9.3x62 vs. 375 H&H


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clancy12
January 8, 2012, 07:07 PM
I am planning on buying a new medium-bore CZ 550, either an American Safari Magnum in 375 H&H or an American in 9.3x62 Mauser. My question is: how does the accuracy compare between the two rifles? I'm not talking super long range accuracy, but out to about 300yds or so. If anyone has experience with either of these rifles, input would be appreciated.

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Hizzie
January 8, 2012, 07:39 PM
From what I've read both are pretty damn close accuracy wise. Loaded ammo, brass and bullets are more available for .375 H&H. More bullet options for .375 as well. For CZ work check out http://hunting-rifles.com/

steve4102
January 9, 2012, 12:45 AM
I have a CZ American in 9.3 x 62, I have no first hand experience with the 375. My 9.3 is probably the most accurate rifle I own, (I have many). I like the way it shoots and I like the way it fits and feels. It not only is my most accurate rifle, I would have to say it is also my favorite.
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y17/steve4102/BigGame.jpg

nanuk-O-dah-Nort
January 9, 2012, 05:53 AM
I too have a 9.3x62

what I like is it compares favorably with the .375HH regarding penetration, is lots big in diameter for large game, and needs far less powder. Brass is readily formed from standard -06 headsized brass

What is not to like?

gunner69
January 9, 2012, 11:14 PM
I have a CZ 550FS, in 9.3x62, and it shot my first try in a reload to less than 1" at 100 yards with a Leopold 2-7 VX-R firedot scope. Killed a doe at 85 yards, verified by my Simmons rangefinder, with one 286gr Nosler slug. NO meat damage at all....... I highly recommend this caliber. Trivia: This caliber is a favorite "dangerous game" caliber in Asia and Africa.

tahoe2
January 10, 2012, 01:21 AM
I believe the 9.3 would be a flatter trajectory but a better bullet selection in 375 H & H.
Personally the 9.3 has always peaked my interest, it seems to be 375 class power without the " recoil " (that works for me).

TGReaper
January 10, 2012, 09:38 PM
I expect that the 9.3 is a good cartridge, I do not believe that it is as good a cartridge as the .375 H&H. With bullet weights available to the hand loader ranging from 200 to 300 grains and a trajectory ( depending on the load) about the same as a 30-06 the .375 H&H is a hard act to follow and no 9.3 will pry me loose from my Super Express H&H.
TGR

Watergoat
January 10, 2012, 11:56 PM
My CZ 550 American is great! 3 shot clusters at 100, 5 shots in 1 1/2 at 200 with most bullets. Recoil is more a push than a whack. No belt to possibly cause feeding problems, and 1 more round in the mag. Bullets aren't hard to get, see Midway. RL 15 is your friend, Varget is about as good. Guy on the Ruger forum says he runs 375 bullets thru a 366 Lee bullet sizing die, they shoot fine. He has killed a LOT of stuff with his 9.3s. Cases no problem, available from most major makers, even Winchester now. You can also expand the necks of 30-06, possibly a mild fireform, and make them that way. Ruger is now making rifles, too. I myself would stay with the CZ. Did you know they come with a standard set trigger?

MASTARBLASTER
December 3, 2012, 05:44 AM
I too am interested in the CZ550 in 9.3x62 as a North American DG rifle, specifically to stalk and shoot wild boars at close range , less than 50 yards. However, I want to be able to feed my hunting habit, without any concern for bullet cost or at least reducing per round cost for the 9.3x62 which is quite expensive in comparison to shooting .223 for most factory ammo. I reload for my other firearms and even considered the possibility of using a .357 dia. 180 gr. pistol bullet and crimp the brass on a .366 dia. 9.3 x 62 case to save costs in making an inexpensive
hog blasting bullet that would fire at approx, 3100 fps. This reloading recipe at this stage was just my guestimation of velocity and practicality. I hesitate on this because of questions and safety concerns about potential excessive pressure. Thus my interest in how does that "guy on Ruger" or anybody else who is knowlegeable
about internal ballistics, make a .375 brass bullet function in a .366 dia. bore rifle ? Can a 357. dia 180 gr. pistol bullet function atop 43 gr. 4350 as a hog round ? Explain.

Gtscotty
December 3, 2012, 06:48 AM
Well first of all, no centerfire is going to be as cheap to shoot as a .223, especially one that throws 286 gr bullets. Material costs alone are obviously going to make the 9.3 more expensive to shoot, that said, it will also be far more potent than any .223 round.

Swaging .375 bullets down to .366 is one thing because you are basically forcing a larger bullet (.375) through a bullet sizing die in order to extrude it to a smaller diameter (.366). Your only real concerns here would be ensuring that your final diameter was appropriate to your bore, and that the lead core and copper jacket have had a similar amount of spring-back.... which they don't but it seems like lots of folks have done it successfully, so maybe its not too big of a deal.

As for using a .357 bullet in a 9.3, that idea will not work. even if you crimp a .357 bullet into a 9.3 case, the bullet will still be too small for the rifle's bore. At the very least this will result in a slow load with poor accuracy, but it could also lead to a dangerous situation. Basically, this idea is a no go, but if you really want to shoot .357 bullets in a rifle, why not just get a 35 Whelen? The Whelen would allow you to do exactly what you're describing here.

These are the cheapest bullets made for the 9.3, and should work fine for hogs.

http://www.grafs.com/retail/catalog/product/productId/12622

Although they are currently out of stock, Grafs usually has them available, and I imagine they will be back in stock before too long.

Additionally, if you really want an american made bullet, the speer is the most affordable in this caliber.

http://www.grafs.com/retail/catalog/product/productId/17300

Here's a link to a post from a guy that's swaging 375 to 9.3, it seems like there is a little machining involved in opening up the dies.

http://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?28733-Swaging-375-s-to-9-3mm

If all of this is still too expensive, you might want to consider sticking with .223, or maybe giving .308 a try.

Boxhead
December 3, 2012, 01:18 PM
I have a fair amount of experience using both rounds for 15 years or so. For your needs I would go the 9.3 and not look back. Graf's sells 286 gr Prvi's cheap and they will work just fine for you. Another very good bullet is the 250 gr AB. I have hunted with the 250 gr X (original one) exclusively since I put my rifle together so the TSX would be excellent as well though more costly and not necessary. The 375 is a fine round, one of the finest, but not needed for your use and requires a rifle of more bulk, again not needed IMO. I like the Ruger African for a 9.3.

Flatbush Harry
December 3, 2012, 06:17 PM
I wrestled with that choice and, ultimately, decided on the .375 H&H due to likely greater availability of loaded ammo anywhere I went to hunt. I'm a hand loader but could imagine easily how my home-mades might not meet me at my destination.

While the CZ550 was on my short list, I ended up getting a Rem 700 XCR II. I restocked it with a Bell & Carlson Medalist Sporter stock in the Weatherby style. Having shot big Weatherby's I like the MonteCarlo and the cast-off to help manage recoil. My smith glass-bedded it and it shoots wonderfully.

This target, with its 0.486" 100-yard 3-shot group was the product of my load of 69.0 gr of Reloder 15 in new R-P cases over a CCI LR Magnum primer under a Nosler AccuBond 260gr bullet. This is the Nosler manual's most accurate powder, most accurate load for that bullet -- I think they got it right.

http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j126/flatbush_harry/sc01c8757d.jpg

Load development for North America is now completed. I recommend all the above unreservedly.

BTW, I scoped this rifle with one of my Zeiss Conquest 3-9x40 scopes using Leupold QR bases and rings for easy scope removal for traveling. I will likely get a second scope, probably a Leupold 1.5-6x, also mounted in Leupy QR rings for interchangeability.

All this said, either caliber and rifle will serve you well.

Good luck and good hunting,

FH

nanuk-O-dah-Nort
December 4, 2012, 01:49 AM
availability of 9.3x62 is predicated on location.

and in North America, it is getting more popular all the time.

and if you want to use smaller bullets, find some cast in .359 to .360 and paper patch them.

any cast for the Whelen will usually patch fine in the 9.3

a-sheepdog
December 26, 2012, 10:55 PM
I have a Ruger Hawkeye African in 9.3x62 with a Zeiss Conquest 3-9x40, it is lights out accurate with 4 shot groups at 100 under an inch. I shot a mulie at just a tad under 300 yards and he looked like he just fell over. Extremely accurate rifle ang a great round.

planetmobius
December 26, 2012, 11:08 PM
I have a Husqvarna and a Mannlicher Schoenaur both in 9.3 and a Browning Safari in 375. Both are fantastic calibers and I would not fault your for buying either. In terms of accuracy, both are more accurate than I am. I favor the 9.3 for North America because of the shorter action, lighter rifles and super cool European styling of the rifles (including your CZ). The 9.3 is balistically equivalent to a 35 whelen or 350 Rem mag. It is enough gun for anything on the continent include big bear. While you wont find the components on the shelf at gander Mountain, they are plentiful due to its wild popularity in Europe and other places. Your gun shop can easily order whatever you need.

browningguy
December 27, 2012, 12:11 AM
Both calibers are excellent, however keep in mind a few countries in Africa still insist on .375" minimum for dangerous game, while a few others will accept the 9.3 x 62.

Float Pilot
December 27, 2012, 12:19 AM
The 9.3 x 62mm is becoming more popular up here in Alaska, although it is still not a common cartridge.
I like both..

The 9.3 mmm has two advantages....

NO MAGNUM BELT (more reliable from the magazine if you are stressed)
MORE ROUNDS IN THE MAGAZINE

The 375 H&H has one advantage
IT IS BIGGER

nanuk-O-dah-Nort
December 27, 2012, 09:19 AM
planetmobius wrote: ....The 9.3 is balistically equivalent to a 35 whelen or 350 Rem mag.....



no... not really, when you look at it via the numbers, it is more closer to the .375HH than the 35W, and when you hear the PH's talk, it is quite a bit more than the 35W.

the way I heard it was the 6.2 is to the Whelen as the 30.06 is to the 270W

valnar
December 27, 2012, 10:08 AM
9.3 is the biggest I would want to shoot. It can take anything in North America. Unless you actually, truly have plans to spend thousands of dollars on a trip to Africa, I'd say skip the 375 H&H. That "what if" scenario will not come true for most of us.

Robert
December 27, 2012, 10:14 AM
Think of it like this, a 375 loaded with 270gr bullets has very similar flight path to a 180gr 30-06. And is pretty dang accurate, well at least my Winchester Safari Express is.

BigG
December 27, 2012, 10:17 AM
375 H&H is commonly available in case you need to buy some. Don't know about the other cartridge but I doubt it. So my pick is the 375 H&H.

CraigC
December 27, 2012, 11:13 AM
Unless you actually, truly have plans to spend thousands of dollars on a trip to Africa, I'd say skip the 375 H&H.
People seem to think you need piles of money laying around to hunt Africa. When in actuality, you can fly to African and hunt four or five plains game species for less than the cost of many domestic elk hunts. Unless you are a moron, you are almost guaranteed a measure of success in Africa. I've heard of guys hunting elk half a dozen times before they got a bull.

PabloJ
December 27, 2012, 11:21 AM
I am planning on buying a new medium-bore CZ 550, either an American Safari Magnum in 375 H&H or an American in 9.3x62 Mauser. My question is: how does the accuracy compare between the two rifles? I'm not talking super long range accuracy, but out to about 300yds or so. If anyone has experience with either of these rifles, input would be appreciated.
Look for 9.3x62 CZ with sightless barrel and Kevlar reinforced stock. I think they call that American model. Those are very good handling guns. The .375 Ruger Hawkeye African handles very nicely so perhaps the 9,3x62 is also wonderful.

jmr40
December 27, 2012, 11:39 AM
9.3 is the biggest I would want to shoot. It can take anything in North America. Unless you actually, truly have plans to spend thousands of dollars on a trip to Africa,

The 9.3, 35 Whelen, 338-06 and several others are good rounds for the guy who just wants to be different. They work, and work well, but a 300 mag, even 30-06 will easily take anything in North America as well as any African plains game with much cheaper, easier to find ammo, and do it with LESS recoil. Even the 300 mags.

From a practical standpoint I'd go straght to a 375 if I felt the need for more than a 30-06 or 300 mag. Everything in between is splitting hairs for performance gains. The 375 is the next step up in performance. If you ever plan on hunting truly large, dangerous game the 375 would be the minimum

On the other hand the 9.3, 35 Whelen, and 338-06 are all fun rounds to own, perform reasonably well on larger game, come in more compact rifles and do offer 1-2 more rounds in the magazine. They are not unreasonably overkill for smaller game either.

From a practical view the 375 gets the nod. The 9.3 for the cool factor.

BigG
December 27, 2012, 02:20 PM
As JMR40 said, the 375 is the next step up from the 30/06 which is itself adequate for all North American game. The 9.3 x 62 is similar to a necked up 30/06 which is what a 35 Whelen is, also.

I would go with 375 or else stay with the 30/06 as I never felt I had to be different. I like buying ammo that is available and cheap.

Gtscotty
December 27, 2012, 05:31 PM
I'm certainly not an experienced African hunter, but I do shoot 9.3x62 and 30-06, and I used to shoot 35 Whelen. The 9.3 is definitely a decent step up from the 30-06, and is also a smaller, but still noteworthy step up from the 35 Whelen. My current 30-06 load is a 165gr projectile at somewhere around 2900 fps, while my current 9.3x62 load is a 285gr at 2400 fps (after backing it down some).

Even though the difference in energy between these two loads is significant, I don't think it conveys how different these two rounds really are. While the .375 h&h is obviously more powerful than the 9.3, the 9.3 can deliver most of the power of the .375 in a smaller lighter package with more rounds on tap. If the OP is fine with a larger rifle, I'm sure a .375 H&H will serve him well, but if he wants something a little more svelte the 9.3 may be just the ticket... either way it really should not be dismissed as "pretty much a 30-06".

gunner69
December 28, 2012, 12:35 AM
Shot another doe, one shot from the 9.3x62, two steps and dead. It may be over 100 years old, it may be slow by todays standards, but the 9.3 KILLS. :neener:

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