseeable scenario in which a person would need to operate any firearm while carrying a toddler. For unloading groceries i assume a person would use their normal carry weapon. I don't think people who don't normally carry a gun or going to grab one to carrry on their person for chores around the house. For just about any gun one can imagine extremely unlikely situations in which it would not be ideal. Regardless, for bumps in the nights a shotgun beats a handgun. I don't have a disability but aside from those named "lefty" most disabled people could probably operate a rifle with three points of support more effectively than a handgun.
My coworker stated that a 12 ga was the best weapon for home defense. My point was (to him) that it's the best weapon for home defense when you have it with you and ready when needed. Also being physicaly able to handle the gun is a big help. He believed that HIS choice was the best choice for everyone because it worked for him and did not take the limitations of others into account.
I thought my post was pretty clear but I'll try again.
A shotgun may trump a handgun but that shotgun is most likely to be in a closet or corner when needed. Many of us carry concealed but how many carry a shotgun when unloading groceries or even Christmas presents from the car? How many people are seriously going to carry a shotgun around with them as they move throughout the house cooking dinner, doing laundry or talking on the phone? Not many. That shotgun will be in a corner or closet.
As for using a gun when carrying a todler.....if I (as an abusive and violent ex) decide to kick in my ex girlfriend's door she could carry a small child out the back while I enter the front door. She could have a gun in one hand and a child carrier in the other. She could also be on the phone with 911 while covering a door with a handgun. She could even have a handgun ready while getting in a car and attempting to leave. Good luck weilding that shotgun from behind the wheel. There's a lot of women out there buying handguns and they are doing so because they want something that will be at hand when it's needed. A shotgun is great when you have time to get it. A handgun is more likely to already be there.
The original post delt with infirmities and the fact that some people are limited in what they can use for self defense. A .22lr may be it for them. Many people have to struggle just to afford one gun and cannot afford a gun for every situation. In this case it's better to have a handgun which may be mediocre in a lot of situations instead of a shotgun which may be the best choice in one situation. I know people that can barely walk and have arthritis so bad they can barely function. Just because you can use a shotgun doesn't mean that everyone can.
I really think you missed my original point. Any gun is better than no gun in an emergency and some people will have to compromise in what they use. I used a coworker as an example of not thinking through what works for other people and was not trying to turn this into a shotgun vs handgun debate for home defense.

JustinJ
January 4, 2012, 07:31 PM
My coworker stated that a 12 ga was the best weapon for home defense. My point was (to him) that it's the best weapon for home defense when you have it with you and ready when needed. Also being physicaly able to handle the gun is a big help.
I thought my post was pretty clear but I'll try again.
A shotgun may trump a handgun but that shotgun is most likely to be in a closet or corner when needed. Many of us carry concealed but how many carry a shotgun when unloading groceries or even Christmas presents from the car? How many people are seriously going to carry a shotgun around with them as they move throughout the house cooking dinner, doing laundry or talking on the phone? Not many. That shotgun will be in a corner or closet.
As for using a gun when carrying a todler.....if I (as an abusive and violent ex) decide to kick in my ex girlfriend's door she could carry a small child out the back while I enter the front door. She could have a gun in one hand and a child carrier in the other. She could also be on the phone with 911 while covering a door with a handgun. There's a lot of women out there buying handguns and they are doing so because they want something that will be at hand when it's needed. A shotgun is great when you have time to get it. A handgun is more likely to already be there.

Except not everybody feels the need to carry a gun at all times while at home to begin with. In fact i would bet that very few people of the general population are willing to do so therefor regardless of what gun they have for home defense it will have to be fetched.

I'm not arguing that a shotgun is the be all end all gun for all potential scenarios and i think most of us agree that ideally a person will own both a shotgun and handgun. But if a person hears a bump in the night the majority will be far better suited by a shotgun than a handgun. I'm not going to reduce my ability to defend myself in order to hold a phone to my ear so after pressing 911 it should all be speaker phone from there.

hso
January 4, 2012, 07:39 PM
Am I way off base looking into the new Ruger LCR .22 as an option for some students?

IF you're talking about it as their sole defensive handgun you're not even in the ballpark. When you're trying to stop an attack the need is for greater stopping power. The .22 lacks that unless you get very good (or very lucky).

I've primarily taught women to shoot defensively and primarily shooting semiautos. Difficulty with cycling a slide is usually due to using the inferior body mechanics of trying to pull the slide back while holding the frame still instead of the better approach of pushing the frame forward while locking onto the slide with the off hand. With elbows locked into the sides and a solid grip on top of the slide I've had no failures with even frail older women pushing the frame forward to slide stop/release.

76shuvlinoff
January 4, 2012, 07:47 PM
I recently went through this dilemma searching for something for my anti semi-auto wife and daughter to have at home. I got some good advice both pro and con.

One pointed out that if a BG is looking at the wrong end of a revolver they are probably not going to be analyzing caliber. Then there were the usual, and understandable, arguments of .22lr vs the world.

I picked up a beater 4" DA .38 that passed the revolver check-out sticky. I worked it over (basically degunked it) lightened the main spring two coils and they both fell in love with it. They now have a competition going between them. Our next stop is a modern reliable 3-4" DA .357 house gun.

22-rimfire
January 4, 2012, 07:53 PM
Am I way off base looking into the new Ruger LCR .22 as an option for some students?

I personally don't think you're "way off base". But I would condition the recommendation that a larger centerfire caliber would be a lot more effective. If they choose a 22, stress that they need to practice and they need to choose the most reliable ammunition commonly available (probably CCI) rather than the cheapest bulk pack they can find at Walmart.

jwgml
January 4, 2012, 07:56 PM
S&W came out with the similar 43c model a year ago.

I Prefer double action revolvers for 22lr because of reliability. That being said, I have to agree with the crowd and recommend a larger caliber and the greater capacity of good pistol. We need to push ourselves and the people we care about out of the comfort zone. Training, Training, Training. Lives are at stake.

Pietro Beretta
March 2, 2012, 04:46 AM
I am probably going to get in trouble for posting this but, the recent Ohio incident left 3 people dead and 3 injured, he fired 10 shots from a Ruger Mk. III -- which is a .22.

Don't doubt the .22, not my first choice but it will do the job.

AJChenMPH
March 2, 2012, 03:20 PM
I am probably going to get in trouble for posting this but, the recent Ohio incident left 3 people dead and 3 injured, he fired 10 shots from a Ruger Mk. III -- which is a .22.
I was thinking of exactly the same incident when I first saw the title of this thread.

Back in my EMS days, I worked a shooting where the victim took a single .22 round just below the collarbone, no exit wound. It had hit an artery, and he bled out internally and died.

larryh1108
March 2, 2012, 06:19 PM
The OP said he teaches basic firearms courses. More than likely most of his students are new to handguns. Almost every post I read about teaching someone new about handguns is to recommend starting with a .22 until they get comfortable with it and then, when they feel comfortable and confident, they move up in caliber... at their pace.

Here we've gotten to a minimum carry caliber debate again. The OP has it right. Teach them on the .22 and let them decide when to move to bigger bullets. There is no point to teaching newbies with a .357 mag or whatever if they learn to not like the recoil and never persue carrying one or keeping one for SD. Even those "cute" .38 Specials in a snubby are pretty harsh to someone who never shot before. Let them learn, gain confidence and move on when they are ready. It is a natural progression and if they stay with the .22 and get proficient with it it's still better than never buying a handgun at all.

Saddlebag Preacher
March 2, 2012, 11:55 PM
Just looking at this from a retired cop's observation...Look at the damage John Hinkley did during the attempt to kill President Reagan. Dropped 2 cops and Brady wth one bullet each, and almost killed our president. The are nasty little rounds.

GEM
March 4, 2012, 07:22 PM
1. Check out www.corneredcat.com for training women to shoot larger calibers.
2. If that is all that can be handled because of infirmity, yes - of course. Better than no gun and will be much more successful than nothing but waving a frying pan like in some Lifetime Network Movie .
3. Shawn is on the money with the 632s. I bought one of the Pro-tac ones (SS, comped, hammer and longer barrel). It is a sweet heart to shoot with Longs and the 32 HR mags are fine. With it's grip size, it would be good for folks.
4. Similarly, you could could get a Model 60 with light loads.

Most criminals who take a round from them, would cease the action.

But, Pax has tips for the more powerful rounds as you can't argue that if they can shoot them - go for it.

gunsNgearguy
March 4, 2012, 10:41 PM
My wife had a really hard time chambering rounds in her glock. After looking at the corneredcat website she realized that she was trying to hold the gun steady with her grip hand while pulling the slide back with the other. To overcome this, she now holds the slide with her off hand and punches the grip/frame forward with the other.

Lawdawg45
March 5, 2012, 04:57 AM
340PD,

While the .22 wouldn't be my first choice, it's hard to deny the FBI data which shows more people are killed each year with a .22/.25. 8 well placed shots (which IS the key) of a hot .22 hollow point will end the fight, but not quickly in most cases. Absolutely go with the .22, learn trigger control and shot placement, then move up calibers when/if they are ready. BTW, my wife carries a 6 shot .22 mag. ;)

LD

Tex4426
March 5, 2012, 05:23 AM
There is no better self defense weapon than a 12 gauge..nut its kind of limited to the hope or car...anyways if all u can handle is a 22 then use that...with virtually no recoil u can fire 10 rounds pretty damn fast...I use a 9mm..I'm a big Guy and can pop off a 16 round clip at 10 yards in a 10 inch circle as fast as I can pull the trigger..and believe me if my life's on the line I wont stop shooting till u stop breathing

Certaindeaf
March 5, 2012, 11:17 AM
I think a service type caliber is even more warranted for a woman than that same platform used by a man.
Who wants to fend but were it to go there, and it probably will, women can't really fend as well as men. A normal man can usually fend well with the off hand while delivering damage with the gun. And were it to then to go into an all out death struggle/fight, one stands a better chance against an assailant being a man and one's adversary is ,hopefully, rapidly bleeding out.

Deaf Smith
March 5, 2012, 10:27 PM
Ruger LCP .22 for self defense?

For practice yes! In fact heck yes as the cost of .380 ammo is so high the .22 would pay for itself in short order.

But for defense? Well that's a mighty thin reed to stake your life on. So no. I have a S&W 2213 .22 that has something like a 2 1/2 barrel but I sure don't consider it my SD gun!

Yes it can be used for SD but it is not my pick at all.

Deaf

BLACKHAWKNJ
March 6, 2012, 12:07 AM
First Rule of Gunfighting (per Jeff Cooper)-"Have a gun".
Elmer Keith responded to a reader's letter asking about what Elmer considered
a "mouse gun" by saying it wasn't his cup of tea "but it sure beats your fists."
Or feet, or foul language.
And a hit with a 22 hurts a lot more than a miss with a .357 or 45.

GEM
March 6, 2012, 10:16 AM
IIRC, Keith also said a 22 is small until it is pointed at you.

TimboKhan
March 7, 2012, 02:30 AM
I am going to parrot the reasonable middle ground: Not the best choice, but it can do in a pinch. Really, it's biggest downside is the ability to reliably stop someone immediately. Many, many people have died because of the lowly .22. I am guessing a significantly small percentage of those people died instanty.

Not to sound pompous, but my goal with a handgun in a defensive situation is to stop the threat, not kill someone slowly over time. Fact is, I don't want to kill anyone, but if I need to protect myself, I want them on the ground as quickly as possible, and a .22 isn't likely to do that.

Take away the defensive angle, and I (along with roughly a bazillion other people) believe the .22 is the most versatile cartridge there is. I would take a .22 over any other caliber in a survival situation, unless that situation is fighting bears or something unrelaistic.

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