YouTube videos..


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BellyUpFish
January 5, 2012, 08:22 PM
I've been watching a few videos tonight and have made a few of my own, but I'm curious, anyone have any guesses as to why people go to such extravagant lengths to demonstrate in the video that the gun is not loaded?

I understand ensuring the firearm is clear prior to making the video, but why is everyone making such efforts to ensure the viewer sees this?

Is it the fear of "I saw BillyBobGunSmith handling a gun on YouTube and did it just like he did, 'cept now I'm dead!"

Anyone?

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lowerunit411
January 5, 2012, 08:27 PM
because safety is prime...that simple

signalzero
January 5, 2012, 08:32 PM
Some viewers will skip videos where the owner does not do a proper safety check on screen.

hso
January 5, 2012, 08:33 PM
Because so many morons don't.

BellyUpFish
January 5, 2012, 08:34 PM
Some viewers will skip videos where the owner does not do a proper safety check on screen.

Why? An audible "this weapon is has been safety checked" is not sufficient?

signalzero
January 5, 2012, 08:39 PM
Why? An audible "this weapon is has been safety checked" is not sufficient?
I don't know for sure. In some of the comments I've read it has to do with the viewer not trusting the author of the video.

RNB65
January 5, 2012, 08:41 PM
Because demonstrating safe handling is every firearm owner's responsibility.

David G.
January 5, 2012, 08:41 PM
Because safety is awesome!

BellyUpFish
January 5, 2012, 08:42 PM
I don't know for sure. In some of the comments I've read it has to do with the viewer not trusting the author of the video.

That's odd.. I mean, I could understand if we were all sitting a room with an individual who was twirling a weapon around and no one knew the state of the weapon, or even if we all knew and still some numbskull was twirling it around..

I guess I just don't see the issue with someone saying "this weapon is clear.." and moving on with the show..

Different strokes I guess..

Sam1911
January 5, 2012, 08:43 PM
Because if they don't show clear, the first 17,000 comments will be -- "MAKE SURE THAT GUN IS UNLOADED!!!"

As they should. Safety is JOB ONE. We need to be reminding each other of it religiously.

There's enough useless and dangerous gun stuff shown on YouTube. Taking a moment to demonstrate a clear weapon might just set you off as someone who knows his butt from his muzzle and who might be worth listening to.

BellyUpFish
January 5, 2012, 08:44 PM
Because demonstrating safe handling is every firearm owner's responsibility.
Yeh, I'm not debating that, or anything at all here, really. I'm down with safety.

forindooruseonly
January 5, 2012, 09:08 PM
Cause lots of people who are just getting into shooting are watching youtube videos, and they emulate what they see. So if they think it's normal to religiously check their gun to make sure it's clear when handling it, all the better as far as I'm concerned.

BellyUpFish
January 5, 2012, 09:23 PM
All good points.. :)

HDCamel
January 5, 2012, 10:16 PM
I think what OP is talking about isn't the people who just safety check on camera, but point out super specifically what they're doing in each step of the safety check and point the camera into the chamber or the magwell, etc. Basically, spending an inordinate amount of time safety checking to get ever nook and cranny visible on camera.

Dropping the magazine and racking the slide once or twice or (if a revolver) swinging out the cylinder and maybe slapping the ejector should be sufficient.

forindooruseonly
January 6, 2012, 01:03 AM
I think what OP is talking about isn't the people who just safety check on camera, but point out super specifically what they're doing in each step of the safety check and point the camera into the chamber or the magwell, etc. Basically, spending an inordinate amount of time safety checking to get ever nook and cranny visible on camera.

Dropping the magazine and racking the slide once or twice or (if a revolver) swinging out the cylinder and maybe slapping the ejector should be sufficient.

Maybe. My point still stands, as does most of the others on here. And for the record, simply racking the slide after removing the magazine doesn't mean a gun is safe. Ever seen a broken or stuck extractor leave a round in the chamber? You need to look in the chamber.

I'd rather have safety exaggerated on youtube, rather than just doing what is "sufficient". People learn from those videos, especially ones like Hickok45 (I have some issues with some things he does, but safety isn't one) that attract a lot of attention - from new shooters and from kids. And in the scheme of things, does it really bother you that much to sit through an extra thirty seconds of someone checking their firearm?

HDCamel
January 6, 2012, 01:37 AM
Even adding a visual inspection (which I simply forgot to list, but never forget to do) and even a finger inspection to that, it should only take 5 to 7 seconds tops.

30 seconds is just a waste of everybody's time. Including novice shooters.

Route666
January 7, 2012, 02:34 AM
I find it a little annoying, but at the same time I'm glad that (almost) everyone is doing it, it helps pass on the importance of safety, and the rules to follow. Not to mention it at least makes a good case for how safe and responsible firearms owners really are.

mark1616
January 7, 2012, 03:07 AM
The more we promote safety, the less we have to hear from gun control nuts about how guns are too dangerous for private ownership.

But a quick demonstration should only take a couple seconds and not deter from the subject at hand.

Snowdog
January 7, 2012, 03:34 AM
I find it perfectly acceptable for the viewer to presume the video's creator already practices safe gun handling and isn't a dimwit. I know this might not be the most agreeable comment to make, but I really don't care to watch someone meticulously demonstrate the firearm in the video I'm watching is unloaded.

It's one thing to watch a firearm-related video and witness some stupid stuff (accidentally sweeping others, finger on the trigger, etc). Safety is paramount, there's not denying that.
If the video records some unsafe behavior, then I can certainly understand the viewer "outrage".
However, when someone is showing something specific and not necessarily shooting related, such as methods of applying a cold blue or some such thing, I find it absolutely asinine to make such comments. It really rubs me the wrong way.

Because if they don't show clear, the first 17,000 comments will be -- "MAKE SURE THAT GUN IS UNLOADED!!!

And I believe that's what it boils down to. Anticipating a backlash if they don't visually show the viewer an empty chamber, they do just that. It's hard to foster a productive group discussion when self-appointed cyber range officers are hijacking the comment section with demands for visual proof of empty chambers (in caps, of course).


If someone starts the video by saying he's the only one in the room qualified with a particular caliber, then yes... by all means, show us an empty mag well and slide locked to the rear to put us at ease. Otherwise, let's just assume the fellow who created the video has half a brain and practices general gun safety unless he proves otherwise.

FreddyKruger
January 7, 2012, 03:43 AM
Its the YouTube community in general... so many users think they need to go on every video and point everything out and then compare it to something unrelated.

Its also the people that write their own memoir in a comment to somehow put merit into some crap they said. you know what im talking about...

Skribs
January 7, 2012, 03:51 AM
If I see someone who spends more than 20% of the video safety checking, I will complain in the comments. I didn't click on the video to watch them show how much they know about safety. I clicked on it because I wanted to see what the video was about (usually a review). If I were doing a video, I wouldn't bother to safety-check on camera because that would be a waste of the viewer's time. I might put it in text on the video that it was safety checked before hand (if I even did, I keep my firearms loaded so I KNOW they're loaded).

The only time I want to see it is if someone is about to show how to do something on the gun that requires it to be empty. And then I want to see 5-7 seconds, not 30 seconds.

BellyUpFish
January 7, 2012, 08:30 AM
That's kinda how I feel.. I was watching a review of a holster and the guy had 3 firearms laying on the table.

Went through a pretty lengthy clearing process, at which time I started skipping forward.

Plan2Live
January 7, 2012, 09:07 AM
The only reason I see to perform the safety check on camera is becasue there are lots of people watching Youtube that have never handled a firearm before and maybe, just maybe seeing this performed will sink in and save a life someday. But doing it once with a quick verbal exlanation that you should always verify a weapon is safe should be enough.

Similarly, some of the gun shows on the Outdoor Channel will sometimes pop up a disclaiming when filming from the muzzle end of a weapon "Remote Camera" which is a semi-subliminal cue to never stand in front of a weapon. Unless an ex-buddy of mine down in Florida is firing that weapon and in that case, standing right in front of him is probably the safest place to stand. He can't hit the broadside of a barn.

303tom
January 7, 2012, 10:02 AM
I've been watching a few videos tonight and have made a few of my own, but I'm curious, anyone have any guesses as to why people go to such extravagant lengths to demonstrate in the video that the gun is not loaded?

I understand ensuring the firearm is clear prior to making the video, but why is everyone making such efforts to ensure the viewer sees this?

Is it the fear of "I saw BillyBobGunSmith handling a gun on YouTube and did it just like he did, 'cept now I'm dead!"

Anyone?
Because that is RULE#1.....................

Sam1911
January 7, 2012, 11:56 AM
there are lots of people watching Youtube that have never handled a firearm before and maybe, just maybe seeing this performed will sink in and save a life somedayYou know, I think there's a lot in this.

We all know every 16 year old budding gun geek wants to dress and act like the "power users" he sees. Some of that is really annoying, as the "tactical act" he copied out of a MagPul team training video is unnecessary on the plinking range with the .22s.

But a lot of it is useful -- I'd rather a new shooter at least tried to copy what Jarrett or Miculek do in their videos (how they stand, how they move, how they set up their firing grip, etc.) than maybe the cup-&-saucer junk Uncle Jim showed them with that old H&R revolver he shoots about twice every five years...

So, maybe, if they see enough "professionals" and knowledgeable enthusiasts religiously clearing every weapon they touch, maybe they'll mimic that habit themselves -- even if only so they can look like a "pro." I don't care WHY they're racking slides and checking chambers, as long as they're DOING IT.

Matt018
January 7, 2012, 05:49 PM
I think that a feel check is BS if you cant see a hunk of brass in the chamber is there then you need to get off the firing line. This is also even more pointless on shotguns with an enormous ejection port.

Sam1911
January 7, 2012, 07:30 PM
I think that a feel check is BS if you cant see a hunk of brass in the chamber ...

It's a good habit to be in. Not all the ammo we all fire these days is bright shiny brass. Not every time we open the gun will the sun be shining bright into the action.

Plenty of folks have jacked the action open, glanced into the chamber, closed it up, and then fired a negligent discharge right into the ground! It happens.

That's why we say LAYERS of safety and habitual safety practices we use for all guns.

230RN
January 7, 2012, 10:03 PM
Why? An audible "this weapon is has been safety checked" is not sufficient?

No. Like Doubting Thomas (my favorite Saint), I too refuse to believe without personal*visual and manual demonstration verification.

I don't know how many gun counter folks I've insulted when I refused to take a gun with an unopened action from them when they try to hand it to me... even though I had seen them inspect it.

"But it's not loaded, I just checked it."

"Nuts to that, brother. Don't hand me a closed gun."

Then you read about him bitching about that a-hole customer on one of the dumb customer threads.

Fine. I'm an a-hole when it comes down to gun handling, and I'd rather watch a couple of seconds of detailed clearing instructions on videos. To paraphrase our nanny-type legislators, "If it saves one ND, it's worth it."

Frankly, I do not understand how somebody can reasonably object to it.



By the way, I can attest that racking the slide does not guarantee a clear chamber. I had a broken extractor tip on my 1911 which operated normally all day, and when I racked that slide a couple of times on returning to camp, nothing came out.

BANG! at an innocent fence post. I found the broken extractor tip on my work bench the day after.

That was sure one loud "click," I tell you whut.



Terry, 230RN

*the word "personal" added pursuant to Post 32

tactidrool
January 8, 2012, 12:04 AM
Because the viewer is like a guest coming over to your house to take a look at your gun. Maybe you safety checked it before your guest arrived, but to be courteous to them and to have them also know that the gun has been checked before it's being handled and shown off, it's nice to show them.

Additionally, if your guest doesn't know much about guns, the emphasis on safety, to teach them that gun owners do take it seriously, is nice. I remember when I was just getting into guns, seeing people take the extra emphasis to safety check them left a nice impression on me, even though safety was already drilled into me by my dad.

Skribs
January 8, 2012, 01:03 AM
230RN, I'm a little bit confused here. So if I check the gun and it's empty, and hand it to you with the action closed, you can't simply keep it pointed in a safe direction and pull the action back yourself? As long as it is pointed in a safe direction the entire time, and we all keep our fingers out of the trigger guard and treat it like it could be loaded, I don't see the big deal.

Tactidrool, it is nothing like that. If the guy on Youtube has an ND, sucks for him, but I'm separated from the incident by both time and place. And nobody in their right mind would upload a video as a review or instructional kit if they shot themselves in the process, that would be edited out.

atomd
January 8, 2012, 09:11 AM
It seems there's people that watch gun videos solely to point out anything that they consider unsafe handling. I think a lot of people in the community are strongly opinionated and will take any opportunity to tell you how they know more than you about something gun-related. If they can point out how you are being unsafe they think it makes them looker smarter and more responsible. Maybe it's an ego thing.

For instance, go look at say...bicycle review videos. You won't see as many people fighting and calling each other names, telling the video poster that their brand bike is a piece of garbage and they don't know anything about that product or how to handle it properly. Sure there's some of that (it is the internet afterall)....but in almost every single gun video you get all that and a whole lot more.

I've seen videos where they are talking about a pistol. They drop the magazine and rack the slide 10 or more times and then point the camera into the chamber. It didn't become any safer from the 9th time to the 10th time they racked it. It's just silliness and a waste of everyone's time.

I'm all for being safe and everyone should use and promote gun safety when they can but I think a lot of people go way overboard. In the end I feel like they just like pointing out the shortcomings of others to make themselves feel better. All the fighting, brand wars, and foaming at the mouth safety nuts are part of the reason why I spend less time on forums/videos/etc than I used to.

BellyUpFish
January 8, 2012, 11:11 AM
No. Like Doubting Thomas (my favorite Saint), I too refuse to believe without visual and manual demonstration.

You apparently refuse to believe with visual and manual demonstration as well..

WNTFW
January 8, 2012, 01:35 PM
Bellyupfish,
Can you post some links of your youtube videos? I have no videos as I can't shoot, am ugly and my mother dresses me weird.

I know safety is important. Just what is overkill to some is just not enough for others. Then you have people that have been safe for years get complacent. So erring on the side of caution and limiting liability is the name of the game.

I have seen guys with pretty good videos get argumentative/negative comments. Even guy with a bunch of good videos have there detractors.

Some pet peeves about shooting videos for me are:
- 30 second video is 28 seconds of putzing around and finally 2 seconds of "action"
- sound; 28 seconds of wind buffeting the the 2 seconds or can't hear, too loud, can't hear, too loud or too much of a soundtrack.
- way too much sales pitch and too little getting to the point.
- showing only a shooter shooting and no results.
- To much "branding" with too long of an intro and graphics. If the content is good I will be back and search for more from them.

I do see some videos that are pretty well done at times.

BellyUpFish
January 8, 2012, 02:37 PM
I don't have many, and they are far from a "Nutnfancy" quality, but sure..

I'm on my phone and YouTube is only giving me the mobile link, see if this works:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Afxdko6rhPg&feature=youtube_gdata_player

1911crazy
January 8, 2012, 05:10 PM
"We all know every 16 year old budding gun geek wants to dress and act like the "power users" he sees."

hey i'm 15 and love shooting .45s

Blackstone
January 8, 2012, 08:23 PM
Because people will nitpick things like that as it makes them feel better about themselves.

(not clearing guns in videos, that is)

TwoWheelFiend
January 8, 2012, 11:44 PM
well said RNB65

230RN
January 9, 2012, 07:21 AM
....

fpgt72
January 9, 2012, 08:58 AM
Youtube is very....well we will just leave it at that. There are plenty of people that should not be allowed to have the loaded "gun" that god gave them in their pants putting on firearm videos.

That all said what chaps me more then anything is the youtube experts....you know the ones that THINK they know what they are talking about but actually have no clue.

fatcat4620
January 9, 2012, 09:41 AM
The safety check is the last of my concerns on youtube. Some people blather on for 15 min before they get to the gun or the safety check.

230RN
January 20, 2012, 05:47 AM
Deleted by poster

FIVETWOSEVEN
January 20, 2012, 01:13 PM
But a lot of it is useful -- I'd rather a new shooter at least tried to copy what Jarrett or Miculek do in their videos (how they stand, how they move, how they set up their firing grip, etc.) than maybe the cup-&-saucer junk Uncle Jim showed them with that old H&R revolver he shoots about twice every five years...

That's how I learned to shoot handguns, online research and videos. I've never gotten formal training with handguns ever and I only remember shooting them in 4H once and that wasn't much either.

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