Load for 40 cal


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ssmacar
January 8, 2012, 07:51 PM
Looking for a good load for a 180 grain lead RNFP. Shooting defensive pistol so something that allows for fast back on target, THANKS

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billybob44
January 8, 2012, 09:44 PM
You're not going to get too many "Recipes" for your 180gr. load on this forum.
Not many of us want to take a chance of being "Introduced" to your Attorneys..:scrutiny::confused:
I would recommend that you go to Hodgdon's Load Data site for info on your .40 S&W.
Also, the hardness of your lead makes all the difference/as does the sized diameter of your bullets, to the speed that you need to drive these bullets to for the most accuracy and the least lead left in your barrel.:uhoh:
For #'s, I would start with around a third of a dozen grains of TiteGroup powder with your 180gr. lead, and work up from there...Clear as Mud???:what:..Bill...;)



PS: Welcome to THR--Have Fun+Speak Up...Just saw that you have been around here for awhile=You just don't talk much?? HA HA....

J_McLeod
January 8, 2012, 09:56 PM
Try the Lyman #49. Lots of good info for a 180gr there.

Stormin.40
January 8, 2012, 10:07 PM
Like others have said check out some manuals. I like HS-6 for all my .40 loads which includes 180 gr LRNFP, pleasant to shoot and accurate.

gamestalker
January 8, 2012, 10:58 PM
HS6 and Longshot provide everything I need for the .40 S&W. Longshot in my opinion is a better powder for heavier bullets, where as HS6 seems to be a better performer for the lighter bullets. But I have no idea what works well with lead bullets, I only load jacketed stuff.

gahunter12
January 8, 2012, 11:05 PM
I don't want to Hijack this thread but I'm confused a little. I understand that its not a good idea to depend on whats posted unless you can verify it with a reliable sorce. Hince manuals. Am I missing something with the 180gr. bullets? Are they more dangerous than 165 because of presures? The reason I ask is I'm getting ready to purchase my bullets to reload my 40's, and planned on going with 180gr since thats what I carry. I'm new to reloading and have been reading manuals for nearly a year now. I just received my equipment and hope to start working up some loads. I'm not really interested in loading max loads, but moderate good shooting loads. Would the 165's be better for me? Thanks for the info! Great fourm.

john wall
January 8, 2012, 11:36 PM
I prefer Titegroup for light loads in the 40. BTW, if using a firearm with a Polygonal barrel, lead bullets are not recommended.

Go to the Hodgdon site and pick a load.

Unique is also a very good powder for lead bullets in most any caliber.

gunlaw
January 8, 2012, 11:36 PM
Pick up a good reloading manuel and try AA#5 or Power Pistol. HS-6 works well also.

J_McLeod
January 8, 2012, 11:41 PM
HS-6 is my favorite.

Hamish
January 8, 2012, 11:49 PM
I like to use tightgroup for my .40 S&W loads. I have a load that I like for plated 180 gr. RNFP that I shoot out of my gen. 4 Glock 23 (with a KKM Precision barrel). Recently, I acquired a Sig Sauer P226 in .40 S&W, and found that the loads I liked in my G23 would not reliably cycle the action in the P226. The Sig has a heavier recoil spring, and with the loads I used flawlessly in my G23 I would get a lot of stovepipes in the P226. I worked up a hotter load for the P226, still using tightgroup and the same 180 gr. RNFP bullets I used before. They cycle flawlessly in the P226 and the G23 now, and I still load below the maximum # of grains suggested by my manual(s).

My point is, even if someone does give you their special recepie, it may not work in your pistol. You should work up your own load based upon the parameters found within one or more reloading manuals. Start at the minimum, and work your way up until you find what works for you.

BTW, I've tried other powders, without as much success. Tightgroup works well for me.

rem22long40x
January 9, 2012, 12:31 AM
I shoot 180's with Green Dot

steve4102
January 9, 2012, 12:52 AM
I shoot/load 180's in my CZ.
For light loads, WST.
For medium to upper medium, Silhouette.
For high power max loads, Longshot.

Stay clear of very fast powders with max loads and you will be fine.

bds
January 9, 2012, 01:27 AM
Looking for a good load for a 180 grain lead RNFP. Shooting defensive pistol so something that allows for fast back on target
By "defensive pistol" and "something that allows for fast back on target", I am thinking you are match shooing in IDPA?

For full-power JHP loads, many would suggest Unique or slower burning powders (I personally prefer WSF). For lead target loads, W231/HP-38 or faster burning powders would work. Disclaimer: Since there is no currently published lead 40S&W load data for W231/HP-38/Promo/Red Dot, use the following at your own risk.

I have primarily used 180 gr in TCFP nose profile with lead bullets (Missouri IDP #5) at 1.125" OAL with .421" taper crimp and fed/chambered well in pistols I have used. As others posted, with your RNFP bullet, you would need to determine the OAL that will feed/chamber reliably in your pistol/barrel from the magazine. In my Glock 22/27 with Lone Wolf barrels, 3.8-4.1 gr of W231/HP-38 with 180 gr lead bullet produced mild recoil yet very accurate target loads. 4.2-4.5 gr produced moderate recoil yet very accurate target loads.

Hodgdon's jacketed load data.
180 gr Hornady XTP W231/HP-38 OAL 1.125" Start 4.1 gr (797 fps) 23,800 PSI - Max 5.0 gr (947 fps) 32,900 PSI

Lyman #49 lists the following:
175 gr lead bullet W231 OAL 1.125" Start 4.3 gr (863 fps) 15,400 CUP - Max 5.8 gr (977 fps) 22,500 CUP

2004 Alliant load data has lead target loads for 180 gr 40S&W - http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=2004%20alliant%20load%20data&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CCMQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fglarp.atk.com%2F2004%2F2004Catalogs%2F2004AlliantPowderSM.pdf&ei=4oUKT76HE-LWiALir_iJCQ&usg=AFQjCNHnWLp5LTU0YIrdLKjtAjtiKft_jg&cad=rja

I did some load testing with 180 gr lead 40S&W and Promo (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=518185) using 2004 Red Dot load data and like the 4.1-4.3 gr loads for moderate recoil and accuracy.

bds
January 9, 2012, 01:48 AM
I understand that its not a good idea to depend on whats posted unless you can verify it with a reliable sorce. Hince manuals. Am I missing something with the 180gr. bullets? Are they more dangerous than 165 because of presures? The reason I ask is I'm getting ready to purchase my bullets to reload my 40's, and planned on going with 180gr since thats what I carry. I'm new to reloading and have been reading manuals for nearly a year now. I just received my equipment and hope to start working up some loads. I'm not really interested in loading max loads, but moderate good shooting loads. Would the 165's be better for me?
It's good to verify with reliable sources. Unfortunately, there aren't much currently published load data for 180 gr lead bullet. Lyman #49 doesn't list load data for 180 gr lead bullets, just for 175 gr. I have shot a lot of 40S&W loads in jacketed/plated but when I started shooting lead, I had to reference jacketed load data for lead bullets. I start below start charge and monitor accuracy trends and reliable slide cycling. 2004 Alliant load data does have lead target loads for 180 gr bullet.

As to 180 vs 165, heavier 180 gr bullet tends to produce less felt recoil at target loads than lighter 165 gr bullet. As to pressure concerns, compare the published average max chamber pressures for each load. ;) If you want to practice for your carry ammunition, I would suggest you find the jacketed/plated/lead load that produces comparable POA/POI with similar felt recoil.

res7s
January 9, 2012, 04:31 AM
I use AA#7 with the Lee 401-175-TC. I worked my load up using the "185gr LC" data from the Accurate site. Mine weigh 180gr.
http://www.accuratepowder.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/accurate_load_data_3.5.pdf

JO JO
January 9, 2012, 12:29 PM
power pistol and plated have been good to me

Steve Koski
January 9, 2012, 01:12 PM
5 grains of Unique.

chrt396
January 9, 2012, 01:53 PM
I've been using 165g Xtreme plated bullets, 7.2g AA#5, mixed brass (carefully checked), CCI primers...and I forget what OCL stat was...going from memory..but this round has become my "Go To" round. Shoots accurately, clean and recoil is minimal. I'm not suggesting that you will get the same results, but for me..it's been great! .40 cal is a tricky subject. You'll get a lot of non-commital info on the forum on loads for this caliber. I would approach any advice...even mine with caution. Start low and work it up to what works for you and your gun. As far as 165 vs 180...I prefer 165's. Lots of guys on the steel matches state that 180g works best for them..but when they shoot my rounds..they are pleasantly surprised on how soft they shoot.

CHECK THE BOOKS FOR CURRENT ADVICE!!!!!!!!!! Anything else is purely dribble and opinion.

ssmacar
January 9, 2012, 07:16 PM
In the words of a GREAT President "trust but verify". I was really having trouble locating information on lead bullets. Thanks for the good information and sources. By the way just picked up the new Springfield XDM 5.25 in 45 ACP WOW is the best thing I can say. I have been a diehard 1911 shooter but very impressed with 5.25

bangbig
January 9, 2012, 07:46 PM
For full-power JHP loads, many would suggest Unique or slower burning powders (I personally prefer WSF).

Me too.

popper
January 10, 2012, 07:57 PM
I've used the 5gr Unique with 180 gr Xtreme plated and MBC #5 in an XDm with good results. HP-38 smoked more and was snappier. I have to shoot left-handed military style due to a weak right arm, but it does OK for me, for follow up shots.

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